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maatTheViking
09-10-2011, 05:02 AM
In Denmark, service is expected to be included, and you don't tip, unless service is exceptional.

Living in the US, I used to find it annoying to figure out the tip, but after 6 years I'm used to it. What I do still find hard, is how much to tip for non-food related services. How much do I tip my hairdresser?

cruisin
09-10-2011, 02:26 PM
In Denmark, service is expected to be included, and you don't tip, unless service is exceptional.

Living in the US, I used to find it annoying to figure out the tip, but after 6 years I'm used to it. What I do still find hard, is how much to tip for non-food related services. How much do I tip my hairdresser?

That is a tough one, because you usually tip more than one person. Do you give the shampoo person a flat amount and give the stylist a %. Do you figure out a percent and give part of it to the shampoo person and the rest to the stylist? It was always protocol to not tip the stylist if they are the owner. Now, people do. Then you have salons where one person shampoos, the stylist mixes the color & someone else puts it on, then someone else shampoos that out, then the stylist cuts and blows dry. You could have 4 people to tip. Since the stylist who cuts my hair is the owner, I give her a small tip. I give the shampoo person a nice one (she also puts my color on).

Southpaw
09-10-2011, 02:47 PM
I still say the owner of the salon shouldn't get tipped.

orbitz
09-10-2011, 02:48 PM
Living in the US, I used to find it annoying to figure out the tip, but after 6 years I'm used to it. What I do still find hard, is how much to tip for non-food related services. How much do I tip my hairdresser?

I give 10-15%.

It's easy to figure out 10%. Just add a decimal before the last whole digit of your bill. Double up that amount if you want to give 20%.

Prancer
09-10-2011, 03:18 PM
That is a tough one, because you usually tip more than one person. Do you give the shampoo person a flat amount and give the stylist a %. Do you figure out a percent and give part of it to the shampoo person and the rest to the stylist? It was always protocol to not tip the stylist if they are the owner. Now, people do. Then you have salons where one person shampoos, the stylist mixes the color & someone else puts it on, then someone else shampoos that out, then the stylist cuts and blows dry. You could have 4 people to tip. Since the stylist who cuts my hair is the owner, I give her a small tip. I give the shampoo person a nice one (she also puts my color on).

How does anyone ever afford a haircut with all those people to tip?

Spartacus
09-10-2011, 03:25 PM
I love that this thread now has three separate discussions going - 80's music, hydrangeas, and tipping. :rofl:

And I love hydrangeas. Particularly PURPLE ones.
Cow tipping?:confused:

Southpaw
09-10-2011, 03:25 PM
How does anyone ever afford a haircut with all those people to tip?

No tax on haircuts, that's how.

MacMadame
09-10-2011, 03:40 PM
When there are multiple people to tip, you are supposed to tip the main person you worked with and they shared it out. In a restaurant, you don't tip the bus boys and the hostess and your waiter and the cooks in the back. You just tip your waiter.

You can use that principle anywhere including a salon.

cruisin
09-10-2011, 03:41 PM
No tax on haircuts, that's how.

True, but I would venture to say that the actual price for haircuts and color are more $$$ than in many other areas. There are salons around here that charge $150.00+ for just a hair cut and charge more if they blow it out. I don't go to a place like that, but it's still expensive. I stopped getting highlights because just couldn't afford it anymore. Fortunately, I like my hair dark, but with predominantly grey roots - touch ups are frequent. I have very thin hair, so I do not mess with coloring my own hair. I also have pretty short hair which needs more frequent trimming (again, because it's thin).

cruisin
09-10-2011, 03:42 PM
When there are multiple people to tip, you are supposed to tip the main person you worked with and they shared it out. In a restaurant, you don't tip the bus boys and the hostess and your waiter and the cooks in the back. You just tip your waiter.

You can use that principle anywhere including a salon.

If you did that around here, it would not be shared. You are expected to tip individually in a salon.

Southpaw
09-10-2011, 03:47 PM
My hairdresser moved to a salon that was waaaaaaayyyyy out of the way for me so she worked out a deal with me - if I keep coming to her then I don't have to tip her. I still tip the assistant. She shouldn't get stiffed just because my hairdresser wheedled and deedled with a client.

cruisin
09-10-2011, 04:20 PM
My hairdresser moved to a salon that was waaaaaaayyyyy out of the way for me so she worked out a deal with me - if I keep coming to her then I don't have to tip her. I still tip the assistant. She shouldn't get stiffed just because my hairdresser wheedled and deedled with a client.

So, was part of the deal that she could deedle you? :lol:

PeterG
09-10-2011, 04:29 PM
I just started a thread about tipping:

Tipping - For? Against? How Much? Yes To Waitstaff, But No To...? (http://www.fsuniverse.net/forum/showthread.php?t=80118)

It includes a "Thoughts On Tipping" poll, which is multiple choice and private, so no one will know how you vote! :)

Southpaw
09-10-2011, 05:08 PM
So, was part of the deal that she could deedle you? :lol:

Hardy har har, cruisin. Hardy har har.

PDilemma
09-10-2011, 05:45 PM
Madonna and U2 continued to make relevant, current music. They also offer a good show, still, vs. just coming out and playing their sentimental hits. Now, the Rolling Stones sold out tours for years based on an old playlist. So, sure, maybe some groups sell for that reason, but not all of them do. Madonna doesn't. U2 doesn't. I bet Bon Jovi doesn't, either.

.

I saw U2 in July. There were teenagers and college aged kids among the crowd of 30 and 40ish aged people on the field. And the young ones knew every song. I don't think they are entirely nostalgia or irrelevant quite yet. As for How to Build an Atomic Bomb which someone called "arena music" earlier in the thread, setting aside "Vertigo" (which I never liked but it certainly was a fun song live), the album is much more varied and complex.

And Springsteen's The Rising album should not be derided as one song "riding the coattails of 9/11". It was a complete and complex album as well. But I think in the mp3 age, we've forgotten how to think of an album as a complete work which hurts artists/bands that are still recording in that mindset. The revolution of the album as a unified concept begun with Pet Sounds and Sgt. Pepper is dying or dead.