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Anita18
09-12-2011, 04:19 PM
Our friend, who passed, had just taken a new job at the WTC. 9/11 was his first day. He was on a floor below the hit level, and he and an associate were evacuating. He suddenly remembered something he needed in his office. told his co-worker to go on and he went back to get whatever it was he needed. he never made it out. We know this because his co-worker did make it. So sad. The brother of our friend was supposed to be on the Boston/LA flight the next day. His co-worker was scheduled to go back to LA on 9/11. Our friend's brother decided to leave a day earlier with his co-worker. Our friend's family believed him to be safe, as they thought he was leaving the next day. They found out, on the news (because he had some celebrity status), that he was on one of the planes. So many tragic stories. UMBS mentioned Karma, it can be fickle.
I don't think you can believe in karma when it comes to things like this. Nobody deserves to die in a terrorist attack. Survivor's guilt would drive me insane.

It's just life. Tragedy happens to some, but not others. All we can do is make do with what we have and cherish every moment on this earth, because we never know when our time is up.

Rob
09-12-2011, 04:22 PM
I was at my desk at my law firm, a block from the White House. My office looked out over the Treasury Department's roof at the White House roof. I was preparing for a call with a company that was located in the WFC. The lawyer in the office next door arrived and told me he heard on the radio that a plane had just hit the WTC. I asked "a terrorist attack or a plane lost control," and he said "I think a terrorist attack." I got on the internet and they were showing the footage of the second plane hitting. I told him it was now 2 hits, and I called my mother. She put the news on and thought she was seeing a simulation and then realized it was the real thing. I was telling her what I saw on the Internet, and she was telling me what she saw on TV. We were on the phone for a while. Then she said, oh, oh, they are reporting the Pentagon was hit too. I wheeled around in my chair and saw the smoke billowing out of the Pentagon across the river, and then I saw the security forces on the roof of the White House complete with very large weapons. Just then, our office manager appeared in my doorway and said "get out of the window immediately and evacuate the building." I called the other lawyer for my meeting who told me the call was canceled because the client had evacuated the WFC. She went home. Most of us didn't feel a sense of urgency because we could see the traffic at a stand still on the roads, but I now know, if the brave souls on United 93 had not taken that plane down, I would still have been there when it got to DC. Then we felt the other explosion that Moto Guzzi mentions (fuel tanks). I packed up and went down to the garage and got my car, but it took me 3 hours to get home (a 25-30 minute trip without traffic). I have to say that people were quite a bit nicer than usual in DC traffic. Too shocked to honk and yell I guess.

I never went to Ground Zero. I have driven by Shanksville, but I was on business and could not stop. I would like to stop there one day to pay tribute to U93. My husband was 2 blocks from the White House in the other direction, and a number of my friends work at the Capitol so those people most likely saved some of us.



I later heard that people in the lobby of the WTC buildings at the moment the planes hit had been burned by flames shooting out of the elevator shafts
I saw one of these women on the news. She has a book out. She was very badly burned and has had a lot of surgeries, but her outlook on life is quite remarkable.

I saw part of a show on CNN about some of the people who are mentioned in the footnotes to the 9/11 commission report. I felt so awful for poor customer service reps who checked in the terrorists -- one of them was asked to review the passenger lists and when he saw the names of 2 of the terrorists, he remembered them and said "I did this." Of course, he didn't, and he knows he didn't, but he can't stop thinking about it. Another now has hallucinations of Mohammed Atta -- he checked him in. He sees him in stores, driving back and forth in front of his house. He said he didn't even believe in hallucinations until he started having them. One of them can't stand beautiful blue skies because every time he sees one, he thinks of it being 9/11 blue.

Another flight traffic controller was interviewed -- he started sending messages to all the flights in the air, asking them if they needed assistance. If they responded, he told the pilot to beware of cockpit intrusion. One of the flights he reached was U93. The pilot didn't understand the warning and asked for confirmation. The controller was warning multiple flights and by then it was too late. The controller's life has never been the same -- he started grounding flights for no reason and finally retired on disability. He and his wife live on a sailboat and he broke up many times during the interview. He said he was trying to warn everyone as quickly as possible.

Vash01
09-12-2011, 04:45 PM
Our friend, who passed, had just taken a new job at the WTC. 9/11 was his first day. He was on a floor below the hit level, and he and an associate were evacuating. He suddenly remembered something he needed in his office. told his co-worker to go on and he went back to get whatever it was he needed. he never made it out. We know this because his co-worker did make it. So sad. The brother of our friend was supposed to be on the Boston/LA flight the next day. His co-worker was scheduled to go back to LA on 9/11. Our friend's brother decided to leave a day earlier with his co-worker. Our friend's family believed him to be safe, as they thought he was leaving the next day. They found out, on the news (because he had some celebrity status), that he was on one of the planes. So many tragic stories. UMBS mentioned Karma, it can be fickle.

So sad! It's destiny. It was his time to go. May he rest in peace.

allezfred
09-12-2011, 04:46 PM
The memorial structure at Ground Zero is amazing.

I know some survivors and bereaved family members aren't happy with it, but I thought it was stunning.

IceAlisa
09-12-2011, 04:52 PM
I know some survivors and bereaved family members aren't happy with it, but I thought it was stunning.

Do you know why? I think it's exactly right and deeply moving. That waterfall with the water streaming deep inside is like the gigantic hole in the heart of the nation and the survivors. It's a powerful representation of grief and absence, a negative space. I can't imagine anything better.

FigureSpins
09-12-2011, 05:00 PM
I saw part of a show on CNN about some of the people who are mentioned in the footnotes to the 9/11 commission report. I felt so awful for poor customer service reps who checked in the terrorists -- one of them was asked to review the passenger lists and when he saw the names of 2 of the terrorists, he remembered them and said "I did this." Of course, he didn't, and he knows he didn't, but he can't stop thinking about it. Another now has hallucinations of Mohammed Atta -- he checked him in. He sees him in stores, driving back and forth in front of his house. He said he didn't even believe in hallucinations until he started having them. One of them can't stand beautiful blue skies because every time he sees one, he thinks of it being 9/11 blue.

Another flight traffic controller was interviewed -- he started sending messages to all the flights in the air, asking them if they needed assistance. If they responded, he told the pilot to beware of cockpit intrusion. One of the flights he reached was U93. The pilot didn't understand the warning and asked for confirmation. The controller was warning multiple flights and by then it was too late. The controller's life has never been the same -- he started grounding flights for no reason and finally retired on disability. He and his wife live on a sailboat and he broke up many times during the interview. He said he was trying to warn everyone as quickly as possible.

That's so sad that they still suffer with guilt and remorse. I certainly don't blame them for what happened and I hope no one else does. Maybe they'll be able to forgive themselves.

I am a card-carrying crybaby at wakes and funerals - no joke: if your nasty neighbor dies and has no one to mourn him, invite me and you'll have a crying section. I wear my heart on my sleeve.

I was the President of my dd's school's Parents Guild at the time of 9/11 and part of my role was to represent the school at these types of events. During my four years in office, I went to a few parents' funerals (incredibly sad-cancer) and some grandparents (not so bad), but it was just a handful of people and I was able to keep it somewhat together. (Although two of the parents who died broke my heart - they were personal friends from swim team I coached.)

Within three months of 9/11, I had attended 3 dozen victims' wakes and funerals for the school, along with quite a few memorial services - over 1,000 families in total on 9/11 were without closure since no remains were found for thier loved ones. I was shell-shocked by the last few and that numbness still lasts today. I had never known what it felt like to be stoic until that time, but I knew I had to suck it up and be strong because those people were hurting, especially at the memorials.

My youngest DD, who was 3 at the time, wrote a beautiful essay this weekend on why we all have to work together to overcome the evil that became 9/11. It was very sweet, if a bit naive, but from the heart. I'm sure she'll get a good grade.

Cachoo
09-12-2011, 05:01 PM
I love the waterfall--it symbolizes so much and the names are not microscopic. I love that they used technology so the names will not be too hot to the touch in summer or too cold to the touch in winter.
I am home today and my friend told me to watch a documentary called "Rebirth" on Showtime. If you have Showtime (or Netflix) it is certainly worth watching as it follows several people who were at the WTC or have a family/friend connection to it. The process of watching these people slowly recover from injury, from grief, from survivor's guilt---so many different experiences---is wrenching but ultimately hopeful.

Cachoo
09-12-2011, 05:15 PM
FYI: the NY TImes has an amazing interactive site of the 9/11 (http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2011/09/08/nyregion/911-tapes.html?hp) tapes between all the airtraffic controllers.

Thank you for this. I was a 911 dispatcher and once during a multi-alarm fire we did a PAR (a rollcall) and I could not find one of the firemen. I felt so much dread and fear that I had "lost" him but blessedly it turned out that his radio had malfunctioned. He was fine. I think about those 911 dispatchers on 9/11 doing PARs: "Ladder 32", "Engine 11" and so on and getting no response at all. You don't even know what they look like but after you have been there awhile there is this bond...you are looking out for them in a small way and I can't imagine what the dispatchers were going through. Or I can but the scale is what I can't get my head around. I hope the dispatchers are okay.

Zemgirl
09-12-2011, 05:27 PM
FYI: the NY TImes has an amazing interactive site of the 9/11 (http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2011/09/08/nyregion/911-tapes.html?hp) tapes between all the airtraffic controllers.
On the first anniversary of 9/11, USA Today had a really interesting two-part feature on the events from the perspective of flight controllers, pilots and other airline workers. Part one is here (http://www.usatoday.com/news/sept11/2002-08-12-clearskies_x.htm) and part two here (http://www.usatoday.com/news/sept11/2002-08-12-hijacker-daytwo_x.htm).

barbk
09-12-2011, 05:27 PM
I didn't know until the school carpool didn't arrive, and I called to find out why.

Mr. Barbk was at work at a tech startup, where they grabbed a tv used for training videos and set it up. Meanwhile, an all company meeting by speakerphone was scheduled for 10 am our time -- led by the company's founder on Long Island. The meeting went ahead, and the founder told everyone that the company was being shut down that day. Nobody seemed to care, given what else was happening. I still can't imagine how a doctor at a hospital on LI could go ahead and complete a shutdown right then. His ability to compartmentalize must have been astounding.

The project manager had been in NY for meetings with him, and ended up renting a car and driving back across the country.

UMBS -- I'm very glad you were so lucky that day. My cousin was a NYPD officer, and his brother a NYFD firefighter, and we didn't know for more than a day that both survived when so many from the Rockaways died.

skatesindreams
09-12-2011, 05:32 PM
I saw one of these women on the news. She has a book out. She was very badly burned and has had a lot of surgeries, but her outlook on life is quite remarkable.

Rob, her name is Lauren Manning:
http://www.amazon.com/Unmeasured-Strength-Lauren-Manning/dp/0805094636

Piers Morgan's interview was very good.

cruisin
09-12-2011, 06:09 PM
Do you know why? I think it's exactly right and deeply moving. That waterfall with the water streaming deep inside is like the gigantic hole in the heart of the nation and the survivors. It's a powerful representation of grief and absence, a negative space. I can't imagine anything better.

I agree, it is exactly right. I can only imagine that possibly the representation of grief might be what bothers some. Maybe they would rather have seen a soaring memorial representing strength and rising above despair? Maybe they think it's too simple? Maybe they think it should be seen from a greater distance? I don't know the answer, just "maybe" thoughts.

Civic
09-12-2011, 06:23 PM
One thing I'll always remember is what a beautiful day September 11, 2001 was where I was living at the time. It was clear and sunny with temperatures in the 70s and low humidity. It was a Tuesday and we were in the third week of fall semester at my former university. I attended a Reference Department meeting that morning from 9-11. Afterwards, I went downstairs to Media Resources to ask a colleague about a DVD one of my professors wanted. They had the TV on and were watching CNN. That's when I found out.

FigureSpins
09-12-2011, 06:25 PM
Do you know why? I think it's exactly right and deeply moving. That waterfall with the water streaming deep inside is like the gigantic hole in the heart of the nation and the survivors. It's a powerful representation of grief and absence, a negative space. I can't imagine anything better.

Some of them feel the area is a graveyard, that the still-unidentified remains should be interred and nothing built there to attract "tourists and gawkers." I dunno - to me, the memorial will be like the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Arlington, VA. I've gone there to pray for their souls and their families, even though my family isn't linked to any. That's sort of their objection: a few of the more-vocal objectors don't want anyone to be able to visit the memorial except relatives and friends, treating it as a mausoleum. I don't think they understand how many people KNEW someone who died in the WTC, but hadn't lost anyone close, and would want to pay their respects at that site.

Some have also expressed disgust that the City or others will somehow make money from the memorial, by selling admission tickets. Still, that would cover the costs of upkeep, long-term, after a few generations. (Just being honest) The one compelling objection I heard was street vendors hawking "WTC Memorial" t-shirts and trinkets - making money from death. That one's a legit complaint, imo. NYC has enough tackiness without that trash.

Another complaint that's been expressed over and over is that the planned memorial doesn't use the materials that were carted to SI's Great Kills landfill. The pile was sifted through (my BFF's dad was there for months) and any remains that were found, but not identified, are now in a holding chapel in Manhattan. Those remains are supposed to be interred in the memorial, seven stories underground, but the remaining "pile" at Great Kills will become a park. Many survivors feel that their loved ones' cremated remains are part of that material, so it should be brought back to the site and interred as well. It's a huge pile, even with the searchers removing remains and salvaging things for memorials around the world. The survivors equate it to "throwing their loved ones out with the trash." I can see both sides of that argument.

It's very emotional and there are a lot of different viewpoints. I don't know that the objectors can, or are willing to, find a compromise. I think regardless of what the powers that be do, there will always be objections and disagreement, some of it is just coming out of raw pain and mourning.

skatesindreams
09-12-2011, 06:31 PM
There will never be a "memorial" that will satisfy everyone.
Given that, I believe that they have done a magnificent job; honoring the lost, while moving forward with the construction of the new tower.