PDA

View Full Version : A Book is Like a Garden in Your Pocket



Pages : 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67

pat c
06-15-2011, 09:36 PM
I'm looking for medical mystery authors. Any suggestions?

Thanks

jeffisjeff
06-15-2011, 09:53 PM
I'm looking for medical mystery authors. Any suggestions?

Thanks

Robin Cook and Michael Crichton are the first to come to mind - but their works may be more thrillers than mysteries.

rfisher
06-15-2011, 10:54 PM
I'm looking for medical mystery authors. Any suggestions?

Thanks

Tess Garritson's Rizzoli and Isles are sort of medical mysteries in that one of characters is a forensic pathologist.

rfisher
06-15-2011, 11:01 PM
I'm listening to the White Lioness by Henning Mankell in the car. I have a couple of his books and haven't gotten around to reading them, but now I will. They aren't mysteries in the sense that the reader doesn't know whodunit. I like Wallender as a character, but Mankell jumps around with different characters POV and it get's confusing and throws you out of the action. We're half way through the book and he's introducing new characters. I don't think Mankell read the show don't tell memo. :lol:

The book I have in my TBR cubicle (there are 3 of them with about 30 books :shuffle: ) is Faceless Killers. It's not very long so hopefully there will be less jumping and fewer characters.

IceAlisa
06-15-2011, 11:09 PM
Tess Garritson's Rizzoli and Isles are sort of medical mysteries in that one of characters is a forensic pathologist.

My mom would like that. I am reading A Severed Head (http://www.amazon.com/Severed-Head-Iris-Murdoch/dp/0140020039/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1308175586&sr=8-1) by Iris Murdoch.

So far so good. I find myself interested in the characters' neuroses although they are banal and old as sin, in a Woody Allenesque way.

jeffisjeff
06-15-2011, 11:33 PM
I'm listening to the White Lioness by Henning Mankell in the car. I have a couple of his books and haven't gotten around to reading them, but now I will. They aren't mysteries in the sense that the reader doesn't know whodunit. I like Wallender as a character, but Mankell jumps around with different characters POV and it get's confusing and throws you out of the action. We're half way through the book and he's introducing new characters. I don't think Mankell read the show don't tell memo. :lol:

I've read all of the Wallender books, and some of Mankell's other books. While I've enjoyed most of his books quite a bit, I must say that books like White Lioness, which takes us all over the world, are some of my least favorites. IMO Mankell is better when he sticks closer to home and doesn't delve too deeply into world events and politics.

Prancer
06-16-2011, 01:01 AM
I'm looking for medical mystery authors. Any suggestions?

Thanks

Joshua Spanogle and Peter Clement, maybe?

Japanfan
06-16-2011, 10:23 AM
Robin Cook and Michael Crichton are the first to come to mind - but their works may be more thrillers than mysteries.

Robin Cook is one of the worst. published authors. ever. He got a name after he wrote the medical thriller 'Coma' (in the 80s I think?) and has been publishing bad books ever since. I think I enjoyed one or two of the earlier works despite the poor writing and terrible dialogue, but his capacity for story-telling has really disintegrated.

jen_faith
06-16-2011, 10:47 AM
I don't know if you are interested in historical medical mystery series or not but Ruth Downie's Medicus books are not bad. They're set in Roman Britain and the main character is a bit down on his luck. Remarkably, for a Roman mystery series, Caesar, Pompey, Cato, Mark Antony, and Cleopatra do NOT make an appearance (at least not yet). It's a bit of a refreshing difference. The books are reasonably well written and a bit wry. I liked them. Didn't *love* them, but they were a not bad read. Link here (http://www.amazon.com/Medicus-Novel-Empire-Ruth-Downie/dp/1596914270/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1308216999&sr=8-2) to the first book.



I'm looking for medical mystery authors. Any suggestions?

Thanks

Buzz
06-16-2011, 02:12 PM
On my second Elizabeth Chadwick novel called "The Greatest Knight". Inspired by the real life antics of 12th century knight William Marshal. His real life story is as good as or better than the novel. It is said he was cursed so that his sons will never bear him grand sons and it may be true because five sons altogether had only 1 child in all a girl, strange but true. He also served four kings before dying in his mid seventies. Fascinating man.

Rex
06-16-2011, 02:23 PM
I'm trying to find shipping magnate Albert Ballin's bio. He founded the Hamburg-Amerika Line. For some reason, the book is not available in the US. I hate it when that happens...

Artemis@BC
06-16-2011, 05:00 PM
I'm looking for medical mystery authors. Any suggestions?

Another good historical forensic mystery series is the Brother Cadfael books by Ellis Peters. The protagonist is a monk with extensive knowledge of botany (as well as humanity, thanks to his pre-monastic life as a Crusader), which he puts to good use every time there's a murder nearby. Add to that the backdrop of the "The Anarchy" (the 12th century civil war bw Stephen and Maud), and you've got some great reading!

zaphyre14
06-16-2011, 05:56 PM
I love the Brother Cadfael mysteries and the Medicus series; I tend toward the historical mysteries because I like detectives who use their heads to figure out whodunit rather than all kinds of whiz-bang technology.

I also have Chadwick's "The Greatest Knight" near the top of my TBR pile. I enjoy her character developmen and she really makes the past come alive. But this is the beginning of summer and I'm into the mindless-trash phase. "Angel Light" is pretty lame and after that I think I have a couple of frothy romances lined up. Plus Stephanie Plum #17 comes out on the 21st to totally rot my brain.

rfisher
06-16-2011, 06:38 PM
Plus Stephanie Plum #17 comes out on the 21st to totally rot my brain.

Better than Plum is Carolyn Haines new Southern Belle mystery coming out the same day. :cheer2: Haines is a much better writer.

I loved the Cadfael series also. And Derek Jacobi was brilliant on the PBS adaptations.

Prancer
06-16-2011, 11:54 PM
Joshua Spanogle and Peter Clement, maybe?

And Ken McClure (http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-lazarus-strain-ken-mcclure/1021384960?ean=9780749079079&itm=1&usri=ken%2bmcclure). I've never read his books, but I know someone who likes them a lot.