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Christina
09-07-2011, 08:55 PM
So it's been ten years since I've had to do a resume. What's the current "style" that professionals use? The last I knew, we had an objective statement and then did a chronological listing of employment.

Does anyone have a link to the latest and greatest style? I've been looking, but I'm seriously clueless. I just need to attach it to a city application, so it's not going out far and wide.

Prancer
09-07-2011, 10:03 PM
I think the chronological style is still preferred in most governments. The only "new" resume style that I know is the hybrid style (http://www.top-sales-jobs.com/resume-format.html), but I wouldn't say that it's preferred.

Skittl1321
09-07-2011, 10:20 PM
We haven't seen as many objective statements lately. Instead people are doing a few bullet points if skills summary.

Christina
09-08-2011, 01:00 AM
Thanks you guys. I figured I couldn't go wrong with the old style, but I just wanted to double check. I review applications at my current job, but it's all online stuff and we aren't allowed to look at the resume.

Thanks again!!

GarrAarghHrumph
09-08-2011, 01:20 AM
Chronological is still preferred, but if you have gaps, there are other styles that are also acceptable if you need them. You don't need to have an "objectives" statement at all, if you don't want to. I prefer resumes without them.

A skills section isn't a bad idea, as others mentioned, but it's not required. Chronological is fine.

MacMadame
09-08-2011, 01:45 AM
We haven't seen as many objective statements lately. Instead people are doing a few bullet points if skills summary.

^^^THIS

I'm job hunting and have worked with two resume writers and both of them did this.

Christina
09-08-2011, 03:06 AM
Glad to hear it about the objective statement. I always want to put: to find a job I don't hate that pays more than I make now.

I mean, what else are we all really looking for when it comes down to it?

KatieC
09-08-2011, 03:20 AM
Glad to hear it about the objective statement. I always want to put: to find a job I don't hate that pays more than I make now.

I mean, what else are we all really looking for when it comes down to it?

I agree with that, but I'd add - the ability to move around when you want, as long as you get your job done. In fact, just give me the job and a deadline and I'm happy. That way I choose when to take a break, when to eat, and if I can squeeze in two hours to skate at lunchtime.

Prefer chronological myself, for resumes. Also to read them.

Quintuple
09-08-2011, 07:44 AM
After you read any advice in a resume book or online, you will then encounter the completely opposite idea. It's frustrating.

In the end, try to read your resume as if you're reading someone else's. Is it clear? Is it too wordy? Boring? Show-offy? Believable? Cleanly designed? And finally, put yourself into the reality of most recruiters and managers: "Can I get the gist of it if I glance at it for 10 seconds?"

Japanfan
09-08-2011, 08:05 AM
I edit resumes and really don't like the sentence/quasi sentence structure used in some objective statements. To me it's too wordy and there is too little white space, but I gather that this wordiness is currently in vogue.

BaileyCatts
09-08-2011, 09:47 AM
^^ So what do you think of an objective line that just says "seeking a position as an administrative assistant" when you are obviously applying for secretary jobs. Is that too, uhm ... lame? :shuffle:

Japanfan
09-08-2011, 10:46 AM
^^ So what do you think of an objective line that just says "seeking a position as an administrative assistant" when you are obviously applying for secretary jobs. Is that too, uhm ... lame? :shuffle:

I don't think it's lame but would tigthen it up to 'as administrative assistant position' and then add which something like 'which allows me to develop my time management and organizational skills'.

I think people reading resumes prefer as little text as possible and a visually appealing format - and too little white space isn't visually appealing.

vesperholly
09-08-2011, 11:19 AM
I've never put an objective on my resume. Hello, I'm applying for the job posted. To be hired for the job is my objective! A cover letter mentioning the company and position specifically should be more than sufficient, IMO.

Prancer
09-08-2011, 12:44 PM
"Can I get the gist of it if I glance at it for 10 seconds?"

I think that is the key. What is this particular job about? Do they want experience and skills or education and certification? Specific proficiencies or general competence? Whatever they want, that goes up top, in whatever form you do it.

But that is, I believe, why the chronological resume is still preferred--it's familiar (and thus easy to read) and it details experience, which is usually key.


Iadd which something like 'which allows me to develop my time management and organizational skills'.

I wouldn't add that :shuffle:. I want them to know that I already HAVE time management and organizational skills, not that I want to develop them OTJ. I'd also never use a non-restrictive clause in an objective.


I've never put an objective on my resume.

I have, but I don't think anyone reads them. I think the thinking there is to demonstrate that you have a specific goal in mind and aren't just applying for the job because it's there--even if everyone knows that, really, you are.

Aceon6
09-08-2011, 01:34 PM
I think the "rules" are different depending on amount of work experience. For those just starting out, the most common is summary, education, and paid/non-paid work experience in reverse chronological order. For "late career" folks and anyone over 40 with significant work experience, it goes summary, functional experience, reverse chronological list of paid work in the last 15 years, degrees and certifications. Everyone else, the advice upthread is good.