PDA

View Full Version : Tipping - For? Against? How Much? Yes To Waitstaff, But No To...?



Pages : 1 2 3 4 5 6 [7] 8 9

vesperholly
09-12-2011, 09:31 PM
Until these issues started cropping up, I never considered tipping for postal services, housekeeping services in hotels/motels. Tipping is so sensitive in nature

Postal services?! The UPS man probably makes more than I do, and I know that USPS does. The only person I could see tipping is a bike messenger, and that's more of a delivery service like pizza delivery.

Pierre
09-12-2011, 09:40 PM
Postal services? Are you referring to tipping when receiving a package in your room during an extended stay at a hotel? Or perhaps giving the postman a gift for Christmas? Because I've done those things, but I can't think of other situations where I'd consider it appropriate to tip someone for postal services.

skatemommy
09-12-2011, 09:43 PM
My garbage truck driver sends us a Christmas card every year and I send him some cash or a gas card. That's hard work that I think deserves something.

cruisin
09-12-2011, 09:51 PM
I give a Christmas/Holiday tip/gift to the postman, the trash collector, my manicurist, and my hair stylist (on the day that I give the gifts to the manicurist/hairstylist, that is in lieu of a regular tip).

BigB08822
09-12-2011, 10:31 PM
I don't understand the people who are confused about why they have to tip and where to draw the line on who to tip. When it comes to restaurants, in the US, you tip because the server makes around $2 an hour and relies on tips to make enough money to live. No one can live on $2 an hour in the US. You tip or don't eat in the restaurant. There is no point in arguing about whether you should tip the chef, bus boys, etc just to make yourself feel better when you stiff the waitress. The bus boys make at least minimum wage AND the servers tip out to them, usually a percentage of their sales or tips. The chefs make a salary or an hourly wage.

numbers123
09-12-2011, 10:59 PM
Brian - I think you missed my post that in reality I tip between 15-20%.

And basically my question wasn't one that I need an answer for, although genevieve did clear up something I had wondered about. I have never been a wait staff person but my roommate in college was and I saw how hard she worked, how tired she was at the end of a shift. I have no doubt that the wait staff work hard for the money. I tip more than my husband. I tip more if I have squatted at a table for a longer period of time that normal.

It was at what point should we no longer consider a person's job a service? Should it be based upon salary tables and if so, should those salaries be made known when you enter a restaurant or hair salon or other business, so that you know what you are expect to compensate for the lack of employer responsibility? if a certain service provider makes less than xx amount per hour we are obligated to make it up? I am paying for a service or meal that the owner is getting a profit from, why should I subsidize their lack of proper payment for their employees? However that is an issue for PI. The lack of responsibility of employers to pay and appropriately support their employees because it eats into their profits.

Kasey
09-13-2011, 12:08 AM
(is thinking about putting out a tip jar at the nursing station; we may be paid better, but it's never enough for being treated like a physical and verbal pinata on a regular basis....)

my little pony
09-13-2011, 12:09 AM
imagine what kind of stuff might be put in the jar at the nursing station....

cruisin
09-13-2011, 12:23 AM
(is thinking about putting out a tip jar at the nursing station; we may be paid better, but it's never enough for being treated like a physical and verbal pinata on a regular basis....)

When my parents were in the hospital, we usually brought the nurses a box of chocolate or some cookies from the bakery. Not a real tip, but an expression of appreciation for truly wonderful women and men.

skatemommy
09-13-2011, 12:35 AM
Cruisin, so true. My dad spent some time in a nursing home and I had some unwanted gifts (pjs, robes) that I took to the staff to give to the long term residents there. Never have I seen so much joy in the staff that had Christmas presents to give to the patients who did not have family in the area. I bawled all the way to my car and home.

BigB08822
09-13-2011, 12:48 AM
Entire post

I know I mentioned some things you said but I really wasn't directing my post to you specifically. Your post just reminded me of things I have heard many times over so I touched on what you said. :)

CantALoop
09-13-2011, 03:25 AM
So if you had a wonderful customer who was understanding and kind and let you go ahead and serve that ass yelling about their mocha and missing their bus do you tip them?

When customers are considerate like that, I usually offered them a size upgrade or extra shot/flavor for free :)

danceronice
09-13-2011, 04:59 PM
See my post about what tipping does to waitstaff's takehome versus after-tax takehome for the 'hourly' kitchen staff (if there IS an executive chef, he's salaried and in most places isn't alway that hands-on with food prep, that's management.) Tipping means the waitstaff cleans up and the people who actually make the food are making around minimum. And believe me, they only share big cash tips with the bussers if they think it was seen.

I don't use a hairdresser, so on the odd occasion where I do go to one and someone else isn't paying (ie a wedding) I'd tip. I will NOT tip someone I know is getting paid more per hour than I do (ie union anything, garbage, USPS). I don't usually put any money in tip jars (especially not someplace like Starbucks where I know what sort of benefits you can get.) Only if they did something really above and beyond. I'd rather put any change I don't keep in the charity jar if it's something I actually want to support. (I still remember the sad hound dog piggy banks a lot of places had when I was a kid with the note on them "I'm so hungry/it makes me cry/if you don't help me/I may die" from the local humane society. Humans take a lot of persuading for me, animals I'm a giant sucker.)

milanessa
09-13-2011, 05:03 PM
When customers are considerate like that, I usually offered them a size upgrade or extra shot/flavor for free :)

That's a nice gesture...but actually the owner pays, right?

nubka
09-13-2011, 06:21 PM
That's a nice gesture...but actually the owner pays, right?

He/she should. Good customer relations. Besides, it's not like she is upgrading every other drink... :)