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BigB08822
08-16-2011, 06:55 AM
I've tried and tried but I can't get into The Book Thief...

*awaits :lynch:*

Nevermind, misunderstood. :shuffle:

PrincessLeppard
08-16-2011, 12:12 PM
I've tried and tried but I can't get into The Book Thief...

*awaits :lynch:*

The first time I tried it, I didn't really like it. But about a week later, I started it again, and really enjoyed it. The first person observer narration takes a bit of getting used to (but I'm so glad I have a good example of it to use with my students!) because it's so rare, but it really is a well done book.

Artemis@BC
08-16-2011, 08:02 PM
I also added the first two in the Millenium Trilogy. I've seen the movies but I know the books will be better.

IMO, this is one of those rare cases where the movies might have a slight edge over the books. At least it was for Dragon Tattoo. I found that the book was very poorly paced compared to the movie, and also included reams of background blather into the politics & corporate dealings that had zero interest for me, and contributed very little to the story.

But the book was better in terms of character development. And I haven't read books 2 & 3 yet, just seen the movies.

Allen
08-16-2011, 08:18 PM
IMO, this is one of those rare cases where the movies might have a slight edge over the books. At least it was for Dragon Tattoo. I found that the book was very poorly paced compared to the movie, and also included reams of background blather into the politics & corporate dealings that had zero interest for me, and contributed very little to the story.

But the book was better in terms of character development. And I haven't read books 2 & 3 yet, just seen the movies.


I feel like the books got better as they series went along, whereas the films were progressively less good. That said, I did enjoy all 3 films, but the first is definitely the best of the three.

BigB08822
08-16-2011, 08:26 PM
The main reason for me to get the books is that I felt like there was so much going on in the movies that I just did not understand. I think the books probably had way too much information than they could fit in the movie. I would like to read the book and watch the movie again, I bet it will make a lot more sense.

oleada
08-16-2011, 08:29 PM
You also didn't love Before I Go to Sleep, so you obviously have NO taste. :P

Pfft. My taste is very selective :P

gkelly
08-16-2011, 08:52 PM
I feel like the books got better as they series went along

I disagree.

I thought all three books were filled with too much extraneous detail. But I liked the first one best because there was a coherent central mystery, whereas the second and third were more like pure thriller (albeit bogged down by all those people I couldn't keep track of).

So it's maybe more that I just have a strong preference between genres rather than a judgment of objective quality, assuming such a thing is possible.

jeffisjeff
08-16-2011, 09:02 PM
I disagree.

Me too. I liked them all, but by the third one, I just didn't get into as much.

Artemis@BC
08-16-2011, 09:22 PM
The main reason for me to get the books is that I felt like there was so much going on in the movies that I just did not understand. I think the books probably had way too much information than they could fit in the movie. I would like to read the book and watch the movie again, I bet it will make a lot more sense.

Well, that makes sense. And I do plan to read books 2 & 3 before too long. Just haven't got around to it yet.

So many books, so little time ...

IceAlisa
08-19-2011, 08:06 AM
I am only about to the page 300 of The Children's Book. Strangely, it reminded me of a collection of Russian fairy tales called The Malachite Casket (http://www.amazon.com/Malachite-Casket-Tales-Pavel-Bazhov/dp/1589637313), one of my favorite books as a kid. It's very Russian. What reminded me of this was the relationship between Philip and Fludd. There is a similar story in the Malachite Casket about a master craftsman, a jeweler IIRC, who despaired of finding a worthy apprentice, who was very moody and treated his failed apprentices like crap. Finally he found an orphan boy who displayed an prodigious talent for his craft. The old master was bewitched by this kid and raised him as his own, no longer grumpy but a loving and protective surrogate parent.

The whole creative process described in The Children's Book, which was very well done indeed, reminds me of such descriptions of the Malachite Casket, along with the fairy stories. I am not saying Byatt "borrowed" her ideas. As far as I know, she probably has never heard of this book. But the similarities are noteworthy and interesting. And I wholeheartedly recommend The Malachite Casket to the lovers of fairy tales and folklore although I cannot comment on the quality of the translation.

I disagree with some amazon reviewers that The Children's Book is overstuffed. I think everything belongs. If a Byatt book was overstuffed, it was Possession IMO. It's undoubtedly rich, descriptive and evocative but nothing is superfluous. I find reading this book peaceful. Had a nice time sipping latte in a cafe (I know, I know), reading this book today in between seeing patients.

flyingsit
08-19-2011, 12:46 PM
Has anyone read The Unnamed by Joshua Ferris? I really got caught up in it the other night and it left me very melancholy.

rfisher
08-19-2011, 01:08 PM
No, but I'll mark it off my list. I don't do melancholy.

What treasures at 40-60% off will Borders offer today?

Rex
08-19-2011, 01:19 PM
Being a big ocean liner geek, I am frustrated at the lack of good coffee table books on the subject. :fragile: Some of them are woefully expensive on Amazon too.

I did order a book on Golden Age of Hollywood dish, and can I just tell you how woefully disappointing it was? :fragile:

Has anyone read Rules of Civility by Amor Towles? I'm a sucker for 1930s New York melodrama too, and the reviews I've read have been mostly positive.

my little pony
08-19-2011, 01:56 PM
i'm somewhere in the 700s in the book of children. since it is coming to the end, i wish there was more not less. excellent recommendation! i may not have bought it since in my book store it was on the highest shelf and i couldnt that it was there.

jeffisjeff
08-19-2011, 02:34 PM
Has anyone read The Unnamed by Joshua Ferris? I really got caught up in it the other night and it left me very melancholy.

I did. I liked it, but it does leave you a bit :fragile: .