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IceAlisa
08-12-2011, 08:08 PM
I'm trying to get my head around the image of Christopher Noth or Meloni or Jerry Orbach in spike heels. :yikes: :lol: But I actually do know what numbers is talking about with the female detectives/medical examiners/whatever on some crime shows, e.g. Castle, Body of Proof, etc.

Or Vincent D'Onofrio. Yeah, there is a relatively show called Rizzoli And Isles where the ME wears heels. I haven't seen it but there were previews during L&O. People seem to be up in arms against high heels for some reason.

skatingfan5
08-12-2011, 08:16 PM
Or Vincent D'Onofrio. Yeah, there is a relatively show called Rizzoli And Isles where the ME wears heels. I haven't seen it but there were previews during L&O. People seem to be up in arms against high heels for some reason.To me it just looks ridiculous to see someone tottering around on 4" heels while walking on loose gravel, in muddy or rutted vacant lots, and various other crime scenes. Some might disagree, but to me it doesn't really seem to be what one would wear "in the field".

IceAlisa
08-12-2011, 08:22 PM
To me it just looks ridiculous to see someone tottering around on 4" heels while walking on loose gravel, in muddy or rutted vacant lots, and various other crime scenes. Some might disagree, but to me it doesn't really seem to be what one would wear "in the field".

That's true but I just pulled up an episode of Rizzoli And Isles on the TNT site, and Angie Harmon is wearing black slacks, comfortable looking boots with a slight heel, and layered t-shirts. The ME is wearing a ridiculous suit with ruffles and a camisole with hearts. Hearts! What is she, five?

Do MEs go to crime scenes? If so, 4 inch heels are certainly not the most sensible choice.

Prancer
08-12-2011, 08:28 PM
That's true but I just pulled up an episode of Rizzoli And Isles on the TNT site, and Angie Harmon is wearing black slacks, comfortable looking boots with a slight heel, and layered t-shirts. The ME is wearing a ridiculous suit with ruffles and a camisole with hearts. Hearts! What is she, five?

Rizzoli is the tough, working class jockette cop and Isles is the upper class girly-girl ME. The clothes are shorthand for this.

I know because I've read one of the books. :D

IceAlisa
08-12-2011, 08:30 PM
Rizzoli is the tough, working class jockette and Isles is the upper class girly-girl ME. The clothes are shorthand for this.

I know because I've read one of the books. :D

Was it good? I like detective stuff quite a bit.

Prancer
08-12-2011, 08:38 PM
Was it good? I like detective stuff quite a bit.

R&I are Tess Gerritson creations.

http://www.amazon.com/Tess-Gerritsen/e/B000AQ4IHU/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_1

I'm not a particular fan of hers, TBH, but it wasn't the worst mystery/suspense I've ever read.

IceAlisa
08-12-2011, 08:42 PM
Thanks! Says she is a physician. I wonder if she is a pathologist. That way her writing could be authentic.

skatingfan5
08-12-2011, 08:44 PM
Do MEs go to crime scenes? If so, 4 inch heels are certainly not the most sensible choice.They do on ABC's Body of Proof (http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_N-yfJ-5x7pU/TITVxZp44eI/AAAAAAAAAEs/BTKpEZZcydo/s640/Body-Of-Proof-Cast-ABC.jpg), 4" heels and all. Dana Delaney wears the heels in the field, while Jeri Ryan, as her boss, mainly just struts around the halls. :P

nubka
08-12-2011, 08:56 PM
I enjoy both reading and watching television, but if I HAD to choose, it would be reading. I have books in my collection that are like dear old friends to me, and I can't imagine ever giving them up (I tend to re-read books that I really like a lot!)

Having said that, it would be a tough decision. I would definately miss television/DVD's.... :(

Japanfan
08-12-2011, 11:01 PM
It's a given that more people watch television, but if we are talking about the merits of television versus reading, why does it matter if one is more popular or common? If you are comparing the nutritional value of eating quinoa versus eating Big Macs, it doesn't matter that more people eat Big Macs. That has no effect at all on the nutritional value.


You gave the number of readers for Da Vinci Code and it seemed your point was with regard to the number of readers versus number of TV watchers.

I think the greater numbers speaks to the ease of watching television in general and as I've already said, to the effect of TV in terms of the vibrating emissions.




I could argue that successful book formulas are replicated endlessly, too, but again, I don't really see why this makes any difference in terms of whether it is better to read or watch TV.
Much like The Da Vinci Code, with its very short chapters, cliffhanger endings, and repetition of plot points at the beginning of each chapter?


I have already explained why I found Da Vinci Code more challenging than Entertainment Tonight and some reality TV.



Is it? By what measure? I haven't seen ET since Mary Hart was a mere slip of a girl because I think it's boring as hell. I haven't read Robin Cook, either, so I can't compare, but I find it hard to believe a thriller is worse.


Juvenile writing, poor characterization, and terrible dialogue. Some of Cook's earlier thrillers had okay stories, but they have become far less thrilling over the years.

Prancer
08-13-2011, 01:37 AM
You gave the number of readers for Da Vinci Code and it seemed your point was with regard to the number of readers versus number of TV watchers.

Which I said in direct response to your comment about how popular reality TV is and how such TV shows seem to cater to the lowest common denominator. My point was that a lot of really popular reading material caters the the same audience. I don't believe one is superior to the other just because one happens to involve print instead of video. If it is, the difference must be measured in millimeters.


I have already explained why I found Da Vinci Code more challenging than Entertainment Tonight and some reality TV.

And I explained why the same is not true for me--or rather, why I don't think it's true for me. Without an actual brain scan, it's really impossible to tell how engaged the mind is.


Juvenile writing, poor characterization, and terrible dialogue. Some of Cook's earlier thrillers had okay stories, but they have become far less thrilling over the years.

I actually read one of his early thrillers (Coma), now that I think about it, and I wasn't at all impressed, but I bet I would still find his books more interesting and entertaining than Entertainment Tonight.

Japanfan
08-13-2011, 01:44 AM
I actually read one of his early thrillers (Coma), now that I think about it, and I wasn't at all impressed, but I bet I would still find his books more interesting and entertaining than Entertainment Tonight.

'Coma' was made into a movie and gave Cook a name and an audience. But his later books are truly, truly awful.

jlai
08-13-2011, 01:46 AM
I have not read Da Vinci Code but I think there's some literary merit in pageturners. The author's storytelling technique has to be stellar for the page to turn.

In some way the Harry Potters are pageturners too, and Rowling certainly has her own stereotypes (about fat people for instance)

Prancer
08-13-2011, 01:58 AM
I have not read Da Vinci Code but I think there's some literary merit to pageturners. The author's storytelling technique has to be stellar for the page to turn.

The TV show has to create enough interest for the finger to not click the button, too.

jlai
08-13-2011, 02:10 AM
The TV show has to create enough interest for the finger to not click the button, too.

I'm trying to think of a TV-equivalent of Da Vinci Code. I don't think the normal TV drama are comparable since they are basically short stories with similar plots. I guess the TV equivalent will be an exciting movie made for TV.

TV drama like Law and Order are more like Agatha Christie's short stories. It's more repetitive--but I read them anyway. :D And occasionally there's a good one.

I just finished the last season of Lark Rise to Candleford. I definitely noticed a lot of repetition but occasionally there's an outstanding episode, like the second to last one about Mrs. Brown on the issue of femininity.