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nubka
07-12-2011, 06:13 PM
On another forum there was a story recently about airlines that are adopting a "no children" policy for business and first class. The discussion...lively to say the least. I can only imagine how the idea of flying with Octomom and her funny car kids would impact that debate. :lol:

I'd love to read that forum. Link? :)

Beefcake
07-12-2011, 07:37 PM
I'd rather have 8 two year-olds doing their thing on my flight than 1 eager person sitting next to me with intents on becoming my BFFABFIMFTDOTF (Best Friends Forever And By Forever I Mean For The Duration Of The Flight). :scream:

Oh, :drama: the deep, personal, emotional, life-affirming conversations I've heard from complete strangers cum best friends cum complete strangers once again. I curse those earphone-free minutes on take-off and landing when I'm forbidden from listening to my iPod! :yikes:

jamesy
07-12-2011, 07:39 PM
Just recline your seat and start a fight with the person behind you if you don't want to talk to your neighbor. :saint:

my little pony
07-12-2011, 07:51 PM
if you wear your sunglasses, it is like a Do Not Disturb sign on your face

UMBS Go Blue
07-12-2011, 10:08 PM
mlp, we have so got to elope and have kids. they're going to be awfully smart, properly socialized, well-adjusted, and, above all, well-behaved on planes. :encore: :cheer2: :40beers:

my little pony
07-12-2011, 10:12 PM
mlp, we have so got to elope and have kids. they're going to be awfully smart, properly socialized, well-adjusted, and, above all, well-behaved on planes. :encore: :cheer2: :40beers:

their junior subscriptions to the economist will put them out like a light

PrincessLeppard
07-12-2011, 10:18 PM
mlp, we have so got to elope and have kids. they're going to be awfully smart, properly socialized, well-adjusted, and, above all, well-behaved on planes. :encore: :cheer2: :40beers:

Yeah, my very bright, awesome cousin thought that about her kid as well. Kid is a freaking nightmare. :scream:

UMBS Go Blue
07-12-2011, 10:22 PM
their junior subscriptions to the economist will put them out like a light
EYS! :cheer2: No need for nyquil!

But just think - with all the frequent flier miles I still have, we could take the kids to the Olympics in Rio in 2016. In business class. They will be such perfect children. :glamor:


Yeah, my very bright, awesome cousin thought that about her kid as well. Kid is a freaking nightmare. :scream:Not our kids.

manleywoman
07-12-2011, 10:24 PM
Can I be your kid?

UMBS Go Blue
07-12-2011, 10:26 PM
Can I be your kid?Perhaps, but we wouldn't let you fly until we'd be positive you'd behave. :shuffle:

rfisher
07-12-2011, 10:30 PM
I promise. And, I've already moved out.

UMBS Go Blue
07-12-2011, 10:34 PM
And, as one of many coping tactics, we'd take out The Economist.

"Say, rfisher, I've got this EXCITING (http://www.economist.com/node/18712379) story for you. Repeat after me!"


IN 1983 Jornal do Brasil, a newspaper in Rio de Janeiro, sent a reporter to Brazil’s north-east to cover a drought. He found starving residents eating rats and lizards. Since then, the country has made strides. Yet the north-east remains Brazil’s poorest region: it has 28% of the country’s people but just 14% of its GDP. A fifth of the area’s adults are illiterate, twice the national rate. And it holds more than half the 16m Brazilians who live on less than 70 reais ($43) a month. For decades it has exported workers to the kitchens and construction sites of the rich cities in the south-east.

Recently, however, the north-east has become Brazil’s star economic performer. In the past decade the region’s GDP rose by 4.2% a year, compared with 3.6% for the country as a whole. Last year Pernambuco state’s economy grew by a China-like 9.3%.

:saint:

Prancer
07-12-2011, 10:34 PM
Secondarily, things like reading, homework, personally owned entertainment devices, and airline-issued personal entertaiment devices keep kids going.

:lol: Sorry, but I'd LOVE to see you deal with eight two-year-olds by having them do their homework. And keep them from destroying the airline-issued entertainment devices you hand them to keep them quiet. Those personally owned entertainment devices make great weapons and books are terrific devices for clobbering siblings, too.

I have no argument whatsoever that this woman's kids are out of control and shouldn't be. I wouldn't want to be on a plane with them, either. But having such expectations for your average two-year-old is unrealistic.

A two-year-old IS at the very earliest age possible for learning how to behave in public, which means that a two-year-old still has a long way to go; two-year-olds aren't particularly aware that other people exist and certainly don't consider them important. They have to be taught, which means that they are, at that age, still in the early stages of learning.

A screaming, obnoxious two-year-old is not necessarily the product of bad parenting and isn't doomed to savagery for life. :lol: Nor is that quiet, well-behaved two-year-old over there necessarily that way because of fabulous parenting and destined to go on to a civilized life.

I consider drugging kids to be an avoidance of parenting, not an example of good parenting. YMMV, obviously.


riff raff can be so tiresome. :drama:

:lol:


I'd rather have 8 two year-olds doing their thing on my flight than 1 eager person sitting next to me with intents on becoming my BFFABFIMFTDOTF (Best Friends Forever And By Forever I Mean For The Duration Of The Flight). :scream:

Oh, :drama: the deep, personal, emotional, life-affirming conversations I've heard from complete strangers cum best friends cum complete strangers once again. I curse those earphone-free minutes on take-off and landing when I'm forbidden from listening to my iPod! :yikes:

Hey, now, I let you go the bathroom in peace. What more do you want from me? :drama:

UMBS Go Blue
07-12-2011, 10:42 PM
:lol: Sorry, but I'd LOVE to see you deal with eight two-year-olds by having them do their homework. With all due respect, I wouldn't have eight kids just for the TV show novelty of it. And if I did have eight kids, I'd do so only if I was fully prepared to deal with all the consequences. Moreover, out of respect for others, I'd avoid taking them flying until they were old and behaved enough to do so.

Prancer
07-12-2011, 10:44 PM
With all due respect, I wouldn't have eight kids just for the TV show novelty of it.

With all due respect, neither would I, nor would anyone sane, IMO.

But whatever we would or would not do, that was the actual situation, was it not? What should she do about it now? Put some of them back?