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flyingsit
10-10-2011, 03:08 PM
I downloaded Franzen's Freedom more than two months ago and there it sat. I finally started it last night and you know what? The man can write. He really can. His characters and their surroundings are just immediately there.

I know he's an arrogant SOB but he's got a bit of a reason for it.

I tried to read The Corrections a couple of years ago but I couldn't get more than 15 pages into it. I tried several times and then just gave it away.

dbell1
10-10-2011, 06:01 PM
:lol: The Corrections went out with my last yard sale at .25, no takers.

"Dark Summit" is coming this week. I'm rereading "The Plague Dogs" at home, and "Into Thin Air" at work (both depressing). Finished "The Forgotten Garden" this weekend. Loved most of it and Kate Morton has an Alice Hoffman-like way with words (hated the way the chapters jumped from 1907 to 2005 to 1975 though, I felt like I was in a time warp).

mkats
10-11-2011, 02:31 AM
Oh, I just finished The Forgotten Garden too! Loved it but had the same feeling as you as far as jumping goes - I got disappointed every time Nell came back, I liked Eliza's parts best!

Matryeshka
10-11-2011, 02:44 AM
I love finding a book that I wanted that I didn't know was out! Rick Riordan's Son of Neptune, the sequel to The Lost Hero is out. The story in some ways is a little stale, or at least the set-up is, but the history major in me squeals like an annoying nerdy fan girl over his interpretation of a "Roman" hero camp in modern America. That part is wonderfully done to the point that I wish it was given its full due and not mostly about Percy Jackson. I like seeing Percy Jackson, don't get me wrong, but I want to see him in the background. He's had his quest. I want new, Roman characters who do Roman-y things.

IceAlisa
10-11-2011, 02:45 AM
Started To Say Nothing Of The Dog. It just dawned on me that this is a quote from Jerome K. Jerome. :duh: Hope this book is half as funny as the original. Three Men In A Boat used to make me PML.

Allen
10-11-2011, 02:48 AM
I'm going back and rereading Carrie and Firestarter for a thesis project I'm working on with a student. I watched the film of Firestarter earlier and wow, it wasn't good. I think the project; however, is very interesting, so I'm excited about it.

Prancer
10-11-2011, 02:53 AM
I'm going back and rereading Carrie and Firestarter for a thesis project I'm working on with a student. I watched the film of Firestarter early and wow, it wasn't good. I think the project; however, is very interesting, so I'm excited about it.

Back off! Just back off!

jen_faith
10-11-2011, 11:23 AM
Terry Pratchett's new book, Snuff, is being released today. He's on a very short tour of the US and will be in DC on the 14th. I'm tempted...

On a book-related note I am squeeing with excitement over the news that Neil Gaiman's American Gods is being adapted into a six-season HBO series. Yay!

milanessa
10-11-2011, 11:34 AM
Not a new book but I just finished Carol Burnett's biography This Time Together. The most boring book ever. I'm not sure what I expected (it is Carol Burnett after all) but :yawn:.

aliceanne
10-11-2011, 10:49 PM
I see an ad for "Alice I Have Been" by Melanie Benjamin on this page. I read it this past summer.It is a fictionalized account of Alice Liddell and Lewis Carroll. In the postscript the author goes to great lengths to say that there is no evidence that Lewis Carroll was a pedophile and that his relationship with Alice was not unusual or inappropriate for the time and place, but that sure isn't the way her book plays out. My problem with the book is that she fictionalizes facts to make her story. For example, a well-known photo of Alice that took place in a studio with her mother present. She changes the setting to behind the bushes in the garden while Alice's mother is giving birth. She has Carroll undressing Alice to change into the costume....

I feel if you want to fictionalize a real person's life you should change the names, unless you are going to make your story an obvious parody. Let people rest in peace already. :2faced:

Marge_Simpson
10-12-2011, 06:48 AM
My apartment building has a sort of book exchange: people who have books they don't want leave them on a shelf in the laundry room. You can keep what you find there, or read it and put it back.
Anyway, someone left a load of kid's books there today. And I took "The Indian in the Cupboard" and read it at work. It is charming. :)

Artemis@BC
10-12-2011, 09:46 PM
Three Men In A Boat used to make me PML.

Funniest. Book. EVER!


I'm rereading "The Plague Dogs" (depressing) ...

Wow, what would possess you to reread that?? Good book, but depressing hardly begins to describe it.

Meanwhile, I finished The Flying Troutmans, and absolutely loved it. Definitely one of the best books I've read this year. Towes has such a talent for mixing pathos and humour, and her characters ring so true.

So I'm blasting through some magazines until I pick up A Visit from the Goon Squad from the library on Friday. I know it got some less than glowing reviews here ... but I'm keeping an open mind.

Orable
10-12-2011, 09:55 PM
I just came back from a trip to London and started reading The Anglo Files: A Field Guide to the British, by NYT journalist Sarah Lyall - an American who married a Brit and lives in London. The book is well-written and sometimes absolutely hilarious; it definitely has me PML'ing!

Nomad
10-13-2011, 05:14 AM
I just started The Rising of the Moon by Gladys Mitchell, a contemporary of Agatha Christie and Dorothy L. Sayers. So far I like it but am still waiting for her detective, Mrs. bradley, to appear and utter such gems as "Nature is a damp, inconvenient sort of place, where birds and animals wander about uncooked."

Wyliefan
10-13-2011, 05:23 AM
I just started The Rising of the Moon by Gladys Mitchell, a contemporary of Agatha Christie and Dorothy L. Sayers. So far I like it but am still waiting for her detective, Mrs. bradley, to appear and utter such gems as "Nature is a damp, inconvenient sort of place, where birds and animals wander about uncooked."

Ooh, I like the sound of that. I adore the detective writers from that era, especially Sayers.