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nubka
07-12-2011, 09:04 PM
If I can afford it when the time comes, I would consider doing this. Why not look great for the viewing? :cool:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2013848/Dead-beautiful-Beauty-brand-Illamasqua-offers-makeovers-glam-afterlife.html

Peaches LaTour
07-12-2011, 09:22 PM
Cremation is the name of the final game for me but this thread is interesting.

We recently toured a local masoleum and our group got a "lecture" about the importance of having a good embalmer.

The cemetary employee told us a story about a middle-aged woman and a 6 year old boy both of whom had been deceased since 1936 and whose families recently chose to move them elsewhere.

When their coffins were opened the child (who apparently had a wonderful embalmer) looked like he was recently deceased. The woman, on the other hand, was not so lucky and looked really bad - was not even wearing a bra which the officials could detect immediately due to obvious "separation".

Apparently neither age at time of death nor cause of death had any effect upon the preservation of either individual.

"You get what you pay for" was the echoing motto as we left the premises. ;)

moojja
07-12-2011, 09:35 PM
Cremation is the name of the final game for me but this thread is interesting.

We recently toured a local masoleum and our group got a "lecture" about the importance of having a good embalmer.

The cemetary employee told us a story about a middle-aged woman and a 6 year old boy both of whom had been deceased since 1936 and whose families recently chose to move them elsewhere.

When their coffins were opened the child (who apparently had a wonderful embalmer) looked like he was recently deceased. The woman, on the other hand, was not so lucky and looked really bad - was not even wearing a bra which the officials could detect immediately due to obvious "separation".

Apparently neither age at time of death nor cause of death had any effect upon the preservation of either individual.

"You get what you pay for" was the echoing motto as we left the premises. ;)

No offense, but how long have they've been dead? Maybe the boy was secretly a saint or a vampire. :)

Frankly the boy freaks me out a bit, I mean a corpus is a corpus, it shouldn't look good. I have read that we're so full of preservatives from the food we ingest, that our bodies don't even rot properly anymore. But I didn't read it a science journal, so the reporter could have been exaggerating..

vesperholly
07-12-2011, 10:33 PM
We recently toured a local masoleum and our group got a "lecture" about the importance of having a good embalmer.

The cemetary employee told us a story about a middle-aged woman and a 6 year old boy both of whom had been deceased since 1936 and whose families recently chose to move them elsewhere.

When their coffins were opened the child (who apparently had a wonderful embalmer) looked like he was recently deceased. The woman, on the other hand, was not so lucky and looked really bad - was not even wearing a bra which the officials could detect immediately due to obvious "separation".

... but it begs the question WHY would someone want to "look good" decades after death? Is someone going to dig me up 70 years later to see what I look like?! :eek: Even if they move me, please don't open the coffin! :scream:

nubka
07-13-2011, 01:24 AM
... but it begs the question WHY would someone want to "look good" decades after death? Is someone going to dig me up 70 years later to see what I look like?! :eek: Even if they move me, please don't open the coffin! :scream:

I just want to look fabulous when (or if) people come to see me at the viewing. After I'm in the ground, the game is really over! :D

barbk
07-13-2011, 01:27 AM
Anybody who wants to open a coffin just to take a look long after it was buried is a little bonkers, imo. Make that a lot bonkers.

I'm not even a fan of open caskets at viewings, but the thought of opening it for a reburial is just nasty.

Gazpacho
07-13-2011, 02:40 AM
I just want to look fabulous when (or if) people come to see me at the viewing. After I'm in the ground, the game is really over! :DYes! I want their final impression to be, "Wow, she was so beautiful", considering that disease and accidents render most people not beautiful upon death.

But once I'm in the ground, leave me there!

milanessa
07-13-2011, 03:20 AM
I want to be dumped in a hole in the backyard when I go. No embalming, no marker just a little bare spot in the ground until the grass grows back. My husband is resisting but I shall prevail. :)

Cyn
07-13-2011, 04:59 AM
... but it begs the question WHY would someone want to "look good" decades after death?

I guess it's important if you're going to be on Law & Order (or any of the spin-offs) :P .

For some people, I suppose, it's that ego thing that wants those who see them for the last time to be able to day, "but damn, didn't she look good." Case in point, my maternal grandmother, who died in 1996.

When it came to those final preparations, I couldn't believe all the planning and insanity that went into the viewing, funeral, and burial. Besides selecting a casket, there were also the issues of the flowers, the program, the music selections, picking out a guest book, the prayers, and all that other external crap. My mother is the type of person who agonizes for 3 hours in a store when buying socks, so trying to make these kinds of decisions on short notice and while grieving pushed every button that woman has.

As for my grandmama, my mother and Aunt went into an (of course emotional; their mother had just died) unbelievable snit about trying to select "the outfit" and jewelry - my grandmama was a total fashion plate up until the day she died and loved to ballroom dance (and ride motorcycles :rofl: ), so they wanted to find something that summed her personality up. When the immediate family arrived at the funeral home before the viewing, my mom, Aunt, and Great-Aunt about had an apoplectic fit when they saw how the embalmers/morticians had, despite being given photos, fixed her hair and makeup, as well as how the dress and jewelry was arranged and how the body was positioned.

In spite of the grief of losing my grandmama (of her grandchildren, I was by far the closest one to her, plus my body was overrun with pregnancy hormones), this mistake did help break the tension for a short bit. First there was the frantic search through various purses to find someone with a shade of lipstick my grandmother would have liked. They also got hold of a brush and completely re-did her hair (well, wig - she was almost bald by then from the chemo), then re-arranged her dress and necklace, and finally moved her body into something they liked better and put her evening purse in her hands rather than just resting on her chest.

I will never forget the sight of my itty-bitty (4'11" tall and almost that length around) Great-Aunt standing guard at the doorway to the room like she was Secret Service guarding the President while my mother and Aunt all but climbed into the casket to correct the mortician's mistakes, doing that whispered yelling at one another the whole time. Between watching this unfold, punctuated with hearing things like "NO, don't do that, she'll look like a streetwalker!" "Don't be stupid, you know she was proud of her cleavage," "Oh shit, now she looks like she's just drunk," "Dammit Carolyn, you smeared lipstick all over her face!" and the like, there's at least one moment of that sad day that I can look back on and smile in memory, because god knows, I was a sobbing, blubbering, mess the rest of the time.

As for me, although I'm not religious at all, I technically am Jewish, and therefore I will not be cremated, but I don't know if I want a Jewish burial. When my father died, he followed the traditional religious protocol - no embalming, simple white burial dressing, no viewing (there are no viewings or services in the synagogues), simple wooden casket, and the graveside service (plus the sitting Shivah at the house for a week). Personally, I don't think I'd want anyone gawking at my corpse, plus even though I would leave very specific instructions as to what I would want to be buried in, I doubt my oh-so-proper Southern family would abide by those wishes, especially if by some twist of fate I were to go before my mother. If I have my way about it, I would have a closed-casket graveside service, selections of writings/poetry that I have chosen in place of prayers, and a selections of tunes to be played (again, of my choosing). It's times like this I really dig the Irish, as I think the concept of a wake makes a lot more sense than a bunch of people sitting around sniffling. People, celebrate and laugh about my silly, crazy life - don't mourn about my passing, FFS.

Civic
07-13-2011, 05:37 AM
Oh my! The things some people worry about. Keeping up appearances after you're dead? Why bother?

walei
07-13-2011, 06:55 AM
Don't want to sound like a hippie but I love the idea of returning to Mother Earth and complete the circle of life. I once entertained the idea to my mother the concept of Tibetan "sky burial" where we let the body decompose on a mountaintop and let the birds/vulture eat it. My mother, although extremely religious in Buddhism was horrified at the idea :lol:

So I will just settle being cremated but do not keep my ashes in one place... The ocean, the parks, the mountain, the wilderness... spread me around!!!

Also, when I want to participate in a viewing of a deceased, it's more of being intrigued in looking at a dead body. Sounds morbid I know... but I normally don't feel like looking at a dead family member. It's not the last image I want to remember them by...

missflick
07-13-2011, 07:10 AM
I, for one, couldn't give a damn what I look like when I die. Just like "you can't bring it with you"....

nubka
07-13-2011, 04:43 PM
Oh my! The things some people worry about. Keeping up appearances after you're dead? Why bother?

It's doesn't matter forever - just for the big send off, lol! :lol: :lol:

barbk
07-13-2011, 04:56 PM
Don't want to sound like a hippie but I love the idea of returning to Mother Earth and complete the circle of life. I once entertained the idea to my mother the concept of Tibetan "sky burial" where we let the body decompose on a mountaintop and let the birds/vulture eat it. My mother, although extremely religious in Buddhism was horrified at the idea :lol:
.

There is a cool monastery in Georgia where you can be buried naturally, amongst the trees and bushes, as long as you haven't been embalmed and your casket is fully compostable, and no vaults. I thought that was a whole lot less creepy than Forest Lawn, and I hope options like this spread.

http://www.honeycreekwoodlands.com/

milanessa
07-13-2011, 05:16 PM
There are green cemeteries in the US and the number is growing.

http://www.naturalburial.coop/find-a-green-cemetery/