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galaxygirl
08-03-2011, 01:52 PM
As travel books go this one is sad and heart breaking. It talks about people who got sent to the Gulags for making comments or jokes about the regime that they did not like. But it is also scattered with bits of hope and light and so far it has me captivated. A very worthwhile read. :respec:

Awesome! I've added it to my list. :)

PrincessLeppard
08-03-2011, 02:14 PM
In true Stephenson fashion, it's almost 1000 pages :lol:

In that 1000 pages, does anyone get eaten? I'm not wading through 1000 pages if no one gets eaten.

rfisher
08-03-2011, 02:29 PM
In that 1000 pages, does anyone get eaten? I'm not wading through 1000 pages if no one gets eaten.

Or at least shot or beheaded or f*cked. Otherwise, what's the point? :lol:

PrincessLeppard
08-03-2011, 02:47 PM
Speaking of your third point, the book I'm reading (The Werewolf Upstairs...it's....not good), the heroine (or whatever) turns down the smokin' hawt werewolf's request for sex because she sprained her ankle.

In the list of things that would make me not want to have sex with a smokin' hawt werewolf....that would not be on there. ;)

TygerLily
08-03-2011, 06:41 PM
This article made me think about the e-book vs. paper book discussions: Every book wanted by internet pioneer (http://www.cbc.ca/news/offbeat/story/2011/08/01/kahle-books-archive.html)

Also, I just realized that I've been stealing book ideas from this thread without giving ideas.

I just finished Regeneration, the first book in Pat Barker's Regeneration Trilogy. It was fascinating -- starring Siegfried Sassoon and Dr. W.H.R. Rivers, with appearances by Wilfred Owen and Robert Graves. I got the trilogy from my aunt who is an avid reader and another avid reading aunt also highly recommended it. I've read Graves's Good-bye to All That and some British and Canadian WWI poetry, so this was a great fictional counterpoint.

I decided I needed some fluff before moving onto the second book in the trilogy, so I'm trying Karin Slaughter. Scary stuff! Has anyone read her? Is it important to read her series in order? I just jumped from the first book to the fourth book in the series and feel a little but not a lot jolted. I imagine I could keep going, but am worried this book might give away too much from the books I missed.

I'm also reading Wayson Choy's The Jade Peony, which is about the Chinese community in BC. It feels like a collection of interconnected novellas more than a novel novel, so I've put it down between sections for the above fluff.

aliceanne
08-03-2011, 07:52 PM
I read "Jaws" this summer (don't laugh I haven't seen the movie either). As a beach person I felt I should. The parts describing the shark were good, but the rest was a typical guy-authored pulp novel (gratuitous sex scenes, male posturing, blood and guts... It was a good light read but I already knew the shark risks so it won't keep me out of the water.

I also have almost finished "Villette" by Charlotte Bronte. It is slow going and I can't decide if it is riveting or boring. It reminds me of those novels that were popular in the 60's and 70's (Hesse, Vonnegut, etc). A lot of stream of consciousness and introspection, even a drug-induced dream sequence. A total about-face from "Jane Eyre".

It is presumed to be autobiographical and was written near the end of Bronte's life after she has lost all of her siblings. The main character is a total introvert. What is interesting is how "off" her recollections and observations are because she is so socially isolated. You hear Lucy describe the action, and then later in the book you hear another character describe the same scene and realize that Lucy has left out a key fact for the reader.

IceAlisa
08-03-2011, 08:10 PM
On what beach does Jaws action take place? I've been told the movie was shot on Long Beach Island, NJ.

Southpaw
08-03-2011, 08:16 PM
On what beach does Jaws action take place? I've been told the movie was shot on Long Beach Island, NJ.

Amity Island. Amity means "Friendship" and Amity Island is no different! That's a bad hat, Harry.

A lot of the movie was filmed on Nantucket.

aliceanne
08-04-2011, 02:20 PM
On what beach does Jaws action take place? I've been told the movie was shot on Long Beach Island, NJ.

Supposedly the idea for book came from a series of fatal shark attacks in 1906 in the Matawan River and off of Beach Haven, NJ. The theory is that it was either a young great white or a bull shark. Large sharks close to shore are extremely rare in that area. I can't remember any sightings or attacks in my lifetime.

rfisher
08-04-2011, 02:23 PM
25% off at borders including audiobooks, 40% on romances, Borders Plus extended through Sunday.

FigureSpins
08-04-2011, 04:01 PM
I didn't see this posted yet - Jaycee Dugard, who was abducted at age 11 and held captive for 18 years, has written a memoir.

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/stolen-life-jaycee-dugard/1100571658?ean=9781451629187&itm=1&usri=jaycee%2bdugard

I don't think I have the heart to read it, myself. I'd be crying my way through, I'm sure.

She is donating part of the book proceeds to her JAYC Foundation.
http://thejaycfoundation.org/

orientalplane
08-04-2011, 04:31 PM
II also have almost finished "Villette" by Charlotte Bronte. It is slow going and I can't decide if it is riveting or boring. It reminds me of those novels that were popular in the 60's and 70's (Hesse, Vonnegut, etc). A lot of stream of consciousness and introspection, even a drug-induced dream sequence. A total about-face from "Jane Eyre".

It is presumed to be autobiographical and was written near the end of Bronte's life after she has lost all of her siblings. The main character is a total introvert. What is interesting is how "off" her recollections and observations are because she is so socially isolated. You hear Lucy describe the action, and then later in the book you hear another character describe the same scene and realize that Lucy has left out a key fact for the reader.

Well, I've never heard of Charlotte Bronte being compared to Vonnegut! :lol: I don't think it's a 'total about-face' from Jane Eyre at all; nor is Lucy Snowe a total introvert. She is full of passion and life beneath her quiet exterior, which is the reason she cannot cope with the social isolation when the school breaks up for summer. She loves and needs company, and finds it almost impossible to bear when she has to manage by herself - quite unlike Jane in this respect.

Parts of it are likely to have some autobiographical content, but it would be more true to say that the time abroad was inspired by her own experience, and not a faithful re-telling of it. It's a challenging book and not everyone likes it, but in my mind there's no stream of consciousness in the conventional meaning of the phrase.

Keep reading; for one thing there's a highly unexpected ending (though it took me about a month to recover from it).

It's one of my favourite novels.

IceAlisa
08-04-2011, 05:07 PM
Supposedly the idea for book came from a series of fatal shark attacks in 1906 in the Matawan River and off of Beach Haven, NJ. The theory is that it was either a young great white or a bull shark.

:eek: How did a shark get into fresh water?? Was it drunk?

Southpaw
08-04-2011, 05:09 PM
:eek: How did a shark get into fresh water?? Was it drunk?

The Matawan River flows into a bay that flows into the ocean.

And yes, the shark WAS drunk. Spent a little too much time at Irish Pub in Atlantic City that day.

jeffisjeff
08-04-2011, 05:10 PM
:eek: How did a shark get into fresh water?? Was it drunk?

Bull sharks frequently swim up river and do OK in fresh water. Or so I learned from River Monsters.