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Prancer
08-28-2011, 05:24 AM
It depends. The skater might be jealous and they might not be.

So might the fan.

That's what it's rather pointless, IMO, to try and identify motivation. A person can be jealous and have a point, or objective and not, among other possibilities. If you are assuming that you can tell the difference, you must also be assuming that you are objective enough on the subject to make a fair judgment. If you are a fan of Sasha's (or Rowling's, as the case may be), is your judgment more or less trustworthy than that of the critic?

And so on and so on.

So again--either a critique makes a point or it does not. The question, for me, is not what inspires does Holden say what he does, but is he right?

The same is true of Byatt. I actually disagree with her take on adult Potter fans (although I'm willing to consider that she might have a point), but I don't think she is even slightly inspired by jealousy. I don't think Byatt aspires to be Rowling.


I'm with you on this one, Prancer. I thought the writer was just being facetious with regard to his own work.

Yeah, I actually laughed when I read that and am :confused: that people are taking it seriously, but there you are. Holden is, I am sure, well aware of his shortcomings; if he isn't, he has plenty of critics to point them out.

IceAlisa
08-28-2011, 06:11 AM
And comedy is simply a funny way of being serious. Who said that?

galaxygirl
08-28-2011, 08:04 AM
So might the fan.

That's what it's rather pointless, IMO, to try and identify motivation. A person can be jealous and have a point, or objective and not, among other possibilities. If you are assuming that you can tell the difference, you must also be assuming that you are objective enough on the subject to make a fair judgment. If you are a fan of Sasha's (or Rowling's, as the case may be), is your judgment more or less trustworthy than that of the critic?

And so on and so on.

I'm responding on my phone which is probably a mistake since I can't see what I'm typing or responding to very well.

I actually agree with you, which was the point I was trying to make about generalizing, though obviously not very well. My observation about his motivation was just that, an observation. His dislike of the series doesn't bother me because it doesn't affect me enjoyment of it.

Btw, I do think I'm objective enough to make a fair judgement, though I'll admit that I read the article rather quickly and didn't give it too much thought. I seemed to me to be too passionate for simple dislike of the book, so I took that to be either a bit of jealousy or bitterness, but I guess that could just be his writing style. I might change my mind if I read the article more thoroughly, though I have no interest in doing so. :)



The same is true of Byatt. I actually disagree with her take on adult Potter fans (although I'm willing to consider that she might have a point), but I don't think she is even slightly inspired by jealousy. I don't think Byatt aspires to be Rowling.



I think I read her comments a while back but don't remember them, so I can't comment on them, but I guessing that when people say that she's jealous, they are probably referring to Byatt being jealous of Rowling's book sales and not her writing talent.

mkats
08-28-2011, 05:46 PM
As a huge Kate Middleton fan, I grabbed Claudia Joseph's "Kate Middleton: Princess in Waiting" when I saw it on the bookshelf yesterday at the library while trying to snag some entertainment during the storm. Unfortunately, it bored the hell out of me... the writing is dry and the first half of the book focuses on Kate's ancestors from every imagineable nook and cranny dating back to the 1850's before ever getting to its subject. However, the book was written in 2009 so I'll cut its content a little slack, but even the pictures were the same old ones that have been circulating for years :drama:

Moving on to The Handmaid's Tale. Anyone have any opinions on this one? I wasn't really keen on the description, but my friend absolutely adored it, so I decided to give it a try.

galaxygirl
08-28-2011, 05:52 PM
As a huge Kate Middleton fan, I grabbed Claudia Joseph's "Kate Middleton: Princess in Waiting" when I saw it on the bookshelf yesterday at the library while trying to snag some entertainment during the storm. Unfortunately, it bored the hell out of me... the writing is dry and the first half of the book focuses on Kate's ancestors from every imagineable nook and cranny dating back to the 1850's before ever getting to its subject. However, the book was written in 2009 so I'll cut its content a little slack, but even the pictures were the same old ones that have been circulating for years :drama:

Moving on to The Handmaid's Tale. Anyone have any opinions on this one? I wasn't really keen on the description, but my friend absolutely adored it, so I decided to give it a try.

I read it. I enjoyed it but I don't really get what all the fuss is about, to be honest. It's a quick read, though.

rfisher
08-28-2011, 05:55 PM
I think I read her comments a while back but don't remember them, so I can't comment on them, but I guessing that when people say that she's jealous, they are probably referring to Byatt being jealous of Rowling's book sales and not her writing talent.

Speaking for myself, I'd rather have JKR's book sales than any author's writing talent. :lol: Talent is in the eye of the beholder. A nice bank account trumps critical acclaim.

Nomad
08-28-2011, 06:57 PM
As far as Byatt vs. Rowling, to me they're just talented in different ways. Personally, I'd like Byatt's talent and Rowling's bank account.

PrincessLeppard
08-28-2011, 07:44 PM
Moving on to The Handmaid's Tale. Anyone have any opinions on this one? I wasn't really keen on the description, but my friend absolutely adored it, so I decided to give it a try.

I teach it in my Dystopian Lit class, and some of the kids really love it, most of them miss the black humor and I had a few girls say they would like to live in that society because "women are protected." :scream:

I really like the book. :)

oleada
08-28-2011, 07:47 PM
I love that book. It's great and creepy.

Nomad
08-28-2011, 07:50 PM
I did, too. Has anyone read The Blind Assassin? I picked it up at the Goodwill because it was less than a dollar but haven't really sampled it yet.

Erin
08-28-2011, 07:51 PM
Moving on to The Handmaid's Tale. Anyone have any opinions on this one? I wasn't really keen on the description, but my friend absolutely adored it, so I decided to give it a try.

I enjoy Atwood, but procrastinated forever before reading The Handmaid's Tale because I was also not very keen on the description...I generally don't care for either sci-fi or dystopian novels, so I didn't think it would be my thing. I ended up loving it, it's probably Atwood's best. The story itself is just interesting on its own, and I also appreciate the point that Atwood's trying to make. I'm glad you're giving it a try.

galaxygirl
08-28-2011, 08:09 PM
Re: The Handmaid's Tale


most of them miss the black humor


I wonder if this is my problem with the book. I tend to be overly literal and often miss the subtler stuff.

Prancer
08-28-2011, 08:11 PM
I actually agree with you, which was the point I was trying to make about generalizing, though obviously not very well

No, I got that we were in agreement; I was just expanding on the theme.:)


when people say that she's jealous, they are probably referring to Byatt being jealous of Rowling's book sales and not her writing talent.

But if Byatt wanted better book sales (and Byatt is very successful in her own right, although not as successful as Rowling), she would write different books, or at least try to. Byatt clearly does not aspire to write blockbuster bestsellers; not all writers do. Look at how Jonathan Franzen reacted to being selected for Oprah's book club. Same with Holden--one does not write books about Shakespeare and expect to sell millions.

The Handmaid's Tale doesn't sound like a book I would like, either, but I still thought it was excellent.

Cachoo
08-28-2011, 08:21 PM
I teach it in my Dystopian Lit class, and some of the kids really love it, most of them miss the black humor and I had a few girls say they would like to live in that society because "women are protected." :scream:

I really like the book. :)

Oh my God.

Erin
08-28-2011, 08:25 PM
I did, too. Has anyone read The Blind Assassin? I picked it up at the Goodwill because it was less than a dollar but haven't really sampled it yet.

I love 90% of The Blind Assassin...the only part I really don't like is the sci-fi story the man tells his lover in the novel within the novel (I realize this probably doesn't make a lot of sense right now but it will). But the parts about the sisters growing up are wonderful. I'd still highly recommend reading it. I found on re-read that I really didn't miss much by skimming/skipping the sci-fi part I didn't care for and it's not a huge part of the book.