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allezfred
09-12-2011, 10:27 AM
I head to London and Paris in about 10 days, what is standard tipping practice for tipping in London? 15%? 20%? Help!

Can't speak for London, but imagine it's not too dissimilar to here. First of all, I'd check to see if there was a service charge on the bill. Then if not 10% if you felt the service was good, but there's really no obligation to tip if you feel the service isn't worth it.

gingercrush
09-12-2011, 10:31 AM
We don't tip in new Zealand so for me the whole give people extra largely baffles me. My partner and I do tip for what we believe is a great experience. But that would be rare. Its just not the custom here. Many would be on above minimum wage here anyway.

CantALoop
09-12-2011, 12:57 PM
I don't understand the tip jars at fast food/non-restaurant food places like Subway, ice-cream parlors, bakeries, cafes, etc. Why should I tip them? Aren't they paid for doing what they are doing? And how is the tip jar divided among the workers?

I used to work at Starbucks - the tips were pooled for each pay period, then we got a cut of that proportional to the amount of hours we worked to the total hours of all workers. For myself, it usually came out to about $2-3 every week for 19 hours.

Now that I'm on the other side of the counter, I usually drop the change in the tip jar. However, if a worker is really outstanding or if I had an extremely complicated order, I try to discreetly slip them their tip outside of the jar.

milanessa
09-12-2011, 01:19 PM
I used to work at Starbucks - the tips were pooled for each pay period, then we got a cut of that proportional to the amount of hours we worked to the total hours of all workers. For myself, it usually came out to about $2-3 every week for 19 hours.

Now that I'm on the other side of the counter, I usually drop the change in the tip jar. However, if a worker is really outstanding or if I had an extremely complicated order, I try to discreetly slip them their tip outside of the jar.

That answers the question about division of the tips but why? Sure, found money is always a nice thing but where does it end?

cruisin
09-12-2011, 02:09 PM
I think that what Panera Bread does is actually nice (I hope I am not being naive). They do not have a tip container, but a container to put what you would offer as a tip, which goes to a local food bank. They all have them and they support their communities, I think that's great.

Angelskates
09-12-2011, 02:29 PM
That answers the question about division of the tips but why?

Because people put money into it. It wouldn't be there if it was continuously empty. It ends only when people stop putting money in!

millyskate
09-12-2011, 02:43 PM
I never used to tip much until I did a job where tips happen. Now, I always tip well if the service has been good.

milanessa
09-12-2011, 02:53 PM
I think that what Panera Bread does is actually nice (I hope I am not being naive). They do not have a tip container, but a container to put what you would offer as a tip, which goes to a local food bank. They all have them and they support their communities, I think that's great.

That does sound like a nice thing. I haven't noticed one in our local Panera but I don't go there very often - I'll have to look for it next time.

numbers123
09-12-2011, 03:05 PM
It seems this thread topic comes up every 6-9 months and I will bet that it comes up around Christmas or holidays.

In theory, I object to the need for tipping. There are many service jobs that if someone was tipping on service alone would get a tip. Most every job is based upon the service that they provide to another. Where and when do you say that tipping should or should not be an "expectation"? Some professions or employers have a rule that one should not accept a tip (healthcare is one). Do you tip the plummer? the cable installer? the person who sells you your phone, furniture, etc. They can provide you great service above and beyond or poor service.

In practice I generally tip 20% for dining wait staff. But then I am confused as to whether I should independently give tips to the staff who clean the tables or are the assistant to the wait staff. Do I include a tip for the cook - they did a great part of the work for my meal? The people whose only job is to seat me?

In practice I tip my hair stylist and when I went to a massage therapist ~ 15-20% but my dilemma is when I tip well one time, now I am stuck with doing the same tip every time. Maybe I thought today's service was outstanding but not the next time, maybe I had a little extra money that I could share this appointment but the next time I have experienced a money flow issue like a loss of job or medical issue. And I have been advised that owners of their establishments should not be tipped because they entire amount of the payment for the service goes into their pocket.

Until these issues started cropping up, I never considered tipping for postal services, housekeeping services in hotels/motels. Tipping is so sensitive in nature

El Rey
09-12-2011, 03:12 PM
I normally tip 20% but has this always been the norm? It just seems like it used to be less. Or maybe I was just younger and didn't know any better.

barbk
09-12-2011, 04:43 PM
My experience was that 10% seemed to be the norm back in the sixties and seventies. 15% in the eighties and nineties, and now 20% seems pretty common for restaurant tipping.

CantALoop
09-12-2011, 08:42 PM
That answers the question about division of the tips but why? Sure, found money is always a nice thing but where does it end?

Why? Because I know what it's like to be on the other side of that counter. You have to put up with some sh*t and attitude from customers who think they can yank your chain just because you're working a low-wage job. I tip if they're doing strong work just to show that they're appreciated.

When I was working there, I knew that maybe only a fraction of a cent from each tip would find its way back to me, but if anything I appreciated the gesture more than the money, and thanked the customer even if it was only a few pennies.

milanessa
09-12-2011, 09:05 PM
Why? Because I know what it's like to be on the other side of that counter. You have to put up with some sh*t and attitude from customers who think they can yank your chain just because you're working a low-wage job. I tip if they're doing strong work just to show that they're appreciated.

When I was working there, I knew that maybe only a fraction of a cent from each tip would find its way back to me, but if anything I appreciated the gesture more than the money, and thanked the customer even if it was only a few pennies.


So if you had a wonderful customer who was understanding and kind and let you go ahead and serve that ass yelling about their mocha and missing their bus do you tip them?

genevieve
09-12-2011, 09:07 PM
In practice I generally tip 20% for dining wait staff. But then I am confused as to whether I should independently give tips to the staff who clean the tables or are the assistant to the wait staff. Do I include a tip for the cook - they did a great part of the work for my meal? The people whose only job is to seat me?
No - the bussers and cooks are paid out by the server, so a portion of your tip is already going to them.

When I was a busboy I did get a thrill out of the occasional direct tip from a customer, but it was a high end restaurant and if I did get a direct tip, it was generally a dollar (I think I once got a $10 direct tip and was overjoyed, whee!). So if a busser ends up giving really exemplary service, feel free to tip them, but it's not necessary or expected.

nubka
09-12-2011, 09:11 PM
While I always tip, I didn't vote on this poll, because I tip according to what kind service I recieved. :) :)