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PrincessLeppard
06-30-2011, 05:04 AM
You don't need a tech expert with, you know, an actual book. :saint:

Prancer
06-30-2011, 05:08 AM
You don't need a tech expert with, you know, an actual book. :saint:

I didn't need one for an e-book, either.

I was there about Angry Birds. :D

zaphyre14
06-30-2011, 04:33 PM
I'm almost done with "The Lost Summer of Louisa May Alcott" by Kelly O'Connor McNees. The author is a self-confessed Alcott-adorer and tells the fictional tale of of doomed romance during the unaccounted-for time the family spent in Walpole, VT to escape their debts in Concord. It's an okay read but not something that endears me to Louisa - or her family. I think I stick with Louisa's own work.

Aimless
06-30-2011, 04:51 PM
A fellow prep-school graduate friend lent me Curtis Sittenfeld's Prep earlier in the year, and jeepers can that girl (yes, girl) write. She puts together a hell of a sentence, many of them in fact, and expresses the finest shades and degrees of emotional interactions in both interior monologue and dialogue. Devastating, sometimes funny, slow but rewarding. Dense, cumulative stuff about class, self-sabotage, the ruts we dig for ourselves, the value of friendship, the possibility of leaving things behind and making a fresh start... Handles plot and character development as well as she does her words.

So now I'm plowing through American Wife, Sittenfeld's novelization of Laura Bush's life and especially her marriage. She's able to portray an interior emotion state like no other writer. Draws events and her characters reactions to them with great precision. Maybe could have been edited down, but I don't know what I would have cut--each scene contributes to the whole, fully dimensioned portrait. I'm just half way through. Recommended.

Buzz
06-30-2011, 06:44 PM
I have ordered "Dragon Path" by Daniel Abraham from the library and hope they call soon. I am chewing my nails wait for a certain other book. In the meantime this seems like a good enough read. I checked it out first in the bookstore before heading for the library. LOL

galaxygirl
06-30-2011, 09:56 PM
And here I have been refraining from complaining about the hour and a half I spent in B&N today while they tried to figure out what was wrong with my Nook Color. And I haven't said one word about how annoying it is when I know more about how the thing works than the "tech expert" they sent me to, who had to call 1-800-THE-BOOK and talk to someone else who didn't seem to know much either.

I've borrowed my mom's Nook Color for the week to see if I like it. I really prefer paper books but I like that I can have more than one book at a time with the Nook and I also really like the fact that you can take notes and look up words in the dictionary on the Nook. But, the Nook Color is too big and heavy for the way I read (unless I adjust, of course) so I was thinking about the new b&w Nook (which looks like it was made for kids and/or seniors that are technologically illiterate, but I digress...) even though it's in black and white and I can't read FSU on it. :shuffle: Then I discovered that I can get the regular Nook for free using my credit cards award points! This weekend I'm going shopping for Nook covers. :)

Kasey
06-30-2011, 10:19 PM
I'm looking for medical mystery authors. Any suggestions?

Thanks

Michael Palmer, although he dwells more towards thriller/mystery as well. But all are medically inclined.

dramagrrl
06-30-2011, 10:57 PM
A fellow prep-school graduate friend lent me Curtis Sittenfeld's Prep earlier in the year, and jeepers can that girl (yes, girl) write. She puts together a hell of a sentence, many of them in fact, and expresses the finest shades and degrees of emotional interactions in both interior monologue and dialogue. Devastating, sometimes funny, slow but rewarding. Dense, cumulative stuff about class, self-sabotage, the ruts we dig for ourselves, the value of friendship, the possibility of leaving things behind and making a fresh start... Handles plot and character development as well as she does her words.
I hated Prep with a passion. I found it both incredibly pretentious and mind-bogglingly slow, and the main character was one of the most unlikeable characters I've ever encountered in fiction. I have significant experience being part of the prep school world, and while some things in the story did ring true to me, a lot of it seemed ridiculously exaggerated.

rfisher
07-01-2011, 03:51 AM
I just finished Alexander McCall's The Saturday Big Tent Wedding. It's his latest installment in the No.1 Ladies Detective series. I'm wondering if this will be the last since he finally let Mma Makutsi get married. I hope not because I love this series. And if anybody likes audio books, I strongly suggest listening to these books. The narrator has this wonderful Botswana accent and is a pleasure to listen to. Gentle humor, human nature and a reflection of McCall's love for Botswana.

Oddly, I don't particularly like his Ladies Philosophy Club books set in Scotland. Sort of like how I love MC Beaton's Hamish Macbeth series but don't like her Agatha Raisin.

Nomad
07-02-2011, 04:19 PM
Finished William this morning. It was an immensely satisfying novel. E. H. Young did an admirable job carrying off a family drama which could have easily turned into a melodrama; she didn't moralise, as narrator or through her characters; she resisted any temptation to demonize the mother or sanctify the father; at no point did I feel that a character or situation was unbelievable; an excellent novel all around. Plot, characterization, style: Young ticked all the boxes.

Moving on to another Virago Modern Classic, The Willow Cabin by Pamela Frankau. Adulterous love triangle with a theatrical backdrop.

Jenya
07-02-2011, 06:11 PM
I just picked up some books from the library and when I went to start reading one, I was not very happy to find that someone who read it previously had made "corrections" in pencil throughout the whole thing. I use the term corrections lightly, because most of these comments and changes make absolutely no grammatical sense. :lol: But still, how annoying.

TygerLily
07-02-2011, 06:13 PM
Yeah, that's the only thing worse than the actual errors in the text. :shuffle:

Aimless
07-02-2011, 06:22 PM
I hated Prep with a passion. I found it both incredibly pretentious and mind-bogglingly slow, and the main character was one of the most unlikeable characters I've ever encountered in fiction. I have significant experience being part of the prep school world, and while some things in the story did ring true to me, a lot of it seemed ridiculously exaggerated.

I don't especially disagree. She was very unlikable, but for that often very lifelike. Prep felt distinctly like a word for word memoir. Not uncommonly in high school and especially in the insular world of prep, we get typecast early on, and our own behavior, self-perception, and the expectations of others conspire to keep us in that one role. My prep school experience didn't have the sharp consciousness of class that hers did, partly because of who I am (I seem to straddle every class) but more because the school I attended was deliberately egalitarian: more than half of us on scholarship and a requirement to work an hour a day in the kitchen or cleaning hallways, etc.

If she's the most unlikeable character for you, you must not have read Ian McEwan's "Solar".

Matryeshka
07-02-2011, 06:45 PM
I just finished Alexander McCall's The Saturday Big Tent Wedding. It's his latest installment in the No.1 Ladies Detective series. I'm wondering if this will be the last since he finally let Mma Makutsi get married. I hope not because I love this series. And if anybody likes audio books, I strongly suggest listening to these books. The narrator has this wonderful Botswana accent and is a pleasure to listen to. Gentle humor, human nature and a reflection of McCall's love for Botswana.

Oddly, I don't particularly like his Ladies Philosophy Club books set in Scotland. Sort of like how I love MC Beaton's Hamish Macbeth series but don't like her Agatha Raisin.

You need to have a book talk with my mom--she has the exact same opnions on both Alexander McCall and MC Beaton.

I lurrrve Precious and co., and it's a nice respite from mysteries that try to be overly cutesy or overly grim just for the sake of being cutesy and grim. What I love about that series is that I really want to imagine that really IS Botswana and those people DO exist. While I read many, many, many books I like, there are very few that give the same sense of peace and all-is-right feeling. You just feel good reading them.

Prancer
07-02-2011, 08:35 PM
I'm reading Lost and Found in Russia: Lives in the Post-Soviet Landscape (http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/lost-and-found-in-russia-susan-richards/1021927461?ean=9781590513484&itm=1&usri=lost%2band%2bfound%2bin%2brussia%2blives%2bin %2bthe%2bpost%2bsoviet), which is a very interesting account written by an American woman who visited off-the-beaten-path Russia between the early nineties to 2008 or so and chronicled what happened to the people after the fall of the Soviet government.

My favorite part so far is from the prologue, where she says that she knows enough about the Russian culture to know that everyone she writes about will tell her that she got them all wrong :lol:.