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Grannyfan
07-20-2011, 02:14 PM
I finished One Day about a week ago. I loved it but I have to admit that I definitely saw the Thomas Hardy influence in the book. So I am looking for a book that is just a bit more happy and cheerful. I haven't had much success finding anything on my own. Anyone have any suggestions?

I recommend Major Pettigrew's Last Stand, about a very proper English gentleman who falls in love with a Pakistani woman or any of the Flavia DeLuce series, about a young English girl with a gift for chemistry and a knack for solving crimes.

modern_muslimah
07-20-2011, 05:33 PM
I recommend Major Pettigrew's Last Stand, about a very proper English gentleman who falls in love with a Pakistani woman or any of the Flavia DeLuce series, about a young English girl with a gift for chemistry and a knack for solving crimes.

Thanks for the suggestions! My local library has Major Pettigrew so I think I'm going to pick it up today. :)

Fergus
07-20-2011, 06:11 PM
So I've decided to put British historical fiction on the shelf and try something from sunny Italy! :summer:

Can anyone recommend a good Borgia-based historical fiction? Cheers & Thanks!!! :)

zaphyre14
07-20-2011, 07:19 PM
Roberta Gellis' "Lucretia Borgia and the Mother of Poisons" was pretty good.

Allen
07-20-2011, 07:26 PM
Can anyone recommend a good Borgia-based historical fiction? Cheers & Thanks!!! :)

Oliver loves historical fiction. He read Jeanne Kalogridis's The Borgia Bride and raved about it. I'm not a huge historical fiction fan, but I ended up reading it and liked it pretty well. I went on to read Sarah Bower's The Book of Love and liked it a lot.

I think Gregory McGuire's Mirror, Mirroris set in the Borgia court, but I haven't read it.

Artemis@BC
07-20-2011, 07:41 PM
I haven't read the book yet, but I was confused by the trailer when I saw it last night for the same reason. I had not been under the impression that the book was at all comic and the trailer does seem to be for a comedy.

I wonder if they tried to make the movie comic somehow, or if they are being intentionally misleading or what is going on there.

I've often found movie trailers highly misleading, or atypical of the overall theme of the film.

I can see how the film would have some comic moments -- there were some in the novel after all. But from the one trailer I've seen so far, I'm more concerned that it lookls like they've cleaned up the story somewhat.

But I'm keeping an open mind.

Michalle
07-20-2011, 07:42 PM
I'm pretty confident that it was someone here who recommended Elizabeth Bowen's Death of the Heart, but I'm too lazy to go back and find out who, so whoever you are (presumably you will remember!), thank you! I'm reading it right now, and it's amazing. I love her style of writing. I can't believe I'd never heard of her before.

Grannyfan
07-20-2011, 07:48 PM
I've often found movie trailers highly misleading, or atypical of the overall theme of the film.

I can see how the film would have some comic moments -- there were some in the novel after all. But from the one trailer I've seen so far, I'm more concerned that it lookls like they've cleaned up the story somewhat.

But I'm keeping an open mind.

Concerning the movie version of The Help, I watched a trailer online, and it seemed to give more of the flavor of the book than the one I saw on television.
Guess we'll just have to wait and see.

Grannyfan
07-20-2011, 07:53 PM
Thanks for the suggestions! My local library has Major Pettigrew so I think I'm going to pick it up today. :)

I hope you enjoy it as much as I did. The Flavia De Luce books are written by Alan Bradley:
The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie, A Red Herring Without Mustard, and The Weed That Strings the Hangman's Bag. There's a new one coming out in November.

Stefanie
07-20-2011, 08:00 PM
On the topic of books adapted into movies, I am anxiously waiting to see Snowflower and the Secret Fan. I was disappointed that it seems to have a limited release schedule. I was surprised to find out that Rupert Murdoch's wife, Wendi Deng, is the producer of this film (which prompted me to read up on her bio as I'd never heard of her before :shuffle:).

oleada
07-20-2011, 08:06 PM
I've been reading a lot since I have a broken laptop and no cable...Some books that have been mentioned in this thread....


Before I Go To Sleep

Read this one, and I hate to be the only one who didn't love it, but I didn't. :shuffle: I didn't hate it - I liked it well enough. I thought the build-up was great, and there were some things I really did not see coming (such as the lover pretending to be the husband, for one). But the resolution felt so terribly disappointing! I knew where they were going, and it just....felt like it flopped considering how good the buildup to the big reveal was.


The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks by E. Lockhart

Now, this one I loved. I just adored Frankie. She was awesome. I liked how she was smart enough to take charge of things and at the same time not realizing how her actions could be misinterpreted as bad. Just a fun read with a good message that's not overly heavy handed.

And I also read Then Came You by Jennifer Weiner. I don't normally read chick lit, so I hadn't read Weiner before, but the theme of the book sounded interesting. I don't think I'll read her again. It's not that it was bad, per se, but...:blah: I thought Bettina was really unlikable, the whole thing was completely implausible and not in a good way, and the characters just seemed cliched. However, I guess it did keep me entertained enough to read through it quickly and finish it!

I need more suggestions. I'm thinking of The Death of the Heart , which someone mentioned earlier. It sounds really interesting.

genevieve
07-20-2011, 08:12 PM
I agree that the trailer (at least the one I've seen) makes The Help look like a comedy, or something like Fried Green Tomatoes. I found the book riveting, so I'm definitely going to see it (esp because the team behind it is so closely associated with the author, so it should theoretically be close to her intention), but even Skeeter's hair in the film looks totally wrong :drama:

I found a copy of John Grisham's The Client in the free pile in my building yesterday. I read it in the mid-80s, and I think I saw the film. Is it wrong that I totally want to re-read it instead of John Henry Days? That's what summer is for, right? :P

Stefanie
07-20-2011, 08:21 PM
And I also read Then Came You by Jennifer Weiner. I don't normally read chick lit, so I hadn't read Weiner before, but the theme of the book sounded interesting. I don't think I'll read her again. It's not that it was bad, per se, but...:blah: I thought Bettina was really unlikable, the whole thing was completely implausible and not in a good way, and the characters just seemed cliched. However, I guess it did keep me entertained enough to read through it quickly and finish it!


Thanks for this review. I was debating about reading this when I'm finished my current book. I am looking for some "fluff" to read as I'm currently reading a memoir written by a priest who spent 25 years in Soviet prison and work camps during the 1940s-1960s. It's really engaging, but at the same time, it's made me sad and kind of depressed. It's a miracle he (and others) even made it out of there alive. And now I never want to waste a piece of food again. :shuffle:

Fergus
07-20-2011, 09:16 PM
Roberta Gellis' "Lucretia Borgia and the Mother of Poisons" was pretty good.


Oliver loves historical fiction. He read Jeanne Kalogridis's The Borgia Bride and raved about it. I'm not a huge historical fiction fan, but I ended up reading it and liked it pretty well. I went on to read Sarah Bower's The Book of Love and liked it a lot.

I think Gregory McGuire's Mirror, Mirroris set in the Borgia court, but I haven't read it.

Merci! :encore:

Artemis@BC
07-20-2011, 11:14 PM
The sequel, The Other Side of the Mountain, is also quite good.

Jean Craighead George's sequel was actually called On the Far Side of the Mountain.

There was a totally unrelated movie called The Other Side of the Mountain, about an injured skiier. It was based on a book called A Long Way Up by E.G. Valens.