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View Full Version : Restaurant Bans Kids Under 6: Discrimination or Smart Move?



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Prancer
07-14-2011, 01:11 AM
I agree with you about language, but at the same time, I wouldn't go out of my way to say someone is being offensive. I'd just ignore them and mind my own business.

I wouldn't, either. If it really bugged me, I'd complain to the manager and let him or her be the bad guy. That's one of the things the managers get paid for.

But I've had strangers challenge me on my public behavior, and most of the time, they've been right and I was in the wrong. Damn them anyway. :P

hydro
07-14-2011, 01:15 AM
I wouldn't, either. If it really bugged me, I'd complain to the manager and let him or her be the bad guy. That's one of the things the managers get paid for.

But I've had strangers challenge me on my public behavior, and most of the time, they've been right and I was in the wrong. Damn them anyway. :P

Fair enough, but I don't think the original poster's response was unreasonable, either. If you're going to interrupt people for your own convenience, be prepared to get a rude response.

BigB08822
07-14-2011, 02:59 AM
Oh well, people are allowed to see both sides. I was there and we weren't being loud or cursing too much (IMO, of course). My point was that I shouldn't have to watch my mouth every time I speak because you decided to bring your children out late to a nice restaurant which is clearly catered to adults. Most people in this place hang out in the bar, if that says anything. I would never tell a family to quiet their kids if I was in Chuck E Cheese, if that helps anyone see my point of view.

Louis
07-14-2011, 03:40 AM
I agree that the example depends on context. If this is a place where "louder" parties are commonplace, then I think the family should yield. But if BigB0882 and friends were the loudest people in the restaurant by far, then maybe the family had a point.

If a religious conservative from the deep South takes her children to brunch in the Meatpacking and ends up sitting a few inches from Samantha and Carrie (or their male-on-male equivalents) who are discussing their sexcapades, IMO too bad for them. That conversation is not entirely out of place, and the kids are.

OTOH, if Samantha and Carrie go to a family diner in the deepwoods south and start screaming about the blowjobs they got last night, etc., then they deserve to be kicked out.

When in Rome.... and all of that.

Matryeshka
07-14-2011, 04:16 AM
No, you should watch your mouth because others probably aren't all that interested in you, regardless of whether they have children or not. Everyone focuses on what's being done to them/how they're being inconvenienced and not how others might see their actions. Your group (your is a general your and directed at no one specifically) is probably not nearly as funny/interesting/clever as y'all think you are, especially to people who don't know you and your friends/family. IME, people also don't have a good grasp on how loud they're actually being.

Conversations should be kept to your circle as much as possible, no matter where you are or how old you are. If I'm not going to excuse six year olds for being obnoxious, I'm sure as hell not going to excuse 26 year olds. Either you can behave in public, or you can't. It costs you nothing to be mindful of your choice of language or speak more softly. If you can't think of any other words besides the four letter ones, there are plenty of free online dictionaries to help you.

allezfred
07-14-2011, 12:28 PM
On the other hand, sometimes the conversations you hear because people are speaking too loudly can be fascinating. :watch:

IceAlisa
07-27-2011, 04:38 AM
Here's an update: http://shine.yahoo.com/channel/parenting/the-no-kids-allowed-movement-is-spreading-2516110/