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Artemis@BC
09-06-2011, 10:55 PM
I am off to find myself a copy of World Without End. :D

I nick-named this Book Without End, if that gives you any indication of how I felt about it ...


Detective novels with lesbian detective ...

Just stay away from the Lindsay Duncan series by Val McDermid. Although I love McDermid's Hill/Jordan series, as well as her non-series mysteries, I found the Lindsay Duncan series to be almost unreadable. Odd, that, since the author is a lesbian herself, you'd think she'd write a good lesbian protagonist, but no.

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And meanwhile I have no reading time these days because I'm spending all my time preparing for the plumbers to come in. Among other things, I have to move a 12 foot by 5 foot book shelf that is 2 layers deep of books about 4 feet away from the living room wall so they can access the kitchen pipes. Definitely makes ebooks look very attractive in that respect!

Prancer
09-07-2011, 01:21 AM
I'm thinking I might be interesting in reading Tragedy in South Lebanon.

You should read The Ghosts of Martyrs Square: An Eyewitness Account of Lebanon's Life Struggle (http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Ghosts-of-Martyrs-Square/Michael-Young/e/9781439109458/), too.


Re: the class on the subject in the Middle East. I hope you're ready for the papers that class might generate. I was teaching Freshman comp when 9/11 happened and I had to ban papers that had anything to do with the middle east.

I was teaching freshman comp when 9/11 happened, too--on a military base. Half of my class was deployed between the first and third classes. Most of them were teenagers right out of basic. And because my class was held in the a building that also housed a security division, we all had to be patted down and searched on entry and had a guard armed with an AR-15 in the hallway to keep us from attempting to break through the three secured doors between us and them during class breaks. Good times, good times. But I didn't get a single paper about the Middle East, then or (with one exception) since. I'm still on the base. The military students don't want to write about the Middle East and the civilians learn to shut up because a lot of the military students have been there and done that, and they tend to :rolleyes: at the civvies and their opinions.

I actually got the idea for the class from a student paper that was :scream:. I am not afraid of the papers so much as I am having to deal with class discussion; I am sure that I will get some millennialists in class :shuffle: and that means I am also sure to get some complaints. But I figure the military students will have interesting things to contribute and it's certainly a subject upon which most American students could do with some study.

Jenya
09-07-2011, 01:30 AM
I'm reading Tragedy in South Lebanon: The Israeli-Hezbollah War Of 2006 (http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Tragedy-in-South-Lebanon/Cathy-Sultan/e/9780979824982/). It is, as you would expect, depressing :(. The Lemon Tree: An Arab, a Jew, and the Heart of the Middle East (http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/lemon-tree-sandy-tolan/1006702535?ean=9781596919228&itm=1&usri=the%2blemon%2btree%2ban%2barab%2ba%2bjew%2ban d%2bthe%2bheart) is next, and I hope it is more uplifting.

I'm thinking of doing a class next year with a focus on conflict in the Middle East. I may think again :shuffle:.

One of the best classes I took in undergrad was an upper division political science class dealing with the Israeli/Palestinian conflict. In a 10-week long term, we read 10 books - 70 pages a night, 7 nights a week. It was a lot of work but totally worth it. The entire class was discussion-based. Before class started, everyone wrote questions and discussion topics on the blackboard. We started each class with a quick quiz, based on the reading - if you'd done the reading, they were easy. Aside from that, we spent the rest of the class talking about the readings. Our grades were based on our quiz scores and participation.

The class sounded intimidating at the start, and a lot of students didn't make it past the first few weeks, but all of the time and energy was completely worthwhile. I learned more from that class than any other in my four years of undergrad, and I really enjoyed all of the readings. My professor was great at presenting the material in a fairly unbiased way, which is difficult to do given the topic - he chose 5 pro-Israeli books, 5 pro-Palestinian books, and then took surveys at the beginning and the end of the course to see how peoples' opinions had changed.

It's been a couple of years since I took the class, but I'd be happy to send you the list of books we read. I'm pretty sure my professor keeps an updated list of books he's used in the past and currently uses for his courses, as well, in case he's changed the syllabus. I'll have to look into the book about South Lebanon, sounds very interesting.

Prancer
09-07-2011, 01:51 AM
It's been a couple of years since I took the class, but I'd be happy to send you the list of books we read.

Thank you; I'd really appreciate that. I'm not sure yet what the focus is going to be, but I have a year of reading to do.


I'll have to look into the book about South Lebanon, sounds very interesting.

I got interested in reading about Lebanon because of a Lebanese student who is rather passionately political; I realized while talking to him that I really don't know much about Lebanon and need to catch up.

zaphyre14
09-07-2011, 01:09 PM
I know where Lebanon is on a map. :) That's about the extent of my knowledge, other than the fact that most of the country is Catholic and there are more trees than just Cedars in Lebanon - which I learned from the gas station owner in town who used to chat while he pumped gas and cleaned windshields. He was quite proud of his heritage and very passionate about it as well. I was sad when he converted the station to self-serve.

I finished the Balogh book during a severe bout of insomnia last night - the characters got more interesting in the second half and made me remember why I like Balogh in the first place. I then started Jeaniene Frost's "One Grave at a Time" the sixth in her Night Huntress paranormal mystery series. I had a bit of trouble getting into it because I'd forgotten what happened in Book 5 and this one starts about 15 minutes after that one ends. But pieces are coming back to me and I think I'll like this one once I'm awake.

Matryeshka
09-07-2011, 06:40 PM
I finished The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake.. While I'm glad I read it and I appreciate it as a well-written piece of literature, I don't think I need to read anything by Aimee Bender ever again.

I'm not sure what I'm supposed to take away from the book. I'm not sure I liked any of the characters. It's kind of like Johnny Weir's programs last year-you see the potential and there's some nice window dressing here and there so you keep watching, but somehow, the mood that's being set never materializes, and then it ends like a fragmented sentence.

Am now reading The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao.. I started it a long time ago but never finished. All these real books are killing me...but my Kindle DIED and the replacement won't be here till Friday :wuzrobbed. It died just when Victoria was meeting Henry Fitzroy (royal. bastard. vampire) after she was nearly attacked by the bad vampire!! And you know the local bookstore has no Tanya Huff? I NEED VAMPIRES. :drama:

Allen
09-07-2011, 06:43 PM
I finished The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake.. While I'm glad I read it and I appreciate it as a well-written piece of literature, I don't think I need to read anything by Aimee Bender ever again.


Am now reading The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao.. I started it a long time ago but never finished. All these real books are killing me...but my Kindle DIED and the replacement won't be here till Friday :wuzrobbed. It died just when Victoria was meeting Henry Fitzroy (royal. bastard. vampire) after she was nearly attacked by the bad vampire!! And you know the local bookstore has no Tanya Huff? I NEED VAMPIRES. :drama:

I think Bender's short stories are worth reading. In a lot of ways, I like them more than her novels.

BWLOOW is really good. Again with Diaz, though, I like his short story collection Drown more than I liked the full novel.

Tanya Huff...is this someone I need to check out?

Prancer
09-07-2011, 07:41 PM
I don't think I need to read anything by Aimee Bender ever again.

I don't see myself reading anything of hers again, either. If I'm going to have to overlook things and work at reading a book, I want a big payoff in return.


my Kindle DIED and the replacement won't be here till Friday :wuzrobbed.

Be strong, ((((Matry)))). My Nook is still cruising along, all the better for the latest upgrade, but I checked out two really trashy library books Saturday and when I tried to sideload them, I got nothing but error messages. B&N is sending me a new USB cable, but those books are already checked out and the days are ticking away. I need a trash fix to offset tragedy.

Allen
09-07-2011, 08:55 PM
Kindle is currently running a promotion for 1 dollar biography and memoirs. There were some good choices. I ended up getting Anthony Bourdain's Typhoid Mary.

It was at the bottom of the home page on my Kindle. They email you a code after you click on the link on the bottom.

rfisher
09-07-2011, 09:26 PM
All these real books are killing me...but my Kindle DIED and the replacement won't be here till Friday :wuzrobbed. It died just when Victoria was meeting Henry Fitzroy (royal. bastard. vampire) after she was nearly attacked by the bad vampire!! And you know the local bookstore has no Tanya Huff? I NEED VAMPIRES. :drama:





Be strong, ((((Matry)))). My Nook is still cruising along, all the better for the latest upgrade, but I checked out two really trashy library books Saturday and when I tried to sideload them, I got nothing but error messages. B&N is sending me a new USB cable, but those books are already checked out and the days are ticking away. I need a trash fix to offset tragedy.

Well, well. So all is not sunny in ereader land. How about that.

Prancer
09-07-2011, 09:45 PM
Well, well. So all is not sunny in ereader land. How about that.

How's things going with that Borders closing? Still no other bookstores in the area?

Oh, look, I just downloaded another book.

IceAlisa
09-07-2011, 09:45 PM
Well, well. So all is not sunny in ereader land. How about that.

Do you think Voldeprancer's horcrux is her Nook? I wonder which hapless English student she murdered to create it...:saint:

Grannyfan
09-07-2011, 10:06 PM
I am reading Before I Go to Sleep. About two-thirds through it and still waiting for the suspense.

gkelly
09-07-2011, 10:25 PM
That is the suspense -- will there be any, or not? Keeps you wondering.

PrincessLeppard
09-07-2011, 10:59 PM
Oh, look, I just downloaded another book.

(((Prancer's credit card)))