PDA

View Full Version : Jerry Lewis out as MDA chairman and off telethon



Pages : 1 2 3 [4] 5

heckles
08-12-2011, 06:27 AM
No one in the general populace gave a shit about the dangers of smoking back then, and if you did, you were considered to be a wack-job.

You're right, nobody knew about the dangers of smoking in 1976. The Surgeon General's warning on every pack, starting in 1966? A mere decoration. The anti-smoking lessons in schools in the 1960s and 1970s? Taught by a bunch of wack-jobs.

Here's a clue: considering that the other poster and I were discussing about how times have changed since that 1976 broadcast, I think we're all aware that times were different then.

Aceon6
08-12-2011, 01:16 PM
You're right, nobody knew about the dangers of smoking in 1976. The Surgeon General's warning on every pack, starting in 1966? A mere decoration. The anti-smoking lessons in schools in the 1960s and 1970s? Taught by a bunch of wack-jobs.

Was there. The anti smoking effort really didn't take off until the late 70s. I had ashtrays in my office until 1984. Heck, the high school I went to even had a designated student smoking area until 1977. As for any antismoking education, it was 30 seconds in health class - don't smoke, it's not attractive and you'll be smelly.

heckles
08-12-2011, 08:57 PM
Was there. The anti smoking effort really didn't take off until the late 70s.

The Public Health Cigarette Smoking Act was passed in 1970. The knowledge was there. No disagreement from me that there's a greater awareness now, but the other person is incorrect that nobody "gave a shit" back then.

attyfan
08-12-2011, 09:10 PM
The thing is - if you are being a spokesperson for an organization AND you are the star on the telethon, you MUST change your ways/jokes/prejudices. If you are not, then okkkkeydokey. but you must change if you are in the limelight.

While normally you are correct, I think this would be a false dichotomy for MDA and Lewis ... because they could just have him tape a message (perhaps, singing the song for the last time). Wouldn't this mean that Lewis really wouldn't be in the limelight, and it would have been a more gracious "send-off"?

heckles
08-12-2011, 10:38 PM
Added to the MDA website: (http://www.mda.org/telethon/)

The prime-time slot already is attracting new talent, such as country music superstars Darius Rucker, Lady Antebellum and Martina McBride.

No problems with any of those names, but is the "new talent" a subtle slam on Lewis? Don't know what they mean by "already" attracting either, since the telethon is only a few weeks away. None of those are really "new talent", unless perhaps they mean new to the telethon.

Latte
08-13-2011, 02:28 AM
You're right, nobody knew about the dangers of smoking in 1976. The Surgeon General's warning on every pack, starting in 1966? A mere decoration. The anti-smoking lessons in schools in the 1960s and 1970s? Taught by a bunch of wack-jobs.

Here's a clue: considering that the other poster and I were discussing about how times have changed since that 1976 broadcast, I think we're all aware that times were different then.

Are you sure about that? I was around in the 60's and 70's and no one knew the dangers of smoking and it certainly was not taught in school.
Try 1980's for that.
There weren't warnings on packs in the 60's or 70's either.

numbers123
08-13-2011, 04:03 AM
My dad quit smoking in the 60's when the surgeon general came out with the link between cigarettes/smoking and cancer. He quit cold turkey and pressured my mom to quit too.

MacMadame
08-13-2011, 04:29 AM
My dad quit smoking in the 60's when the surgeon general came out with the link between cigarettes/smoking and cancer. He quit cold turkey and pressured my mom to quit too.

That's great for him. He sounds really smart and forward thinking. But most people weren't taking those warnings very seriously back then. Smoking in public was everywhere and I have many memories of visiting relatives and coming home bathed in cigarette smoke because everyone smoked and thought nothing of doing it in front of the kids.

Definitely we weren't learning about the dangers of smoking in schools yet either. As someone else said, there was a smoking lounge at the HS for the kids who smoked!

Badams
08-13-2011, 05:30 AM
I can remember driving into Pennsylvania in the early 1990's to go shopping. In the mall, there were people walking around, smoking! It was shocking to me. It wasn't allowed in NY then. I think soon after, it was banked in PA also because the next time I was there, there was no smoking allowed.

my little pony
08-13-2011, 05:41 AM
in 1965 congress passed the 'cigarette labeling and advertising act' per this handy little thing called google. it said that every cigarette pack must have a warning label on its side stating "cigarettes may be hazardous to your health"

while many may have ignored it, it doesnt mean the information wasnt available

jenniferlyon
08-13-2011, 08:30 AM
Y
How come no one's looking for the good things he's done? I know people who've met Lewis through MDA and said that he's funny and genuinely kind. He told one kid how handsome he was in his suit. The kid beamed because he had had several surgeries for a birth defect. Make sure that well-timed remark is in the database.

He's raised millions of dollars for this charity, reached out to many in need, and contributed his own money and time to the effort. You're kind of kicking the guy while he's down by listing his every mistake, don't you think?

Jerry Lewis has worked his heart out for the MDA. In an age where celebrities adopt a different cause every year or so, Jerry Lewis stayed with the MDA for decades. I've been watching the telethon for as long as I can remember, and Jerry was always there. If he's too old/sick to host the telethon anymore, they should tape some segments and maybe bring him out in the end to sing "You'll Never Walk Alone."

Lizziebeth
08-13-2011, 08:34 AM
My dad quit smoking in the 60's when the surgeon general came out with the link between cigarettes/smoking and cancer. He quit cold turkey and pressured my mom to quit too.

Thats interesting that you say that. My dad was a long time heavy smoker and quit immediately when the surgeon general's report came out. He never started again and we were so proud of him. It was very difficult but he was motivated by that health report.

jenniferlyon
08-13-2011, 08:38 AM
Was there. The anti smoking effort really didn't take off until the late 70s. I had ashtrays in my office until 1984. Heck, the high school I went to even had a designated student smoking area until 1977. As for any antismoking education, it was 30 seconds in health class - don't smoke, it's not attractive and you'll be smelly.

That's pretty much how it was when I was in high school in the late 1980s. They finally did away with the designated smoking area a few years after I graduated. When I was a kid, almost every adult in my family and in the neighborhood smoked. The only exceptions were one of my aunts and the little old lady down the street.

Karina1974
08-13-2011, 01:27 PM
That's great for him. He sounds really smart and forward thinking. But most people weren't taking those warnings very seriously back then. Smoking in public was everywhere and I have many memories of visiting relatives and coming home bathed in cigarette smoke because everyone smoked and thought nothing of doing it in front of the kids.

Definitely we weren't learning about the dangers of smoking in schools yet either. As someone else said, there was a smoking lounge at the HS for the kids who smoked!

I vaguely remember my dad smoking, because he quit cold turkey when I was probably 3 or 4 years old. I remember the ask trays though, those ugly metal ones with the row of wire coils around the rims where you'd stick the cigarette. He told me he started back in the 1950's :because everybody else did it", and I was amazed when he told me he had been a 2-pack-a-day smoker, because he's not the "stressed out" type. he quit because with my older brothers getting into Scouting and him being the Assistant Scoutmaster for their troop, he wanted to be able to keep up with them. Also, he's heavily into all things science (being a now-retired mechanical engineer) so it would have been sheer stupidity for him to ignore whatever warnings were coming out at the end of the 1970's.

I wasn't in high school until the early 1990's, but I can remember the smoking lounge for the teachers in elementary school 30 years ago.

FigureSpins
08-13-2011, 02:30 PM
The Public Health Cigarette Smoking Act was passed in 1970. The knowledge was there. No disagreement from me that there's a greater awareness now, but the other person is incorrect that nobody "gave a shit" back then.
My dad only stopped smoking after his first heart attack in 1969/1970, but my mother never stopped. My family reunions used to have blue air - believe me, they literally "blew off" those warnings and campaigns right into the 1970's, even taking the time to mock the campaign. My mother-in-law smoked right up until her stroke, when my husband took away her cigarettes and she was too ill to go get more. It's an addiction, sadly enough.

On a lighter note, our local paper said the tobacco crops aren't doing well this year - they're half the size they should be at this time. While that's bad for the farmers and corporations, it could drive up prices and convince a few more people that the cost of smoking isn't worth the cost to health and wallet.