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BigB08822
12-06-2011, 04:39 AM
I can apply for a student ticket although I doubt I would get one. They still cost almost $300. $234 for the lower section and $300 for the upper section. Yes, I typed that correctly, the lower section is cheaper. Who the hell knows why.... I would have to go alone and right now I do not have $300 so with my luck I would be picked and not be able to afford it, lol I kind of want to apply just to see...

PDilemma
12-06-2011, 06:07 PM
I have read some decent arguments against a big playoff system, the major one being that it asks so much of the players, what with the wear and tear and risk of injury (I do feel a little icky about exploitation of college athletes). Other reasons are mostly logistical, like worries about being able to fill a stadium on short notice when fan bases have to travel long distances, etc ($$$). Plus the bowl system allows so many teams to be able to hoist a trophy at the end of the season, even if it is from the Viagra.com Salad Bowl or whatever it is we're down to.
Too bad nobody will ever agree to do anything; we'll be stuck with the beauty pagent system forever.


I read one proposal that uses conference champs and runners-up to create a 16 game playoff (including all conferences rather than just the current BCS conferences). In order to have less "wear and tear" on athletes, why not eliminate the non-conference games--start conference play immediately, ending it in November and have play-offs in December culminating in a championship at the same time as the current BCS final. Or there is the division 2 playoff model--and those athletes survive. So do basketball players through a tournament that keeps getting bigger and longer for those teams that make the Final Four.

I highly doubt that fans traveling or selling tickets would be a huge problem. The wealthier supporters of teams are going to pony up the money and get there--they do it for other sports. Most make their bowl plans in a day or so once tickets are on sale around here and travel agents here have packages available within about 15 minutes of a bowl destination being announced.

The bottom line is that the current system is lining the pockets of those running the bowls--all of them not just the BCS bowls. And all the talk of protecting athletes has nothing to do with it. It's window dressing because the real reason is not so palatable.

BigB08822
12-06-2011, 09:14 PM
Most of the play off scenarios result in 2 to 4 extra games, AT MOST. Some result in only 1 or 2. It depends on if you earn a bye, how many teams are in the play off, etc. It can easily be done without adding too many games. PDilemma is spot on that it has nothing to do with the players and everything to do with $$ but they will never talk about that.

zippy
12-07-2011, 03:07 AM
^Obviously the real reasons for those who are actually deciding this stuff are over money and not the welfare of the players. I was referring to my own reasons for supporting a smaller plus one system that involves just one extra game. I don't think shortening the regular season or dumping out of conference games is going to happen, and I'm not much in favor of that either - it could create a situation where people don't bother to tune in much for the regular season, and most teams would have their season cut short. I know that's the opposite of my argument about too long a season creating injury risk, but I'm not sure most of the teams would enjoy going to only 8 or so games while others keep playing, mostly for the sake of what the fans want. Under the current system, everybody plays the same amount, with about half (I believe) going on to a bowl game. Traditional rivalries are at least as important as the post-season games, which is something that makes college football fun and unique.

If the regular season isn't shortened, a playoff involving 4 extra games is an extra month of football, during a time when these guys who are supposedly college students are supposed to be studying for finals, etc. I'm not sure it's comparable to look at the playoff models that Division II or even the FCS uses, as the game at the top of college football is much more physical. For players who are gunning for a spot in the NFL, the shelf life for some positions such as running backs is so short as it is.

As for the issue of attendance, sure, wealthy fans might be able to manage a last-minute trip, but it's hard for most people to get last minute plane tickets, hotels, etc, if you only have 6 days notice once your team makes it through a playoff round. It's not a good comparison to look at the way travel packages for bowls are snapped up, since people have a month to plan their trip. Attendance falloffs have been a problem with the FCS playoffs.

Fridge_Break
12-07-2011, 04:52 AM
Just skimmed the last few posts, but I work at a travel agency and had someone in today looking to go for the game in NOLA and almost all of the hotels within a close proximity to the arena and downtown are sold out already. The Visitors & Convention Bureau said everything filled up almost immediately. The only place that I got ahold of that had rooms available were going for $450/night with a 3-night minimum.

BigB08822
12-07-2011, 05:51 AM
The rooms in Nola have been sold out for months. People booked rooms as soon as they could and then release them as their teams are eliminated. Those rooms are then booked up immediately.

PDilemma
12-07-2011, 05:16 PM
The costs of attending these games, be they bowl games, conference title games, whatever...is prohibitive to most people anyway and a playoff would not be any different than that. As for time...the Big 10 Leaders Division wasn't decided until a week before the title game with the Wisconsin-Penn State game, and I hadn't heard that that resulted in empty seats in Indianapolis. Fans with the means to travel will get to these games.

I assume you're basing your attendance/interest issue for regular season games on the notion that if teams do not have to be undefeated to play for a championship that fans won't care about the season. That is the argument that I know BCS people make. That makes no sense. First of all, if that were the case, why would fans flock to the meaningless bowl games? Why do teams not see a huge drop in attendance after their first loss every season? Why do conference title games sell out when one or both teams come in with losses? I think fans want to watch their teams regardless. I know people who have skipped family weddings and other milestone events to go to a spring scrimmage here to see what next year's team looks like. And this isn't the only place with a spring game (aka a scrimmage) that sells thousands of tickets.

Furthermore, a playoff system using conference standings would make the regular season matter for more teams, as they played for a spot in the playoffs. Not just the BCS conferences and not just the year's media-anointed teams and not just the two or three with a shot at going undefeated. That would sell more regular season tickets.

BigB08822
12-07-2011, 05:28 PM
In Louisiana you simply do not schedule a wedding or anything on the day of a football game. That is a big no-no and anyone who skips out on your event is more than justified. That wouldn't change if we were in a losing season, either. I don't know if people can understand it if they don't experience it first hand. It isn't just about watching your team win. The entire day is a big event and at LSU there are thousands (even 100,000+ depending on the opponent) who go tailgating but do not even have a ticket to the game.

PDilemma
12-07-2011, 05:37 PM
In Louisiana you simply do not schedule a wedding or anything on the day of a football game. That is a big no-no and anyone who skips out on your event is more than justified. That wouldn't change if we were in a losing season, either. I don't know if people can understand it if they don't experience it first hand. It isn't just about watching your team win. The entire day is a big event and at LSU there are thousands (even 100,000+ depending on the opponent) who go tailgating but do not even have a ticket to the game.

Same thing here. Although, I have to say I find skipping family milestone events for the spring game a bit excessive. And LSU and everyone else have nothing on Nebraska's sell out streak. Stadium gets bigger, sell outs continue. It dates to November 3, 1962.

A friend who is not a native Nebraskan scheduled her wedding here on the day of the first game of the season this fall at the exact same time. About 40 people out of over 100 invited showed up and half of them skipped the ceremony and showed up for the reception during the 4th quarter. She had no idea that would happen and didn't believe people who warned her.

PrincessLeppard
12-07-2011, 07:48 PM
It's *college* football. It doesn't need a playoff system. At all.

My cousin scheduled her wedding on the same day as Nebraska vs. Notre Dame because "it was the only Saturday in the fall the venue was available." Duh. The wedding was in the morning, thankfully, and then everyone cleared out and went to the game. When 3/4 of the family has season tickets, don't schedule your wedding on a home game. And she IS a native Nebraskan. ;)

PDilemma
12-07-2011, 07:58 PM
It's *college* football. It doesn't need a playoff system. At all.



Every other college sport has a post season tournament to determine a legitimate national champion. Including football on other levels. It is absurd--and actually not fair to the athletes--that Division I football is left to this subjective mess of a system because a bunch of people are making money off of it.

Or do you think that the other sports should eliminate their playoffs/tourneys as well because it is college? (That would not be good for Omaha, incidentally).

OnyxRose81
12-07-2011, 08:29 PM
There is no good reason why NCAA football shouldn't have a playoff system. The BCS makes no sense, except to keep certain programs at top even when they're not playing well. I have no idea why this was put in place but it needs to be gone as of yesterday.

PrincessLeppard
12-07-2011, 08:32 PM
Or do you think that the other sports should eliminate their playoffs/tourneys as well because it is college? (That would not be good for Omaha, incidentally).

I realize that. I'm just of the mind that the kids should be students first, athletes second. I think the NCAA Basketball tournament is ridiculous, but it brings in a lot of money, as does the College World Series, so they will never go away no matter what my opinion is. :)

PDilemma
12-07-2011, 09:07 PM
I realize that. I'm just of the mind that the kids should be students first, athletes second. I think the NCAA Basketball tournament is ridiculous, but it brings in a lot of money, as does the College World Series, so they will never go away no matter what my opinion is. :)

I don't think I need to mention that I think that. But I usually get attacked when I bring it up here or anywhere else. The mere mention of sports being an out of control priority in American education from about 7th grade through all sizes and sorts of colleges is usually enough to get a person labeled an anti-American bitter pitiful old bitch. ("bitter" came up here last time I expressed the opinion--because my asserting that schools' money should be spent on education more than on sports was only born of my own "bitterness" and had nothing to do with a lifelong belief that education should be the primary objective of a school...which I need to let go of because it is apparently absurd).

But...in spite of all of that, sports is not going away. So we should make it fairer.

A playoff system that also shortened the regular season (as I suggested above) could do wonders to calm down the insanity surrounding college football. A system that used conference championships/runners up would eliminate the ridiculous pressure of needing to be undefeated to win a title and level the playing field to some degree. Michigan State, for example, would have made such a play off with a 10-3 record. A fine example of the lessening of hysteria that a playoff system could bring--look at the histrionics around here over a 9-3 season. If that season could get you into a playoff for a title, there could be less pressure to win at all costs.

As for the baseball playoffs and the CWS--it takes place almost entirely after classes end for the regular academic year, so it is not taking students out of classes to the degree other sports do. And since Major League Baseball actually has a minor league system and actually signs players who have not played in college, baseball is not a great example of the corruption in college sports. The combination of an absurd system for determining titles and the function of essentially being a minor league system for the NFL has corrupted division I football.

numbers123
12-07-2011, 09:20 PM
In Louisiana you simply do not schedule a wedding or anything on the day of a football game.


My cousin scheduled her wedding on the same day as Nebraska vs. Notre Dame because "it was the only Saturday in the fall the venue was available." Duh. The wedding was in the morning, thankfully, and then everyone cleared out and went to the game. When 3/4 of the family has season tickets, don't schedule your wedding on a home game. And she IS a native Nebraskan. ;)

My son and dil were going to get married on a Nebraska football game day, but my son said that the bride and mother of the groom would not be totally engaged in the ceremony because we would be wearing ear buds to listen to the game. He was sure that both of us would yell "NOOOOOOOOOOOOOO" or "YESSSSSSSSSSS" at inappropriate times. :P And he was probably right. So an early August wedding it was.