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View Full Version : Actress Greta Scacchi's Shocking Revelation: My Cousin Fathered My Son



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Rex
07-11-2011, 06:53 PM
Common perhaps, but still icky. I mean, their parents are siblings! There are too many people in the world to date than someone who has the same grandparents as you.

Good point.

Andrushka
07-11-2011, 06:59 PM
I have a rule that if I share a common ancestor with someone within the last 4-5 generatons,it just isn't happening lol If someone else wants to,it's their business but it is something that doesn't interest me.

orientalplane
07-11-2011, 07:03 PM
There are too many people in the world to date than someone who has the same grandparents as you.

What if cousins simply fall in love?

Rex
07-11-2011, 07:12 PM
IIRC, Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were fifth cousins....were they not?
When does it affect genetics? How close do you have to be related before the risk of defects increase?

duane
07-11-2011, 07:14 PM
What if cousins simply fall in love?
I guess it depends on when simply falling in love is enough. Is it ok if we're talking brother and sister? Uncle and niece? Father and daughter? Your son and your brother's daughter? IMO, icky all around.

Buzz
07-11-2011, 07:34 PM
My cousins are more like brothers than my own brothers sometimes. It is just rrreally hard for me to imagine. :scream:

Satellitegirl
07-11-2011, 07:37 PM
IIRC, incest doesn't necessarily mean anything as far as genetic problems or illness goes. I read a study that debunked that a while back. It's still sort of creepy just due to social norms, but yeah, overall sort of eh.

I mean next thing you know, gays will be marrying or something :rofl:

milanessa
07-11-2011, 07:49 PM
I don't have a male first cousin worth looking at twice. :slinkaway

Wiery
07-11-2011, 08:03 PM
IIRC, Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were fifth cousins....were they not?
When does it affect genetics? How close do you have to be related before the risk of defects increase?


IIRC, Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were fifth cousins....were they not?
When does it affect genetics? How close do you have to be related before the risk of defects increase?

Okay, I'm not an expert at this, but in one generation, I believe the risks aren't large. However, when this happens over multiple generations, then the risks get larger. That's why some "small" populations have tendencies toward certain diseases or disorders...For example, Ohio Amish have a genetic tendency towards "Cohens syndrome," certain middle eastern tribes which intermarry have higher rates of certain genetic disorders than the general population, etc...

I usually like to quote scientific sources, but this 60 Minutes article gives a very good explanation of Cohen's syndrome in the Ohio Amish:

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2005/06/08/60II/main700519.shtml

Here's one related to co-sanguinity and genetic disorders in Jordan: http://ncd.org.jo/index2.php?option=com_docman&task=doc_view&gid=132&Itemid=79

Amy L
07-11-2011, 08:03 PM
I don't have a male first cousin worth looking at twice. :slinkaway

One of my first cousins is very close to my brother in terms of both age and looks. So... never ever ever....:slinkaway The other male first cousin I have is around 20 years old, I have not seen him since he was 8. I do not know where he lives or what he looks like now, so if I'm ever in a cougar phase I need to be careful of ever picking up any guy named Austin without looking at his birth certificate. :rollin:

Rex
07-11-2011, 08:20 PM
Okay, I'm not an expert at this, but in one generation, I believe the risks aren't large. However, when this happens over multiple generations, then the risks get larger. That's why some "small" populations have tendencies toward certain diseases or disorders...For example, Ohio Amish have a genetic tendency towards "Cohens syndrome," certain middle eastern tribes which intermarry have higher rates of certain genetic disorders than the general population, etc...

I usually like to quote scientific sources, but this 60 Minutes article gives a very good explanation of Cohen's syndrome in the Ohio Amish:

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2005/06/08/60II/main700519.shtml

Here's one related to co-sanguinity and genetic disorders in Jordan: http://ncd.org.jo/index2.php?option=com_docman&task=doc_view&gid=132&Itemid=79


From the Amish story:
"I have a son that married a girl, they share the same great-great grandfather," says Iva Byler. "And when he called me to tell me that he was gonna get married, I said, 'Do you realize that you already stand a big chance to have a handicapped child since you have three siblings.' And he says, 'Yes, I know.' He got married anyway."
Can't argue with that kind of logic. They sound so willing to accept the risk.

Moto Guzzi
07-11-2011, 08:23 PM
I have two first cousins who have been married to each other for about 35 years (their mothers and my mother are sisters). They have three children who are all fine. Their mothers were very upset when they eloped but got over it. We still make jokes about them being their own cousins by marriage. That, and other things, too (those two cousins always were a bit strange). :shuffle:

DarrellH
07-11-2011, 08:41 PM
It may be another of those instances where the celebrity makes the revelation (comes out, etc.) because the "reporter" has come to them saying that an article is being written on this. Do they have any statements that can be added? Chad Allen had this happen. He was told he was about to be outed by a tabloid, that had proof. Did he want to be interviewed to do this nicely, or should the tabloid put their spin on the whole thing.

dinakt
07-11-2011, 09:22 PM
I don't get the ick factor. I get that if can complicate a child's genetical make-up, especially if repeated through generations, but do not emotionally feel that first cousins are automatically taboo. Who do you think people in small villages married 500 years ago? I think it depends much more on circumstances of upbringing- if you played your whole life with a first cousin, he/she will probably feel more like a brother/ sister; if you saw each other first at 18, it might feel differently.

Jenya
07-11-2011, 09:29 PM
I don't get the ick factor. I get that if can complicate a child's genetical make-up, especially if repeated through generations, but do not emotionally feel that first cousins are automatically taboo. Who do you think people in small villages married 500 years ago? I think it depends much more on circumstances of upbringing- if you played your whole life with a first cousin, he/she will probably feel more like a brother/ sister; if you saw each other first at 18, it might feel differently.

My mom's younger sister married their first cousin, who they did grow up with and were very close to as children. :yikes: They've been married for 30 years and have two children and grandchildren, so I guess it worked out for them, but it was pretty awkward when I figured out as a 5 year-old that they were related and their own children didn't even know. :lol: