PDA

View Full Version : A Book is Like a Garden in Your Pocket



Pages : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 [52] 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67

IceAlisa
08-27-2011, 08:29 PM
I've got your back. I wasn't even all impressed with the first book. I thought Anthony Holden (http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2000/jun/25/booksforchildrenandteenagers.guardianchildrensfict ionprize2000)pretty much nailed it--and it's not like I have highbrow tastes.

I find this interesting:
If people were fighting to buy Seamus Heaney's sizzling translation of Beowulf, or David Cairns's riproaring biography of Berlioz, or even my own action-packed life of Shakespeare, I would naturally be uncorking champagne and running jaunty standards up the nation's literary flagpoles.

I spy the green-eyed monster. :shuffle:

There is nothing high brow about the series unless you count the occasional literary and historical references, the Latin and the French. The magic is that it's highly entertaining IMO. But of course there will be exceptions as is the case with pretty much everything.

I will concede however, that the quality of writing is um...at times lacking, especially when it comes to dramatic scenes. She does every day dialogue well.

PrincessLeppard
08-27-2011, 08:31 PM
It's okay if people don't like a book. It doesn't make them jealous.

However, people who actually enjoyed Mockingjay should be flogged, as clearly they have no literary taste at all.

;)

rfisher
08-27-2011, 08:33 PM
:lol: I expect a whole lot of authors snark about JKR's phenomenal success and her bank account. They can raise their noses all they want. And keep their day jobs to pay the bills.

IceAlisa
08-27-2011, 08:34 PM
It's okay if people don't like a book. It doesn't make them jealous. Yes, of course it's OK in most cases. But I find it interesting that the author of the article chose to lament the fact that his own book isn't flying off the shelves while complaining about the unwashed masses lining up for HP. It's not exactly classy.

Here's another criticism that I find invalid:

Her characters, unlike life's, are all black-and-white .

Granted, this was written in 2000 when the characters were black and white. However, today I can make a good case that the characters of Dumbledore and Snape are hardly black and white, for starters. Dumbledore especially makes an interesting study of a "fearless leader", complete with totalitarian thinking. Also, even in the early books Hermione's character was infused with quite a bit of irony and even gentle mockery of her know-it-all, book-smart attitude.


Harry's dead parents were uncomplicatedly good. Oh but that's no longer true. Again, it seemed true back in 2000 but James has been presented in less than flattering light since.

Yes, the plot is formulaic and predictable. What makes the book enjoyable to me are the imaginative details and JKR's wit. The humorlessness of the LOTR series made it completely unreadable for me.

galaxygirl
08-27-2011, 08:47 PM
Seriously, I am not a fan and refuse to keep drinking the HP koolaid. At some point I'll probably read the last book, just because I have it and it is gathering dust under my bed, but, no, I am most definitely not a fan of the series as a whole, only of the first 2 books.

Why would you read the final book if you dislike the series so much? For that matter, why did you read through book six? Why torture yourself?

emason
08-27-2011, 10:20 PM
I've got your back. I wasn't even all impressed with the first book. I thought Anthony Holden (http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2000/jun/25/booksforchildrenandteenagers.guardianchildrensfict ionprize2000)pretty much nailed it--and it's not like I have highbrow tastes.

Thanks, Prancer. I really enjoyed reading that.

oleada
08-28-2011, 12:15 AM
What I love about Harry Potter is the ability JK Rowling has to completely develop and immerse you in a completely different world. And I completely disagree about the characters being black and white.

PDilemma
08-28-2011, 12:28 AM
I've got your back. I wasn't even all impressed with the first book. I thought Anthony Holden (http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2000/jun/25/booksforchildrenandteenagers.guardianchildrensfict ionprize2000)pretty much nailed it--and it's not like I have highbrow tastes.

If Rowling got him that wound up, I certainly hope no one gave him a copy of Twilight.

Prancer
08-28-2011, 02:13 AM
I spy the green-eyed monster. :shuffle:

I took it as dry humor, myself.


It's okay if people don't like a book. It doesn't make them jealous.

Yes, thank you. And even if you assume jealousy, a person can be biased and still have a point.

To me, this sums up HP very well:

the Potter saga was essentially patronising, very conservative, highly derivative, dispiritingly nostalgic for a bygone Britain which only ever existed at Greyfriars and St Trinian's.

I can't imagine getting lost in the world she creates, as I find that world almost offensive (and I actually don't find her powers of description that effective). So many things about the culture of Harry Potter grate on me terribly.

I realize that most people don't see the books that way, and that's cool and all. I'm not trying to argue with anyone about it. If you enjoy them, you enjoy them. But people who don't enjoy them aren't necessarily wrong in the head or heart or just in need of a few more pages.


If Rowling got him that wound up, I certainly hope no one gave him a copy of Twilight.

I think that most if not all of the Whitbread panel were offended that HP was nominated. I don't think there's any risk at all of that happening with Twilight.

His take is actually pretty mild compared to AS Byatt's slam on adult HP fans. :shuffle:

rfisher
08-28-2011, 02:26 AM
Aw. And Byatt's bank account balance compared to JKR's has nothing to do with the matter I'm certain. :lol: If she'd made no money, they wouldn't care.

The fact that Harry appeals to a broad spectrum of age speaks volumes to me. I don't care if someone doesn't like the books, but it annoys me when they try to play the highbrow card. People like what they like and book snobs are just insecure prats like all snobs.

Prancer
08-28-2011, 03:01 AM
Aw. And Byatt's bank account balance compared to JKR's has nothing to do with the matter I'm certain. :lol: If she'd made no money, they wouldn't care.

To me, there is no difference between saying that and saying that if you don't like, say, Sasha Cohen, it's because you are jealous. Either a critique has merit or it does not.

rfisher
08-28-2011, 03:12 AM
If a skater who was less successful (financially or otherwise) than Sasha said they didn't like her, I would indeed think jealously was present. If a fan says they don't like her, they just don't like her. There are critiques and then there are critiques.

Prancer
08-28-2011, 03:21 AM
If a skater who was less successful (financially or otherwise) than Sasha said they didn't like her, I would indeed think jealously was present. If a fan says they don't like her, they just don't like her. There are critiques and then there are critiques.

So if a low-level skater says that Sasha was a disappointment because she cracked under pressure, it's jealousy, but if a fan says it, it's just dislike?

If you find that reasonable, so be it, but that makes no sense to me at all.

galaxygirl
08-28-2011, 04:02 AM
So if a low-level skater says that Sasha was a disappointment because she cracked under pressure, it's jealousy, but if a fan says it, it's just dislike?

If you find that reasonable, so be it, but that makes no sense to me at all.

It depends. The skater might be jealous and they might not be. People who don't like HP might be jealous of Rowling or they might not be. You can't really generalize. However, in the case of the author of the article you linked to, it does seem, to me, that part of his problem is jealousy or bitterness. I'm not articulate like you and many others on this board :), so I can't really tell you why I got that impression from the article, but I did.

emason
08-28-2011, 04:12 AM
I took it as dry humor, myself.


I'm with you on this one, Prancer. I thought the writer was just being facetious with regard to his own work.