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IceAlisa
07-27-2011, 04:05 AM
Oh no, rfisher, I wouldn't want you to read a book by Byatt with me. You'd hate me forever. :yikes:

my little pony
07-27-2011, 04:08 AM
I actually have The Children's Book waiting. Would be nice to read it with an FSU buddy. :shuffle:

hmmm, nothing lures me out of lurkdom like a good Possession reference

if borders still has it when i go back on sat, i will pick it up

IceAlisa
07-27-2011, 04:11 AM
We will then go to therapy together, traumatized by the verbose and overstuffed narrative. Therapy with mlp would be fun. :D

Michalle
07-27-2011, 12:02 PM
I liked Possession at first but if a book ever needed to be trimmed, it was that one... it just went on and on and on, long after it was so so obvious what had happened. At 300 pages, it would have been an amazing book... at 550, I lost patience around 400.

oleada
07-27-2011, 11:56 PM
I'm with Rfisher on this one. I think I'd rather watch paint dry.

I had to take a break from Soccernomics. The book is divided into three sections (the clubs, the fans, the countries), and while I breezed through the first one, I'm finding the "Fans" section much more difficult to get through.

Meanwhile, I finished The Sky is Everywhere by Jandy Nelson. Wyliefan, if you're still looking for good YA reads, I totally recommend this one. This is the third time I had tried to start it, and the previous times I had difficulty getting into it, finding it a bit to quirky for my taste. However, I guess I had to be in the right mood (i.e., sad and slightly depressed), because I found it totally stunning and beautiful this time around. It's rare to see a book that describes grief so well. The prose is totally stunning.

I don't know what to read next.

rfisher
07-28-2011, 12:13 AM
I recommend something that makes you laugh.

PRlady
07-28-2011, 12:28 AM
Well, I've had a lot of emotional support and cheerleading here while reading Possession. Thanks, Wyliefan and PRLady! :) That helped me get over the hump of the interminable dyspneic letters. It was a very well-written book but you have to like a bit of pain with your reading pleasure.

I actually have The Children's Book waiting. Would be nice to read it with an FSU buddy. :shuffle:

You are in LUCK. I don't check this thread as often as I should but I read it earlier this year. And found it un-put-down-able. I can't keep you company while you read it but I can :cheer2: you on. It's a bit slow in the first 50 pages. Keep going.

Now I'm the one looking. I just downloaded Jennifer Weiner's latest, she is my guilty pleasure, but I think that for chick lit she's on the literary side. Or so I tell myself.

I read The Help and State of Wonder this month, two lit-fics that lived up to their billing. Tremendously easy to read. And for IceAlisa, and anyone else who is either Russian or loves dance, you must get Russian Winter. A mystery wrapped up on Stalinist Russia and the Bolshoi.

So what should I read next? And could it please have some...sex...in it?

PrincessLeppard
07-28-2011, 01:14 AM
See the book Matry recommended. Your Scandalous Ways by Loretta Chase. I plan to hunt it down tomorrow.

IceAlisa
07-28-2011, 01:33 AM
You are in LUCK. I don't check this thread as often as I should but I read it earlier this year. And found it un-put-down-able. I can't keep you company while you read it but I can :cheer2: you on. It's a bit slow in the first 50 pages. Keep going. I will. I will. I may need some :cheer2:.


And for IceAlisa, and anyone else who is either Russian or loves dance, you must get Russian Winter. A mystery wrapped up on Stalinist Russia and the Bolshoi. Will check it out, thank you. Is it really "Russian", meaning lots of doom and gloom?


So what should I read next? And could it please have some...sex...in it? Jonathan Tropper's This Is Where I Leave You.

Prancer
07-28-2011, 03:14 AM
Meanwhile, I finished The Sky is Everywhere by Jandy Nelson. Wyliefan, if you're still looking for good YA reads, I totally recommend this one. This is the third time I had tried to start it, and the previous times I had difficulty getting into it, finding it a bit to quirky for my taste. However, I guess I had to be in the right mood (i.e., sad and slightly depressed), because I found it totally stunning and beautiful this time around. It's rare to see a book that describes grief so well. The prose is totally stunning.

Is that about a girl whose sister dies? She lives with her grandmother and uncle and they have a gardening business?

If so, ITA. But it's such a sad read.

rjblue
07-28-2011, 03:21 AM
Her PhD is in medieval lit, but she teaches classes in fantasy and science fiction--SF, as she always sternly reminds me, and never, ever sci-fi--and she reviews romance novels on the side. Her favorites on Goodreads are Harry Potter, Watership Down, and Georgette Heyer :lol:. Why can't I have friends like that? (SF- never, ever sci-fi :respec:)

I'm halfway through Connie Willis's To Say Nothing of the Dog (http://www.amazon.com/Say-Nothing-Dog-Connie-Willis/dp/0553575384). The Amazon editorial review describes it perfectly:
To Say Nothing of the Dog is a science-fiction fantasy in the guise of an old-fashioned Victorian novel, complete with epigraphs, brief outlines, and a rather ugly boxer in three-quarters profile at the start of each chapter. Or is it a Victorian novel in the guise of a time-traveling tale, or a highly comic romp, or a great, allusive literary game, complete with spry references to Dorothy L. Sayers, Wilkie Collins, and Arthur Conan Doyle? Its title is the subtitle of Jerome K. Jerome's singular, and hilarious, Three Men in a Boat (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ISBN=0140012133/$%7B0%7D).

I'm not finding it a page-turner, but I'm having great fun reading the epigraphs/outlines at the beginning of each chapter and then again after reading the chapter. Connie Willis is at her best when her stories are light-hearted and romance tinged, like this one.

Prancer
07-28-2011, 03:29 AM
Why can't I have friends like that? (SF- never, ever sci-fi :respec:)

We shared an office in grad school and I learned a whole new vocabulary. She was always heading off to cons where she would engage in filksinging and I got the SF lecture a few times.

I gave her Bimbos of the Death Sun (http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/bimbos-of-the-death-sun-sharyn-mccrumb/1000152051?ean=9780345483027&itm=1&usri=bimbos%2bof%2bthe%2bdeath%2bsun) and Zombies of the Gene Pool (http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/zombies-of-the-gene-pool-sharyn-mccrumb/1030758477?ean=9781436126328&itm=4&usri=bimbos%2bof%2bthe%2bdeath%2bsun) when she earned her MA in German, and she still counts that as the best graduation present she received for any of her degrees.:lol: I tried to read the first one and couldn't understand half of what was going on.

Do you read Lois McMaster Bujold? I think she's my friend's SF favorite.

rjblue
07-28-2011, 03:34 AM
Even non SF fans have enjoyed Cordelia's Honor (http://www.amazon.com/Cordelias-Honor-Vorkosigan-Saga-Omnibus/dp/0671578286) by Bujold when I've lent it to them. It's a lovely romance/adventure saga. I buy her books the day they are released.

eta- Here's a review (http://thebooksmugglers.com/2011/01/book-review-to-say-nothing-of-the-dog-by-connie-willis.html) that describes To Say Nothing of the Dog perfectly-

PRlady
07-28-2011, 12:57 PM
Will check it out, thank you. Is it really "Russian", meaning lots of doom and gloom?
Jonathan Tropper's This Is Where I Leave You.

It's got a fair amount of drama and the central character is....a ballerina for whom it's sometimes hard to feel empathy. I think it has a real Russian feel to it but what do I know. Oh, it also has a lot of fine jewelry in the plot. ;)

I'll look up the Tropper book. I read a sample of Matry's recommendation and realized I overdosed on romance before age 40. :o

oleada
07-28-2011, 09:21 PM
I recommend something that makes you laugh.

I have another Tropper, How to Talk to A Widower :D


Is that about a girl whose sister dies? She lives with her grandmother and uncle and they have a gardening business?

If so, ITA. But it's such a sad read.


Yes, that's the one.