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Buzz
07-04-2011, 06:07 PM
Hey I like Jane Austin. LOL :blocjudge

Prancer
07-04-2011, 10:08 PM
Oh yeah, and I take back what I said about the dictionary function not working with the Gutenberg e-books because it's working for me today. I guess it was just user error yesterday when I tried it out. It's certainly not the first time that I turned out to be the gadget with the problem.

It may not be your gadget, but something with the way the Gutenberg book was done. Gutenberg is a volunteer project and the quality of the electronic versions varies a great deal.

You will find, for example, that you can do more with some books than others. You can change font size in everything, but whether or not you can change fonts and backgrounds and all of that depends on the publisher.

OTOH, since your Simple Touch is brand new, it's likely there are some glitches; that's the problem with getting something first. B&N is pretty good about updating and will usually swap out a bad device without a demur.


Do I understand that the free or really cheap books are books I wouldn't read anyway? :lol: Jane Austin :yikes:

Oh, I wouldn't say that at all. Nearly all of my ebooks cost $5 or less, and most of them are current books, not classics. A lot of publishers offer freebies here and there to get people to read a series or to generate interest in a writer they think is undersold. And there are all kinds of cheap e-books, many of them offered to generate interest in a series or new author.

Generally, an e-book will run you about $2 less than whatever version is currently out--so new hardbacks run about $13 in e-book versions, large-size paperbacks are about $10, and standard paperbacks are about $5, although they often go as low as .99.

I have a hard time with the .99 books. I always figure "What the heck, it's only a dollar." Those dollars add up :shuffle:.

Spinner
07-05-2011, 03:49 AM
I have a hard time with the .99 books. I always figure "What the heck, it's only a dollar." Those dollars add up :shuffle:.
And aren't many of them really badly written/edited? I've chatted with a romance author on Twitter who sent me a PDF of her latest e-book coming out (her books are only available as e-books). I am so NOT a romance reader :scream:, but I told her I'd read hers. Thankfully it was very short (only 91 pages) because the story was total dreck and so badly edited (if at all, jaysus...) I about gouged my eyes out.

Prancer
07-05-2011, 03:58 AM
And aren't many of them really badly written/edited?

It usually depends on whether you buy a book that was published by a company or you buy a self-published book. Some of the self-published books are :yikes:, but some are quite good.

It always pays to read the reviews, because if the writing and editing is bad, there will be a string of people complaining about it. They also let you know if you are downloading an actual book or a short story--a lot of self-published authors misrepresent their work.

The book business is in a real wild west stage right now, and it's going to be even more interesting now that Amazon has started its own publishing house.

Lanie
07-05-2011, 04:20 AM
I just finished reading Sisterhood Everlasting, Ann Brashares' "adult" novel about the girls of the Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants series all grown up and on the verge of turning 30. The first third of the novel is so depressing that I actually had to put it down and stop reading for a day, but the rest, I read in one shot. Some definite "WTF???" moments and minor character inconsistencies, and some plot twists that will anger fans of the original YA series, but it's worth reading because when Brashares is at her best, she manages to capture tiny moments in beautiful pieces of writing.

I returned it. I was so infuriated because I was so "WTF?" at the characters and the plot and all the unrealistic crap when the first four were pretty good. I was so upset.

Southpaw
07-05-2011, 05:01 AM
Oh thank you my little Nook (aka Prancie) for giving me this beauty of a line earlier this afternoon from my darling dead white man Dostoevsky:

Today has been a day of folly, stupidity, and ineptness.

Indeed.

Spinner
07-05-2011, 05:10 AM
I returned it. I was so infuriated because I was so "WTF?" at the characters and the plot and all the unrealistic crap when the first four were pretty good. I was so upset.

I now know 4 people who've read it and all had the same reaction--becoming so upset at what she did to the characters. Word must be getting around becsause it's not selling at all in my bookstore.

Artemis@BC
07-05-2011, 07:31 PM
Anyone ever read Doris Lessing's The Golden Notebook (http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-golden-notebook-doris-lessing/1002941322?ean=9780060931407&itm=1&usri=the%2bgolden%2bnotebook)? I heard about it today and it sounds quite interesting.

I can't think about Lessing without having the Moxy Früvous song "My Baby Likes a Bunch of Authors" going through my head.

"Ondartje started a food fight,
salmon mousse all over the scene.
Spilled some dressing on Doris Lessing
these writer types are a scream!"

Lanie
07-05-2011, 07:35 PM
I now know 4 people who've read it and all had the same reaction--becoming so upset at what she did to the characters. Word must be getting around becsause it's not selling at all in my bookstore.

Aside from the one big spoiler, I was puzzled at little interaction, and the change of the characters' personalities, and the ending was totally bizarre.

Let's all live happily ever after on our Sisterhood commune farm! I also wanted to strangle Bridget and Carmen. Did they never learn anything? Anything at all? Just...WTF?! I think Lena was the only one who seemed, well, normal and her cavorting around the world was very strange as well. God, I'm so disappointed, I loved those books so much. I'm going to pretend this one doesn't exist.

Her book My Name is Memory was pretty good. The others I returned as they were fairly blah, I think. 3 Willows and The Last Summer of You and Me. Meh.

I am whoring this as a friend wrote it but Sarah Miller's The Lost Crown is fabulous. A young adult novel about Nicholas II's daughters Olga, Tatiana, Maria and Anastasia. She has done a fantastic job with so much research. It's so well-written, it doesn't read like a young adult book.

I'm excited for Philippa Gregory's book about Jacquetta of Luxembourg though I am incredibly irritated at all the "let's throw magic and witchraft in here!" crap she's been pulling, which strangely annoys me more than all the historical inaccuracies. :rofl:

oleada
07-06-2011, 03:02 AM
I went to B&N on a whim today (but forgot my Nook :wuzrobbed) and realized I'd never read The Giver. So I bought it and I loved it. Very quick read but it'll stay with me.

I also started paging through a Tropper book, Plan B, and was pretty much hooked so now I have to buy it, despite having a bunch of half started books on my Nook. I blame Prancer. :lol:



My quick review (http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/168470400) of SJ Watson's debut novel, Before I Go to Sleep (http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/before-i-go-to-sleep-s-j-watson/1100151937?ean=9780062060556&itm=1&usri=before%2bi%2bgo%2bto%2bsleep). :wideeyes: :eek: Heart raced at the end! A-MAZING!

Thanks for the review. It looks really interesting - I'm adding it to my list.

Prancer
07-06-2011, 03:06 AM
I blame Prancer. :lol:

I really ought to buy stock.

PrincessLeppard
07-06-2011, 03:06 AM
The Giver is an amazing book.

I'm reading "In the Garden of Beasts" by Erik Larson. (Larsen?) Super interesting, and they just got to Germany! The daughter is quite a woman. Carl Sandburg wrote her poetry and sent her locks of his hair. :lol:

oleada
07-06-2011, 03:09 AM
I really ought to buy stock.

He should hire you.

rfisher
07-06-2011, 03:25 AM
:lol: I bought another Tropper today. The local Borders has all of them! I'm having to order Before I go to sleep which is ruining my self-imposed two books/month purchase. :shuffle:

Nomad
07-06-2011, 05:00 AM
Isn't The Sheik considered the world's first romance novel? I'm very curious to hear how that turns out, and if there are phrases like "velvet steel."

I don't think I'd call it the first. Based on my own reading, I'd say that the romance novel has existed in one form or another since 1688, when Aphra Behn published Love Letters between a Nobleman and His Sister (sister-in-law in modern parlance, no actual incest). But The Sheik was a torrid romance for 1919. Snotty English bitch, indifferent to men in general, goes on a desert safari (and yet packs a jade silk evening gown). She's kidnapped by the Sheik, who rapes her repeatedly until she starts to like it. The horror! The shame! The thrill! I won't give away the ending, but yes, this book did help to establish a pattern for romance novels for decades afterwards. The racism, jingoism, and sexism are appalling, but in terms of camp, it can be be unintentionally funny.