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my little pony
09-05-2011, 03:17 AM
[SIZE="1"]I may or may not have bought over 50 books from Borders since the going out of business sale. :shuffle:

amateur

rfisher
09-05-2011, 12:38 PM
amateur

:lol: I bow down, my Queen. Although, our store will be open at least a couple more weeks. I'm branching out to other areas of the store now.

Erin
09-06-2011, 03:46 AM
So I may have to stop reading Unbroken. It's an excellent book, but about halfway through the book, the subject matter is getting rather gruesome and I suspect it's about to get worse. (I'm now at the part where Louie and Phil are in the jail cells on Execution Island) At a minimum, I'm not reading it before bed anymore because it gave me nightmares a couple of days ago.

I really want to go back to reading I Capture the Castle for something lighter, but Kobo's help desk has been next to useless. They keep telling me I should search out the book and then click on "Save For Later" which should get me the book, but no matter how many times I tell them that this option does not exist (complete with screen prints), they still seem to keep suggesting the same thing. :wall:

Spinner
09-06-2011, 04:19 AM
I picked up a copy of Elizabeth Goudge's The Child From the Sea (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/205619.The_Child_from_the_Sea) at a secondhand shop today (really good original 1970 edition too). Anyone ever read her? Thoughts?

Nomad
09-06-2011, 04:40 AM
Is that the one about Charles II's alleged first wife, Lucy Walters? If so, it was a decent historical novel.

Spinner
09-06-2011, 05:01 AM
Is that the one about Charles II's alleged first wife, Lucy Walters? If so, it was a decent historical novel.

Yup, thanks :)

flyingsit
09-06-2011, 01:14 PM
Hey PL, I read World War Z over the weekend... good one!

zaphyre14
09-06-2011, 02:19 PM
I just finished Kalayna Price's "Grave Witch." Typical paranormal plot: woman with extraordinary power to speak to shades of the dead stumbles into murder plot and is torn between two phenomal men: a fey detective and Death Personified. But the alternate world the author has created made this a bit different and I have to say I liked it better than Hamilton's Anita Blake and as much as Butchers Dresden Files. I just hope that Price stays focussed on the mystery angle in the next book and leaves the torn-between-to-lovers competition in the background.

As the Publicly Confessed Resident Dreck-Reader here, I will now admit to reading Mary Balogh's "A Secret Affair" now. I like Balogh but I could see the entire plot of this one in the first five pages and I'm not even finding the two main characters all that interesting or unique, which is unusual for Balogh.

rfisher
09-06-2011, 02:28 PM
:40beers: For dreck!

PrincessLeppard
09-06-2011, 05:43 PM
Hey PL, I read World War Z over the weekend... good one!

:cheer2: I know they're going to ruin it with the movie, so I encourage everyone to read the book.

Speaking of dreck :P, I'm reading the Bourne Identity. I love spy stories (I miss the Cold War *sniff* ;) ), but I'm finding this one hard to slog through.

Matryeshka
09-06-2011, 06:04 PM
The Bourne Identity is one of the few series where the movies were a vast improvement over the books.

I started The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake, and before I realized it, I'd read 120 pages. And it was 11:45 at night. It's sad. But good. Like a lemon cake that's sad. It's like a more literary Sarah Addison Allen--magical realism, emphasis on food, good description of time and place, only there's more ummph to it. Yes, ummph is the technical term for it. :P

The only thing that's a bit off-putting is the lack of punctuation. I get what the author is trying to do by not putting quotes around dialogue, but it's disconcerting. She also has some tense mishaps, which I find incredibly jarring. I *think* Aimee Bender is doing it on purpose, because it happened too many times for it to be just a miss on editing, but I'm not sure. It contributes to the immediacy of what's happening now, and is fitting since at the beginning, the narrator is only eight-going-on-nine. She also slips back and forth, time-line wise. The majority of the book is written in past perfect.

Prancer
09-06-2011, 09:47 PM
The only thing that's a bit off-putting is the lack of punctuation. I get what the author is trying to do by not putting quotes around dialogue, but it's disconcerting. She also has some tense mishaps, which I find incredibly jarring. I *think* Aimee Bender is doing it on purpose, because it happened too many times for it to be just a miss on editing, but I'm not sure. It contributes to the immediacy of what's happening now, and is fitting since at the beginning, the narrator is only eight-going-on-nine. She also slips back and forth, time-line wise. The majority of the book is written in past perfect.

I found it a very annoying read for those reasons. :shuffle:

Allen
09-06-2011, 10:24 PM
I found it a very annoying read for those reasons. :shuffle:

I wondered what you would think of it. I get that. Bender's writing has weird tense things going on throughout, so I'm assuming she does it on purpose. From a grammar standpoint, it's rather jarring, but I made myself get over it.

A writer who works in a similar genre (magical realism, updated fairy tales), but without the punctuation and tense issues is Kelly Link. She has three collections of stories. Stranger Things Happen and Magic for Beginners are both very fine collections in my opinion. Many of her stories are alson anthologized in best of collections. Her stories "Stone Animals" and "Catskin" are two of my favorite short stories.

I just started reading The Sisters Brothers by Patrick Dewitt, which was placed on the shortlist for the Mann Booker Prize. I'm not much for anything Western, but this is pretty cool so far. I would call it more of a revisionist Western. There were also promises of witches and indian zombies, so I thought it would be fun :)

Prancer
09-06-2011, 10:40 PM
I wondered what you would think of it. I get that. Bender's writing has weird tense things going on throughout, so I'm assuming she does it on purpose. From a grammar standpoint, it's rather jarring, but I made myself get over it.

I don't much care for magical realism in general, either, so I admired Bender's talent and the craft of the work, but I didn't particularly enjoy the experience. I found myself thinking too much about the writing and not the story.

I'm reading Tragedy in South Lebanon: The Israeli-Hezbollah War Of 2006 (http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Tragedy-in-South-Lebanon/Cathy-Sultan/e/9780979824982/). It is, as you would expect, depressing :(. The Lemon Tree: An Arab, a Jew, and the Heart of the Middle East (http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/lemon-tree-sandy-tolan/1006702535?ean=9781596919228&itm=1&usri=the%2blemon%2btree%2ban%2barab%2ba%2bjew%2ban d%2bthe%2bheart) is next, and I hope it is more uplifting.

I'm thinking of doing a class next year with a focus on conflict in the Middle East. I may think again :shuffle:.

Allen
09-06-2011, 10:49 PM
I
I'm reading Tragedy in South Lebanon: The Israeli-Hezbollah War Of 2006 (http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Tragedy-in-South-Lebanon/Cathy-Sultan/e/9780979824982/). It is, as you would expect, depressing :(. The Lemon Tree: An Arab, a Jew, and the Heart of the Middle East (http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/lemon-tree-sandy-tolan/1006702535?ean=9781596919228&itm=1&usri=the%2blemon%2btree%2ban%2barab%2ba%2bjew%2ban d%2bthe%2bheart) is next, and I hope it is more uplifting.

I'm thinking of doing a class next year with a focus on conflict in the Middle East. I may think again :shuffle:.

I'm thinking I might be interested in reading Tragedy in South Lebanon. I became very interested in that situation after seeing the Anthony Bourdain episode where he and his crew were stuck in a Beirut hotel while the American government basically did nothing to get them to safety. I received three different papers arguing that all people of Middle Eastern descent should be deported from the US.

Re: the class on the subject in the Middle East. I hope you're ready for the papers that class might generate. I was teaching Freshman comp when 9/11 happened and I had to ban papers that had anything to do with the middle east.