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agalisgv
09-13-2011, 12:10 AM
They were so close--they were like sisters. So she lost her very best friend from childhood. Otoh she survived bc of wanting to be with her daughter, so she's thankful too. It's the mixed emotions about it all (and the fact her bf was a mom too, so she has to watch her friend's family go through what her family would have otherwise).

Just tough all the way around.

sk8pics
09-13-2011, 01:14 AM
All these stories are so heartbreaking. Hugs to everyone and thank you all for sharing your stories and the stories of your friends and family.

barbk
09-13-2011, 02:52 AM
Agalisgv, I hope your cousin's auntie can get some help with this; it was never her fault, just like it wasn't the fault of any of the victims. I hope you get to see the memorial with your uncle's name on it some day, and I hope it provides at least a little comfort.

FigureSpins
09-13-2011, 04:41 AM
(((Agalisgv))) Reading your story made me realize why so many veterans of WWI and WWII never wanted to talk about - survivor's remorse. So sorry for your losses and I hope your aunt can find peace and solace.

VIETgrlTerifa
09-13-2011, 05:13 AM
My dad worked for the military and spent much of his time at the Pentagon. That day we tried contacting him, but all the circuits were down. He turned out to be ok. My uncle worked in the next department from my dad. He was called in that day to either pick up or drop off some files at the Pentagon. He was there when the plane stuck. He did not survive.

My cousin was living with me at the time. Because her mom had health issues, she had been raised for awhile by her auntie (the two were very close). Her auntie was a stewardess for United Airlines. Whenever my cousin wanted to visit me, her auntie would give her free vouchers of some sort for her to fly.

On 9/11, we knew her auntie was scheduled to fly, but didn't know when or which flight. Again, circuits were down so we couldn't locate her right away. We later learned she was scheduled for UA 93 that day. In a strange twist of fate, my cousin's auntie switched flights at the last minute with her best friend. It was her daughter's first day of kindergarten, so she called her bf to see if she would switch routes with her at the last minute in order to go with her daughter to her first day of school. Her friend agreed to the switch. We later learned her bf was the first to be killed--her throat was apparently slashed. My cousin's auntie has never forgiven herself for her bf's death.

I just read this and I couldn't help but cry. I'm really sorry that your aunt had to not only lose her best friend, but to lose it in that way. I hope she's open to receive help with the guilt you say she's still facing. Nobody should deal with something so heavy for so long.

skateboy
09-13-2011, 07:31 AM
Agalisgv,

I am so sorry to hear these stories! Cruisin is right; your aunt must forgive herself because she really could not be the cause of this.

Agreed. So sorry to hear this terrible story.

I was living in Manhattan on 9/11. It was my day off, so I slept in until about 9:30. When I woke up I turned on the television and most of the stations were not working--the ones that were were quite fuzzy (later found out that many of the satellites were at the top of the WTC). Of course, I found out the news rather quickly, ran and looked out the window (I was on the 5th floor, about 5 miles from the WTC). It was such a beautiful day, but there was this huge, ominous looking cloud in the distance and there was a strange smell in the air. There was no phone service, but I managed to get online and let my family on the west coast know that I was okay.

My roommate came home a few minutes later and we stared at the fuzzy TV station for about three hours. Although the horror was only 5 miles away, watching it on TV made it seem like it was in some faraway place. After three hours, we walked down the street, found a place where we sat outside and drank margaritas. Lots of people there--everyone was friendly with one another, although I know we were all basically shell-shocked as we saw and heard all the ambulances driving by. I'll never forget it.

genevieve
09-13-2011, 07:46 AM
I was on a self-imposed 9/11 media blackout this weekend and only now read this thread. thanks to all who shared their stories.

skatefan
09-13-2011, 11:13 AM
Oh my, I am so sorry. The flight attendants were so brave. God Bless your family. Off to have a good cry...
Me too. Agalisgv what a sad story.
I would just say this - what happened that day is no-one's fault except for those wicked people who planned and carried out these truly evil acts.

On that day, early afternoon here, I was half watching some programme on the BBC as I did the ironing, when the live broadcast interrupted the programme - I thought at first the tv had somehow switched itself over to a film until I realised it was actually happening right there live in America. I genuinely thought it was a desperately tragic accident until the second plane struck. Then updates of a third, then fourth hijacked plane - I could not turn off the tv totally disbelieving of what I was seeing. I shed many tears those days.

It is sad to read that some people believe the memorial should only be for the families of those who died. If I ever make the trip to New York then my first port of call would be to pay my respects at the memorial to those who died and to those who worked so hard to save them. I do not have the capacity to comprehend what the people on the planes, in the towers and on the ground went through. But as a member of humanity I would want to acknowledge their suffering and courage.

Thank you to everyone here who has shared their stories.

allezfred
09-13-2011, 11:22 AM
Me too. Agalisgv what a sad story.
I would just say this - what happened that day is no-one's fault except for those wicked people who planned and carried out these truly evil acts.


All of this.

I mentioned earlier that our President made a really lovely short speech at the commemoration ceremony here in Dublin on Sunday. I thought the following pretty much summed up my views on the memorial:


Dr. Martin Luther King once said “Out of the mountain of despair, a stone of hope”. The sensitive and moving memorial that now marks the mountain of despair that was Ground Zero in New York is a reassuring witness to the enduring stone of hope, the stone that did not fall asunder even when the very foundations seemed to tremble.

Certainly things changed but the American people did not fall apart, nor did the world. Innocence was lost but not fortitude. And on this day those of us who believe in the right of every human being to live in peace, in equality, in dignity, protected by the shield of invincible civil and human rights, commit ourselves anew to the task of building - stone of hope by stone of hope - a better and a safer world.

That surely is the best memorial we can give to those innocent lives that were so wastefully and unconscionably sacrificed on the altar of hatred this day ten years ago.

Moto Guzzi
09-13-2011, 02:28 PM
(((agalisgv))) I'm sorry about your uncle. I hope some day your cousin's auntie will be able to accept what happened to her friend and find some peace of mind.

I was a volunteer at the family crisis center for the Pentagon victims. The family members I met and the stories I heard will always be in my heart; I can never forget their courage and grace under such heartbreaking circumstances.

skatesindreams
09-13-2011, 02:29 PM
^^^
allezfred, thank you for sharing that.

Moka-Ananas
09-13-2011, 10:25 PM
I remember it was a very beautiful day, it was warm and I came home after school and went to practice.
We were rehearsing our show on the ice when my coach's husband came to the ice rink and told us what had happened in NY.
After I came home I switched on the TV and thought it must be a movie but then I switched channels and the two collapsing towers were just everywhere.
I couldn't believe it.

Buzz
09-14-2011, 02:45 AM
Better last than never.... The service was beautiful and so is the memorial.

Japanfan
09-14-2011, 02:59 AM
Condolences re the loss of your uncle, AG. And I'm sorry to hear about your cousin's auntie and her friend, as well.

ks777
09-14-2011, 03:40 AM
My dad worked for the military and spent much of his time at the Pentagon. That day we tried contacting him, but all the circuits were down. He turned out to be ok. My uncle worked in the next department from my dad. He was called in that day to either pick up or drop off some files at the Pentagon. He was there when the plane stuck. He did not survive.

My cousin was living with me at the time. Because her mom had health issues, she had been raised for awhile by her auntie (the two were very close). Her auntie was a stewardess for United Airlines. Whenever my cousin wanted to visit me, her auntie would give her free vouchers of some sort for her to fly.

On 9/11, we knew her auntie was scheduled to fly, but didn't know when or which flight. Again, circuits were down so we couldn't locate her right away. We later learned she was scheduled for UA 93 that day. In a strange twist of fate, my cousin's auntie switched flights at the last minute with her best friend. It was her daughter's first day of kindergarten, so she called her bf to see if she would switch routes with her at the last minute in order to go with her daughter to her first day of school. Her friend agreed to the switch. We later learned her bf was the first to be killed--her throat was apparently slashed. My cousin's auntie has never forgiven herself for her bf's death.

I am so sorry!! It made me cry just reading your post.