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nubka
07-12-2011, 09:01 PM
I don't think it should be called a library. Come up with another name for it, haha

ITA! Call it something, but not a library...

GarrAarghHrumph
07-12-2011, 09:43 PM
But it *is* a library. Library doesn't mean "books", we've just come to associate it with hardcopy books. It indicates manuscripts - and what form a manuscript has taken over history has changed, and is still changing.

moojja
07-12-2011, 09:43 PM
...I see its uses for travel and not wanting to lug around a lot of books, but even for college students, it is actually much more work, in my opinion, to take separate notes where you could just highlight your textbooks and make notes in the margins.

I could never write on a book for any reason. I always have to take separate notes. But for research, where I have to cross reference multiple books, it's easier w/ physical books. At least until e-readers gets really inexpensive, or I become really rich.

Prancer
07-12-2011, 10:11 PM
I couldn't agree more about vinyl and the fact that not all technology is inherently better. Vinyl is making a comeback as I see many more records being sold at music stores these days than I did in the late 90's/early 2000's when digital was the newest hot thing on the market.

I keep reading this, and that vinyl sales are going up while CD sales are dropping. Well, yeah. Vinyl sales have improved. Two point eight million vinyl records sold last year in the US. Meanwhile, in the same year, 1.2 billion ILLEGAL downloads were made. That doesn't even include legitimate sales. Of course CDs are losing ground; no one needs them to get digital tracks any more.

So I don't think vinyl is really making a comeback. And I think print books will be like vinyl eventually--boutique items for people who consider themselves connoisseurs and for specialty items.


Those who engender evil glee have usally spent the quarter stubbornly submitting minimal work while demanding stellar grades.

It is hard to suppress that cackle sometimes.


I could never write on a book for any reason. I always have to take separate notes.

Me, too. But it is very easy to highlight and add notes in electronic media.

I would not, however, recommend an e-reader for this purpose. E-readers are great for pleasure reading, but they are not great for research at all.


But for research, where I have to cross reference multiple books, it's easier w/ physical books.

Yes, this is a common problem with electronic books. That's why most people print their articles out rather than just looking at them online. For me, however, I'd rather use Diigo (http://www.diigo.com) to highlight and add notes; cross referencing is then a breeze. I also like online textbooks; I like the search feature and the automatic outline. I can't convince my students that it's actually easier to use once they learn how, but it is inevitable that they will.

skateycat
07-12-2011, 10:33 PM
I am in the middle of earning a master's degree in library and information science.

I also produce a somewhat obscure reference resource, a dictionary of the Karuk language. Online and print editions are available. People love the physical book, and there is a lot of front and back matter that hasn't yet been put on the website, but the last edition was published in 2005.

The online version is the dictionary is more accurate, as I put up an updated version of the database just a few months ago.

I can update the database so easily, whereas the second edition of the book is going to take a lot of work. Also, the online version gives me the ability to add audio, which our users have been clamoring for since day one.

I don't see physical books going 100% by the wayside, as even vinyl records have made a niche comeback in the music world.

My father-in-law, who passed this April, owned and managed a number of off-campus textbook stores, and he wasn't happy about the e-book revolution. He knew he wouldn't be able to adapt to the change.

nubka
07-13-2011, 01:22 AM
But it *is* a library. Library doesn't mean "books", we've just come to associate it with hardcopy books. It indicates manuscripts - and what form a manuscript has taken over history has changed, and is still changing.

True - but I can't wrap my mind around it, or maybe I just don't want to... :(