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Satellitegirl
08-10-2011, 02:41 PM
I read some as a kid...especially the babysitters club, and the scary books by R.L. Stine, but my mom's main thing was "go outside and play." I plan on encouraging that more than anything else, if I have a kid(although I doubt I ever will.)

Hannahclear
08-10-2011, 02:41 PM
More than anything regarding TV, what I wanted my children to learn is how to voluntarily turn off the TV. If there is a show they want to watch, they should turn on the TV when that show is on, watch the show, then turn off the TV. The TV should not be on for hours at a time with no particular reason. I am not sure how I managed to do it, but my kids seemed to have learned how to do that (so far anyway).


I totally agree. My parents were "TV on all the time" people. I'm glad it didn't transfer to me.

I do enjoy a bit of trashy TV here and there, but I watch on Hulu or something similar. And when it's over, it's over. However, I do spend too much time online sometimes. :shuffle:

jeffisjeff
08-10-2011, 02:42 PM
Despite that, I have always had excellent verbal skills and vocabulary.

Yeah, he has a very good vocabulary. Probably because my husband and I aren't afraid to use "big" words and also because son doesn't hesitate to ask what a word means. My husband and I often discuss our research in front of the kids (e.g., at dinner), so they've learned some rather obscure terms. :lol:

mmscfdcsu
08-10-2011, 02:47 PM
I don't think that any tv is appropriate before age 6 or 7. After that, 2- 10 or so hours per week is probably fine. I watched way too much tv as a kid, though I also read constantly. In grade school I read all the plays that I could find, in addition to nonfiction and novels. By Jr. High I was buying at least three or four books a week. Never really got the hang of using the library. I have cut way back on my computer time over the past few months. I am really enjoying the peace and freedom from distraction. Just having windows and door open, hearing the natural sounds. I know that I could not handle the noise of a tv or radio constantly running. I'm finding that I have much less anxiety and depression since cutting back on screen time. I am sleeping great.

GarrAarghHrumph
08-10-2011, 02:48 PM
I both read a lot and watched a lot of tv when I was growing up. I now still do both. I see no reason why you can't have both in your life, if that's what you want. I see no reason why you have to force yourself to *not* watch tv. I feel there can be a balance.

I've talked about this before re: film and books - there are some items given to us via media, be they film or book or tv show, that are so important to their time, so much a part of our culture, that not at least being familiar with them makes you an outsider. If that's okay with you, then that's fine. For your kids - to not be able to discuss the latest hot show, or the latest episode of AI with their friends - that makes them different, and in a way, an outsider. Unattached from certain aspects of our culture. If that's understood and okay, then that's one thing. But is it okay - is it okay with you? Is it okay with them?

But why must it be either/or - either tv or reading? Why can it not be both? Why can you not, for example, have perhaps one night per week when there is no tv or computer use, and the family comes together to play board games and perhaps to read?

danceronice
08-10-2011, 02:50 PM
Why is it one or the other? I do both at the same time. (I always have the TV on, mostly because I need the noise and I can't concentrate with music on.) I don't really remember my TV watching habits as a kid (probably not a lot) but I've always read, since I was three. Or if I'm painting or making jewelry or something.

(And I never get the 'all that's on is junk' stuff, either--if you get cable or satelite just put on History or Discovery or one of those. I almost never have the networks or "entertainment" channels on. I don't need to watch the Kardashians if there's a James Bond marathon on Sleuth. Still fluff, but not actively amoral fluff.)

Jenny
08-10-2011, 02:55 PM
I don't think that any tv is appropriate before age 6 or 7.

Why not?

Not sure what the choices are now, but when I was a kid we had Sesame Street, Schoolhouse Rock and the Electric Company - I can still remember some of the songs and skits that taught me about numbers, letters, grammar and spelling. With only one tv in the house, I ended up watching a lot of PBS, and I think those were good too. Even the entertaining stuff that I watched on Saturday mornings on my own or with my parents at night wasn't particularly harmful - happy memories in fact of watching Bugs Bunny or even Carol Burnett as a family and laughing together.

mmscfdcsu
08-10-2011, 03:09 PM
Why not?
.

There is some research out there indicating that there may be a connection between early television and ADHD. Pediatricians advise absolutely no television before age 2. http://www.ldanatl.org/newsbriefs/print_television.asp

The amount of growth that takes place in the human brain during the first five years of life is huge. There is concern about how much television watching interferes and changes the wiring. Plus, as a therapist, I'm concerned about all of the things that the child is not doing that he should be doing while he is sitting passively in front of a television set.



http://www.pbs.org/parents/childrenandmedia/article-faq.html

Jenny
08-10-2011, 03:15 PM
I don't think that any tv is appropriate before age 6 or 7.


There is some research out there indicating that there may be a connection between early television and ADHD. Pediatricians advise absolutely no television before age 2. http://www.ldanatl.org/newsbriefs/print_television.asp

The amount of growth that takes place in the human brain during the first five years of life is huge. There is concern about how much television watching interferes and changes the wiring. Plus, as a therapist, I'm concerned about all of the things that the child is not doing that he should be doing while he is sitting passively in front of a television set.

I can see limiting tv before age 2, but your earlier post said age 6 or 7, when kids have already been in school for several years.

Given that millions of us grew up watching tv as youngsters (among other activities) and are now fully functioning adults, I have to say I'm skeptical about this research.

Sure, if watching tv is all a kid does, that's not a good thing - I think most of us are agreeing that balance is key, and I don't see how watching a bit of tv before age 6 or 7 is going to have long term negative effects if the kid is also reading, playing inside and out, spending time with other kids, etc.

Garden Kitty
08-10-2011, 03:15 PM
Not sure what the choices are now, but when I was a kid we had Sesame Street, Schoolhouse Rock and the Electric Company .

How dreary to imagine a childhood with no Conjunction Junction (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mkO87mkgcNo&feature=related)

Jenny
08-10-2011, 03:16 PM
How dreary to imagine a childhood with no Conjunction Junction (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mkO87mkgcNo&feature=related)

Exactly! When my niece and nephew were little, we got them the whole collection on video, and I think my sister enjoyed them as much as her kids did :)

mmscfdcsu
08-10-2011, 03:20 PM
I can see limiting tv before age 2, but your earlier post said age 6 or 7, when kids have already been in school for several years.


Sure, if watching tv is all a kid does, that's not a good thing - I think most of us are agreeing that balance is key, and I don't see how watching a bit of tv before age 6 or 7 is going to have long term negative effects if the kid is also reading, playing inside and out, spending time with other kids, etc.

Yes, balance is key. What is unhealthy for a kid IMO is to grow up in a household where the tv is on every single day. Mommy watches all the daytime dreck. There is no getting used to peace and natural sounds. The child never learns to self soothe and learn self-reflection. The bots just keep turning the channel trying to find something to occupy themselves. Turning the set on 2 or 3 times a week is probably fine.
But...since everyone is way too familiar with my thoughts on this subject, I'm not posting any more in this thread.

IceAlisa
08-10-2011, 05:09 PM
Reading is another issue. My daughter loves to read, but son "hates" to read. He seems to be doing fine in school, with no particular concerns regarding his reading ability. So I am trying to gently encourage, but not to push him too much.

Reminiscent of Prancer's situation: my husband never reads anything unless it's a manual for an electronic device and he barely reads those. Yet he is one of the smartest people I've ever met.

Same goes for the guy I dated in college (it's amazing I was out enough to meet people and date). He didn't pass the 2nd year writing test and had to do remedial writing with my help. Yet his math and science abilities were curve busting. He'd demolish the curve after having flipped through the textbook for 15 minutes, lying on the floor, watching The Loony Tunes. Just sayin'. Medical schools were begging him to matriculate but he chose computer engineering instead.

And both men are successful professionals with advanced degrees.
Reading is great but it's not an end-all be-all.

I agree with Tinami. TV does have some great things to offer as well, many of which are on PBS, the Discovery Channel, the History Channel, etc. Some things have to be appreciated visually and aurally.

There are a few important genres that benefit from being watched: poetry and plays. I remember hearing and seeing Kevin Bacon (?) recite a Pablo Neruda poem and really appreciating Neruda for the first time. Poetry is meant to be heard.

Watching Kenneth Branagh in Hamlet was a eye-opening experience.

Prancer
08-10-2011, 05:22 PM
I'm never quite sure why reading is considered the be-all and the end-all for children.

I think that's a combination of people insisting that what they value is inherently valuable and the fact that reading is associated with brainy people who do well in school.


There are a few important genres that benefit from being watched: poetry and plays. I remember hearing and seeing Kevin Bacon (?) recite a Pablo Neruda poem and really appreciating Neruda for the first time. Poetry is meant to be heard.

:lol: Every time I teach lit, someone will say "How come when I am at home and I read these poems, they never make sense, but when I come to class and you read them, they suddenly do?"

It's because I read them out loud.

Vagabond
08-10-2011, 05:42 PM
Thoughts? And do people know of actual evidence demonstrating the superiority of one over the other?

All I know is what I've read. :shuffle:

For kids, reducing TV viewing may be a key to preventing obesity (http://news.stanford.edu/news/1999/may5/tvweight-55.html)


A Stanford study suggests that, for grade-school children, watching less television may be a key to limiting weight gain. Children who were involved in a one-year curriculum to reduce their TV viewing gained significantly less body fat than a control group of their peers....

Robinson said one possibility was that the kids were performing more low-level activities * more energetic than simply sitting still but less energetic than walking. Freed from the TV, the children may simply have been moving around more, though this kind of activity is extremely difficult to measure, Robinson said.

However, the difference may also stem from changes in the number of meals the kids ate in front of the TV. The children at the TV-reduction school significantly decreased the number of meals they ate while watching TV. Even a small change in caloric intake could account for the difference in weight gain, Robinson noted. For example, the calorie equivalent of one additional regular soft drink per day translates into a yearly weight gain of about 15 pounds, he said.

Can Reading Help Kids Lose Weight? (http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1847340,00.html)


The study's experimental group included 31 obese girls aged 9 to 13, who were enrolled in the Healthy Lifestyles Program at Duke Children's Hospital, a comprehensive family-centered weight loss plan that addresses patients' medical, dietary and behavioral needs. The girls read a novel called Lake Rescue, whose protagonist is an overweight preteen who struggles with low self-esteem, feelings of isolation and teasing because of her size. A group of 33 girls read a different book called Charlotte in Paris, which did not have an overweight heroine, and another group of 17 girls read neither book.

At the end of the six-month intervention, all the girls who read books had lost weight, but the girls who read Lake Rescue lost more. They lowered their body mass index (BMI), a ratio of weight and height used to measure obesity, by .71, compared with .33 in the Charlotte group an average .05 increase among the nonreaders.

:COP: