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galaxygirl
08-06-2011, 06:27 PM
Zone One (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/10365343-zone-one) by Colson Whitehead is a zombie book due out in October. It's a 'literary' book, so it might not be any fun. :)

I recently finished In the Garden of Beasts (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/9938498-in-the-garden-of-beasts) by Erik Larson, which was quite good, and Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/10428902-miss-peregrine-s-home-for-peculiar-children), which was okay.

I'm in the preface of Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6572270-bloodlands) by Timothy Snyder. And I've read the first chapter or so of The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6525011-the-physick-book-of-deliverance-dane) by Katherine Howe. I'm not sure I'll be able to finish them soon because they're library e-books and I only have 3 weeks to finish both of them AND I have two other books on hold, one of which just became available and the other will be available shortly, the latter of which is for a book group so I really should read it. I'd really rather read Bloodlands, though.

BTW, what's the difference between a preface, prologue, introduction and forward?

PrincessLeppard
08-06-2011, 07:12 PM
The First Days by Rhiannon Frater. It won some kind of award for a first novel.

Borders is going to be the death of me. I just bought 10 books to go along with the 15 or so I've already bought. :shuffle: Tomorrow was the end of the extra 10% for a Border's Plus card.

I'm waiting for everything to drop to 60-75% off before I make one more foray through the store.

The 10% was extended through Sunday. In case you need to go back. :saint:

I haven't read The First Days. Let me know how it is.


Zone One (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/10365343-zone-one) by Colson Whitehead is a zombie book due out in October. It's a 'literary' book, so it might not be any fun. :)

:P I would argue that World War Z is literary. Some may argue otherwise. They probably own poodles or something...

Spinner
08-06-2011, 07:17 PM
Yup! I'm mostly interested in all the religious and political machinations. Screw Henry VIII and his wives, that's kinda boring. :rofl:
You really should check out David Eddings' second fantasy series of books. There are two sets of 3 books each in the series--the first set is The Elenium, 2nd is The Tamuli. The church is heinously corrupt and controls the ruling bodies too. The bad boy hero knight Sparhawk is set on thwarting it.

Though I really enjoyed his first series a lot and have read them many times, I find the Sparhawk series to be much more gritty, mature, intricate and darker in the storytelling. Start with The Diamond Throne (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/68805.The_Diamond_Throne).

rfisher
08-06-2011, 07:42 PM
The 10% was extended through Sunday. In case you need to go back. :saint:

I haven't read The First Days. Let me know how it is.



:P I would argue that World War Z is literary. Some may argue otherwise. They probably own poodles or something...

Since Allure has declared the Standard Poodle to be an example of classiness, I have decided that whatever I read is also an example of classiness. BTW, they considered literary books to be pretentious and crassie. Just sayin.....:P Well, actually, they're pretentious only if people try to insist they are classy. Which means I don't have to care whether it's classy, crass or tacky. :)

Nomad
08-06-2011, 10:08 PM
I've spent most of the day reading The Bloody Chamber, Angela Carter's retelling of Perrault's fairy tales. Fabulous style, although the story where the father rapes his dead daughter was...er...challenging.

zaphyre14
08-07-2011, 02:46 AM
I finished "...Dragon Tattoo" and enjoyed it but I'm taking a break before the next one. Instead, I plunged into C.S. Harris' new Sebastian St. Cyr Regency mystery, "When Shadows Dance." As usual, she hooked me from the first chapter and I'm devouring the rest in huge gulps, much to my dog's disgust, because it's my day off and he thinks we should spend the day outside.

Prancer
08-07-2011, 02:58 AM
BTW, what's the difference between a preface, prologue, introduction and forward?

Theoretically:

A preface is an explanation for why an author wrote a work.

An introduction lays the groundwork for the work by setting out background or arguments that led to the work.

Introductions and prefaces are very similar, but a preface is usually personal, while an introduction is usually more objective. The terms are often used interchangably and there can be quite a bit of overlap between them.

A foreword is usually (but not always) written by someone other than the author and generally exists to talk about how awesome the author is OR (if the author of the book writes the foreword) to allow the author to talk about how awesome the author's friends and supporters are.

A prologue is supposed to provide a brief history or short background of the story; it may summarize that history or describe a specific pivotal event.

PRlady
08-07-2011, 03:38 AM
I have taken a detour from The Children's Book. I had renewed my library card and happened to snag Jennifer Weiner's In Her Shoes. Yup, that's the one the movie Cameron Diaz, Tori Colette and Shirley MacLane was based on. One of the attractions was the e.e. cummings poem--I am a sucker for e.e. cummings.

Otherwise, I expected this to be your usual summer read chick litty stuff. I was pleasantly surprised when I found it well-written and the characters engaging. It's still rather chick litty but so what.



Despite mlp's terrible tales of Jennifer Weiner, she's one of the few chick-lit writers I love. Not as much as Joanna Trollope, who is the most readable chick-lit writer evah as far asI'm concerned, but really good. I just finished Weiner's new one about surrogate moms, not as good as In Her Shoes, actually.

And now I am reading porn. Don't ask me why I am reading porn or why I just didn't delete it when I realized what I had, but I'm determined to finish it. Sort of a modern-day Story of O but not nearly as titillating as when I read that as a very young woman.

IceAlisa
08-07-2011, 03:44 AM
What terrible tales? mlp didn't like In Her Shoes? :drama:
I read Story Of O in French in my 20s. I felt ever so sophisticated. :lol:
What Joanna Trollope book do you recommend? Never heard of her but our reading tastes seem to coincide a lot.

PRlady
08-07-2011, 03:49 AM
What Joanna Trollope book do you recommend? Never heard of her but our reading tastes seem to coincide a lot.

Every. Single. One. Of Them. Seriously. I guess "Marrying the Mistress" and "Other People's Children" are the ones that stick with me the most, but she writes so realistically and well about families -- the moms, the dads, the kids, the outsiders, the unusual families. And all her characters have a point of view, and none of them are plastic heroines or villains.

They're all in paperback.

IceAlisa
08-07-2011, 04:41 AM
Thanks, off to make more requests in the library. :)

Spinner
08-07-2011, 07:54 AM
Anyone ready anything by Mary Doria Russell? A friend suggested her to me and curious what others think.

galaxygirl
08-07-2011, 04:47 PM
Theoretically:

A preface is an explanation for why an author wrote a work.

An introduction lays the groundwork for the work by setting out background or arguments that led to the work.

Introductions and prefaces are very similar, but a preface is usually personal, while an introduction is usually more objective. The terms are often used interchangably and there can be quite a bit of overlap between them.

A foreword is usually (but not always) written by someone other than the author and generally exists to talk about how awesome the author is OR (if the author of the book writes the foreword) to allow the author to talk about how awesome the author's friends and supporters are.

A prologue is supposed to provide a brief history or short background of the story; it may summarize that history or describe a specific pivotal event.

Thanks! I've started to read more non-fiction so these definitions will come in handy.


Anyone ready anything by Mary Doria Russell? A friend suggested her to me and curious what others think.

I read about 95% of The Sparrow. Mostly I remember the phrase 'and they laughed' and wanting to through the book across the room because I hated the characters so much (though you are really meant to love them). I refrained from throwing the book only because it was a library book.

Everybody else seems to love her, though.

emason
08-07-2011, 05:12 PM
Everybody else seems to love her, though.

Not everybody. I started The Sparrow years ago and gave up fairly early on. Could not get into it at all.

mkats
08-07-2011, 05:58 PM
I was annoyed by Weir's other two historical novels, one on Elizabeth I and the other a horror about Eleanor of Aquitaine that was mostly porn.

Oh jeez, is it like that all the way through? I was hoping Captive Queen would be some lighter fluffy bedtime reading in between reading Never Let Me Go at lunch (which I'm really enjoying!) but all I've gotten so far is about ten pages of porn and zero plot.