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allezfred
09-10-2011, 08:32 PM
Why am I NOT surprised? :lol: :rolleyes:

I'm not French so I'm allowed to say it. ;)

barbk
09-10-2011, 08:37 PM
I'm tipping 20% at restaurants these days, but always leaving extra if we end up occupying the table for a while. Yesterday I went to breakfast with a group (separate checks) -- we were there for 1 1/2 hours, and the people on either side of me tipped 15%. I figured 30% was not at all unreasonable for mine given how long we'd been there, but I gather that is not the common approach.

olympic
09-10-2011, 08:56 PM
I tip 15% - 20% at restaurants, bars and salons [hair, pedicure]

I tip $1 / bag for bellman at Hotels; $1 per day for the Hotel Housekeeper [ex - $4 for a 4-day stay]; $5 for a good restaurant recommendation from the Hotel Concierge, more $$ if the Concierge went above and beyond on a project during my stay.

I tip 15% to taxi drivers on top of the fare. Lately, a lot of taxi drivers have been acting like they deserve more :rolleyes:

genevieve
09-10-2011, 09:01 PM
Regarding minimum wage for servers, different states have different laws. In California, for instance, minimum wage is mandatory before tips are added.
Minimum wage is the same for all professions in WA State as well - AND the minimum wage here is the highest in the nation, so servers make at least $8.67/hour. So I suppose that people who are indignant about having to tip to bring wages to the minimum could avoid tipping in Washington but they're still jerks :P.

I tip 20%+ in restaurants unless the service is offensive

Coffee shops I either tip $1 (for places I frequent often, which are always independently owned), round up to the next dollar (for places I don't normally go, or if the minimal customer service required of baristas is unstellar, or not at all (at Starbucks, because their employees get full benefits :kickass:, or if the barista is too busy talking to their friends to pay attention to their customers).

I was shocked when I moved here that baristas had tip jars, but I was one for 3 years and the wages aren't really enough to live on in the city even if they're minimum wage, and the tips aren't anywhere near those of restaurant servers, so I reward great coffee making - it also increases your odds of the barista remembering you and going out of their way to make a fab drink every time.

Bars - $1 per drink or 20%, whichever is greater


I'm embarrassed to say that I had never heard of tipping massage therapists before a thread here a few years ago. I still have never tipped a massage therapist....I guess I could see tipping a massage therapist in a hotel or spa, but that's not the kind of massage I'm interested in. I go to independent LMTs, most of whom work out of their homes, and for many years I got a "dancer discount"... it would feel strange to then add on when they set the price and they aren't paying a percentage to some other company.

I've never gone to a hair salon where the person who washes my hair is different from the person who cuts/colors it. I feel less confident about how I tip at the hair place - I think i tip around 20%, sometimes I feel like it's not enough, others like I'm being really extravagant (2 people I work with go to the same place and they tip about half what I do).

mkats
09-10-2011, 09:03 PM
Ah, the bellman reminds me of something else.

Do you tip if they help you but it wasn't asked for? When I (and a bunch of fellow students) were leaving Peru and disembarked at the airport, these guys appeared out of nowhere and more or less hauled our stuff to the check-in line without us asking and then proceeded to follow us demanding a tip. I ended up giving mine some just to make him go away, but the other girls flatly refused to pay, and the guys followed us through the security line going "Tip! Tip! Tip!" for a good 10-15 minutes. Man, that was awkward...

Allen
09-10-2011, 09:08 PM
Bars - $1 per drink or 20%, whichever is greater


In cases where I don't run a tab, but I know I'm going to have a few drinks, I give the bartender a 5 on the first drink. After that, I almost never have to wait to get a drink and my drinks are always strong.

I've often wondered about the shampoo person myself. For a long time, I went to a good friend of mine who had shampooed my hair as well as cutting it. Since moving here last year, I've been going to the same person at a salon and she always has an assistant shampoo my hair. I asked her if I should tip the assistant and she said that if I did, I'd probably get a nice scalp massage, but if I didn't it was no big deal because most people didn't.

milanessa
09-10-2011, 09:14 PM
Do you tip if they help you but it wasn't asked for? When I (and a bunch of fellow students) were leaving Peru and disembarked at the airport, these guys appeared out of nowhere and more or less hauled our stuff to the check-in line without us asking and then proceeded to follow us demanding a tip. I ended up giving mine some just to make him go away, but the other girls flatly refused to pay, and the guys followed us through the security line going "Tip! Tip! Tip!" for a good 10-15 minutes. Man, that was awkward...

They saw you coming. :rofl: In that case you pretty much have to rip the bags out of their hands if you don't want help and/or say NO forcefully. No pretty much works everywhere if you don't know the local language. On the other hand, if you want the help then tip.

Allen
09-10-2011, 09:17 PM
They saw you coming. :rofl: In that case you pretty much have to rip the bags out of their hands if you don't want help and/or say NO forcefully. No pretty much works everywhere if you don't know the local language. On the other hand, if you want the help then tip.

The last time I was flying through Detroit, a guy grabbed my bag up and hoisted it on to a cart. I told him that I didn't have any cash on me to tip him and without even looking, he unceremoniously pushed my bag off the cart and sped away.

cruisin
09-10-2011, 09:21 PM
Is a hair stylist an euphemism for the person who washes your hair?

No, the hair stylist is the person who colors, cuts, and/or blow dries your hair. The shampoo person is usually in beauty school, and watching/learning.


Because I was really surprised to find out you are supposed to tip that person, too. Which I find absolutely ridiculous. If they have an extra person sweeping the floor, should I tip them too? That would be 4 people already. And the owner now even if they did nothing? Haha.

:lol: No, you only tip the person who actually works on you. But, sometimes in a very busy salon, one person might put on your color and if (s)he's busy, someone else will wash it. then you wind up tipping the stylist, the person who applies the color, and the person who washes it off. You don't tip the owner unless they are the person who does your hair, and then only if you feel it's appropriate.



And I find the general standard of food service in France much better than the US. Just saying. :shuffle:

I found the food service in Paris to be generally poor, bordering on rude. I rarely find that in the US. The food service in Italy, even in the tiniest of places, is always excellent.

allezfred
09-10-2011, 09:31 PM
I found the food service in Paris to be generally poor, bordering on rude.

It was you. :saint:

IceJunkie
09-10-2011, 09:37 PM
:rolleyes:

http://www.dol.gov/whd/state/tipped.htm#foot1

What's with the eye roll? In Texas (and many other states), waiters make 2.13 an hour.

Your employer is suppose to compensate you if you don't make an average of standard minimum wage per hour, but in my experience this isn't always the case. At the end of the night you have to report what you made. Though I have had on separate occasions and at different restaurants, managers alter the servers' tip input so upper management will be happy. Luckily most of us had saved our receipts and it was corrected, and they of course blamed it on a technical glitch. Anyway, end of my rant there....

That being said, it isn't like most waiters are getting paid minimum wage plus a bunch of other tips. Plus there is usually some form of tip share for the hosts, expos and cooks that the waiters share.

I'm all for what is done in Europe and other places - just give the waitstaff a base hourly wage and forget tipping.I think this really lets a lot of restaurants off the hook as far as compensation of their employees and puts the weight of doing so on the patron. I don't think it keeps the servers any more "in check" than if they got their income off tips. I've found that you can give average service and get a great tip, and give excellent service and get bad tip. There is probably only a marginal correlation, so long as the service isn't terribly bad, and in that case the server would get fired anyway.

BigB08822
09-10-2011, 10:04 PM
By the way, my opinion on tipping hair stylists is much more relaxed. Some hairstylists work for themselves and therefore keep much more of their take from a client than someone who works as an employee and gives the salon 50%. Of course nothing is free, stylists who work for themselves may have rent space, booth rental, product use, etc to factor in but they still keep well over 50% So it kind of depends who is doing my hair as to how much I tip. I know many people don't tip salon owners, for example, and actually many salon owners will simply not accept tips.

milanessa
09-10-2011, 10:12 PM
What's with the eye roll? In Texas (and many other states), waiters make 2.13 an hour.



The eye roll is for your ridiculous assertion that wait staff make $2.13 an hour in Texas without the caveat that tips are on top of that. I'm not against tipping (I tip generously as a matter of fact) and I'm not against the whole tipping environment being overturned by requiring that everyone making a living wage. I am against the intellectually dishonest crap that people spew when they talk about making $2.13 an hour.

my little pony
09-10-2011, 10:43 PM
Maybe they need to unionize. ;)

i once worked in a place that tried to do that and everyone was fired. they paid to import an entire staff from another state just to avoid it.

skatemommy
09-10-2011, 10:46 PM
If I have an extended stay vacation, I will leave a tip for the maids. One night - no. I waitressed in high school and college - we got lower than minimum wage and had to report an 8% tip on every food and beverage sale as income. So if someone stiffed us on a tip, the IRS still assumed we got a minimum tip of 8% and had to pay taxes on such.