PDA

View Full Version : An FSU Without a Book Thread is Like an FS Event Without Snark



Pages : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 [15] 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67

PrincessLeppard
10-13-2011, 12:04 PM
Anyone notice that Marge hasn't chimed in since starting Mockingjay? ;)

rfisher
10-13-2011, 12:11 PM
I hope she didn't poke her eyes out with a stick.

Prancer
10-13-2011, 01:03 PM
I'm reading Bill Bryson's At Home (http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/at-home-bill-bryson/1100265066?ean=9780767919395&itm=1&usri=bill%2bbryson%2bat%2bhome), which is, as always with Bryson, chock full of fascinating trivia told in a comfortably rambling style. I think it might ramble a bit more than some of his other work :shuffle: and there are a few anecdotes that serve no purpose whatsoever that I can tell, but still, who knew that houses were so fascinating?

Stefanie
10-13-2011, 02:03 PM
I'm reading Bill Bryson's At Home (http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/at-home-bill-bryson/1100265066?ean=9780767919395&itm=1&usri=bill%2bbryson%2bat%2bhome), which is, as always with Bryson, chock full of fascinating trivia told in a comfortably rambling style.

:lol:, you've summed up my thoughts on Bryson. I loved Made in America, but it was so difficult for me to read it without wanting to take notes so I could remember all of the interesting facts later. So much is packed into one page. :eek:

jeffisjeff
10-13-2011, 02:25 PM
I am wondering how our Jane Austen fans feel about this:


P.D. James could hold back no longer.

The 91-year-old detective novelist said Wednesday she was glad to finally complete a long-desired project a sequel to Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice."

James' "Death Comes to Pemberley" will be published by Faber & Faber in Britain in early November and by Alfred A. Knopf in the United states on Dec. 6.

James said in a telephone interview from her home in London that the new book allows her to indulge two great passions: Austen and crime stories. James' novel is the most recent of many sequels to "Pride and Prejudice."

"I love the idea of setting a book in Pemberley, six years after the marriage of Elizabeth and Darcy. And I love the idea of bringing murder to Pemberley," James said with a laugh.

http://news.yahoo.com/p-d-james-writes-jane-austen-sequel-184608469.html;_ylt=ArPhkSw4xqIMLSYygwYRNA5xFb8C;_ ylu=X3oDMTQyZjloMHQ3BG1pdANUb3BTdG9yeSBFbnRlcnRhaW 5tZW50U0YEcGtnAzg4ODJhYTRiLWUzNDAtMzdhZC1iNmI1LTc0 MzE3Y2Q4NGI2MwRwb3MDNwRzZWMDdG9wX3N0b3J5BHZlcgM3MT cyMGU2MC1mNTk0LTExZTAtYmJhNS01NDNiMGNiOGMxNmM-;_ylg=X3oDMTFyNDU2bG1rBGludGwDdXMEbGFuZwNlbi11cwRw c3RhaWQDBHBzdGNhdANlbnRlcnRhaW5tZW50BHB0A3NlY3Rpb2 5z;_ylv=3

Holley Calmes
10-13-2011, 04:57 PM
Loving PD James as much as I do, I will have to read this. Unless this is a joke? If not, it will be the only "sequel" to P&P I would read. I don't care for all these continuations of the story. I liked the three books that told the story from Darcy's point of view...kind of. Sacrilege! But PD James might be able to make it work.

Artemis@BC
10-13-2011, 04:58 PM
I just started The Rising of the Moon by Gladys Mitchell, a contemporary of Agatha Christie and Dorothy L. Sayers. So far I like it but am still waiting for her detective, Mrs. bradley, to appear and utter such gems as "Nature is a damp, inconvenient sort of place, where birds and animals wander about uncooked."

LOL. I actually didn't like the books all that much, but I loved the TV adaptations with Diana Rigg. Not the first time that they've taken a mediocre detective series and turned it great with some excellent acting and some finer-tuned scripts (Frost, Wycliffe, Barnaby/Midsomer, and Morse all spring to mind).

aliceanne
10-13-2011, 08:19 PM
I am wondering how our Jane Austen fans feel about this:



http://news.yahoo.com/p-d-james-writes-jane-austen-sequel-184608469.html;_ylt=ArPhkSw4xqIMLSYygwYRNA5xFb8C;_ ylu=X3oDMTQyZjloMHQ3BG1pdANUb3BTdG9yeSBFbnRlcnRhaW 5tZW50U0YEcGtnAzg4ODJhYTRiLWUzNDAtMzdhZC1iNmI1LTc0 MzE3Y2Q4NGI2MwRwb3MDNwRzZWMDdG9wX3N0b3J5BHZlcgM3MT cyMGU2MC1mNTk0LTExZTAtYmJhNS01NDNiMGNiOGMxNmM-;_ylg=X3oDMTFyNDU2bG1rBGludGwDdXMEbGFuZwNlbi11cwRw c3RhaWQDBHBzdGNhdANlbnRlcnRhaW5tZW50BHB0A3NlY3Rpb2 5z;_ylv=3

I've always suspected that Darcy might turn out to be a wife-beater or psychopath. He has so much repressed anger and resentment, and Austen doesn't reveal much about him.

Artemis@BC
10-13-2011, 09:45 PM
I've always suspected that Darcy might turn out to be a wife-beater or psychopath. He has so much repressed anger and resentment, and Austen doesn't reveal much about him.

Nah. He's just English.

dbell1
10-14-2011, 02:32 AM
Wow, what would possess you to reread that?? Good book, but depressing hardly begins to describe it.

I love Richard Adams writing style. Lyrical, brutal, surprising. I read it first in the 80's when it came out and it's haunted me ever since. My original copy got trashed so I rebought it. Tough read but so worth it.

Today, 3 more books showed up. I plan to take a weekend soon and just read. :)

Prancer
10-14-2011, 02:47 AM
I am wondering how our Jane Austen fans feel about this:

Deft, satirical, light-handed Jane Austen as done by stodgy, dour, heavy-handed P.D. James?

:scream::scream::scream:

Marge_Simpson
10-14-2011, 05:57 AM
I hope she didn't poke her eyes out with a stick.

Mais non!
It was not quite as good as the first two, but I liked it very much, particularly the ending - I never saw that coming. (Katniss murdering Coin)
The epilogue was sappy, to be sure, but I'd already assumed they would end up together.
I was v. pleased with myself for being suspicious of Coin from the first, and predicting Prim would die.
I was a little disppointed that none of my (rather complicated) theories panned out. I thought that possibly Madge's mother had initiated the whole Mockingjay plan to avenge her sister's death, and I was sure there was something going on with that pearl.
I loved Johanna and would have liked to find out more about her.
I think Suzanne Collins is brilliant.

Marge_Simpson
10-14-2011, 06:06 AM
Deft, satirical, light-handed Jane Austen as done by stodgy, dour, heavy-handed P.D. James?

:scream::scream::scream:

This book cracks me up:
http://www.amazon.com/Pride-Promiscuity-Scenes-Austen-Parody/dp/068487265X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1318568577&sr=1-1#_

Marge_Simpson
10-14-2011, 06:19 AM
I'm reading Bill Bryson's At Home (http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/at-home-bill-bryson/1100265066?ean=9780767919395&itm=1&usri=bill%2bbryson%2bat%2bhome), which is, as always with Bryson, chock full of fascinating trivia told in a comfortably rambling style. I think it might ramble a bit more than some of his other work :shuffle: and there are a few anecdotes that serve no purpose whatsoever that I can tell, but still, who knew that houses were so fascinating?

I adore Bill Bryson. I went to a reading he did in NYC when this first came out, and it was a hoot. He's hysterically funny, with a deadpan sort of humor. He read excerpts from "Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid" and "In a Sunburnt Country". From "At Home" he read the part about wigs and hairstyles, everyone was in stitches.
He speaks with a British accent, which I found kind of odd as he's American and went to live in the Uk as an adult.

mkats
10-15-2011, 04:29 AM
I had to fly to Atlanta and back within the last 48 hours and started and finished Barbara Kyle's The King's Daughter, thinking it was going to be a good Tudor story. It was... ehhhhh. Kyle's writing is pretty rough and the story reads more like a bad movie script than a good novel. Good enough to while away a few hours of time in the airport, but I'm glad it was a library book.

Moving onto Riding Lessons by Sara Gruen.