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agalisgv
06-01-2011, 06:01 PM
http://nymag.com/print/?/health/features/aids-cure-2011-6/

It appears a cure for HIV has been found. A man diagnosed with HIV in 1995 now has no traces of the disease after undergoing stem cell treatment.

IceJunkie
06-01-2011, 06:20 PM
This has been news for awhile, but unfortunately it is only a "cure" for an incredibly select few people. The donor was one of a minute group of people who have genetic resistance to the HIV virus. When his stem cells were harvested and put into Brown, he was able to use the donor's immunity to stop his body from reproducing the HIV virus.

It is a huge step forward, but it is a a very risky procedure, given that you are incredibly immuno-compromised when undergoing stem cell transplants, on top of being HIV+.

And unfortunately, its very very expensive, and right now, globally, the poorest are more often that not those stricken with the disease.

*Jen*
06-01-2011, 09:17 PM
It's still a step in the right direction though. I think it's a good argument for stem cell research, although I know it's an ethically debatable area. I'm glad they've made a step forward at least.

IceAlisa
06-01-2011, 09:42 PM
It seems that it worked in one very specific case. I wouldn't go as far as calling it a cure in a thread title.

agalisgv
06-01-2011, 10:21 PM
The next steps to make it more widely available:
A stem-cell transplant from an unrelated donor can cost $250,000 and is a reasonable risk only in the face of imminent death. What cured Timothy Brown is obviously not a cure for the rest of the world. But it is proof of concept, and it has jolted AIDS-cure research back to life. Sometimes science follows sentiment; the abandonment of cure research after the disillusion of the nineties is now playing out in reverse.

For Brown’s cure to be relevant on a wide scale, it would have to be possible to create the delta 32 mutation without a donor and without a transplant—preferably in the form of a single injection. As it happens, progress toward that goal has already begun, in the laboratory of Paula Cannon at the University of Southern California. Instead of a donor, Cannon is using a new form of gene editing known as zinc finger nucleases, developed by the California company Sangamo BioSciences. Zinc finger nucleases are synthetic proteins that act as genetic scissors. They can target and snip a specific part of the genetic blueprint: They can, for instance, cut out the code that produces the CCR5 receptor, yielding a cell with HIV resistance.

IceAlisa
06-02-2011, 12:55 AM
What cured Timothy Brown is obviously not a cure for the rest of the world. But it is proof of concept, and it has jolted AIDS-cure research back to life.

Obviously, this is great. A great start that is, not the finish line.

Dr.Siouxs
06-02-2011, 01:33 AM
It seems that it worked in one very specific case. I wouldn't go as far as calling it a cure in a thread title.

Eys, I got more excited than I should have. :fragile: Can we change the title?

Cyn
06-02-2011, 02:39 AM
I just hope that this can serve the anti-stem cell people a nice hot cup of STFU.

TygerLily
06-02-2011, 02:41 AM
It seems that it worked in one very specific case. I wouldn't go as far as calling it a cure in a thread title.Yeah, I had emotional whiplash between the first and second posts.

Lara
06-02-2011, 02:42 AM
I just hope that this can serve the anti-stem cell people a nice hot cup of STFU.

ITA.

IceAlisa
06-02-2011, 05:16 AM
I just hope that this can serve the anti-stem cell people a nice hot cup of STFU.

:lol: Me too.

mon125
06-02-2011, 05:42 PM
The cure of the man diagnosed in 1995 represents a proof of principle, that HIV can be cure and therefore not only gives hope to a lot of people but have open the door for researching and investing in this area.

There are at the moment several protocols being tried not just only the one posted by agalisv. Some of them are focusing on waking up the CD4 T cells that are in special reservoirs in the body and that contain the virus so they can be targeted with anti-HIV drugs. They are using already approved FDA-drugs and they are hoping to get these new therapies to be out to the public in not much time, if there are shown to be helpful in reducing the pool of dormant T cells and latent virus.

If you want more information, there was an excellent News Focus on Science magazine a couple of week ago and it was written in a very accessible way and although is not open access, you may be able to get it through a friend or a library?
http://www.sciencemag.org/content/332/6031/784.summary
Also, at the Science site you can find related information on their ScienceNow section which I think is open access...

Sadly, I do not think that this specific cure has much to do with the controversy with embryonic stem-cell therapy as we are talking about adult bone marrow stem cells.

Gazpacho
06-02-2011, 10:57 PM
I'm wondering, since HIV is a virus, has the virus mutated or will it mutate to nullify this "cure"?

Anita18
06-05-2011, 01:32 AM
I'm wondering, since HIV is a virus, has the virus mutated or will it mutate to nullify this "cure"?
It most certainly can. It's a danger for many vaccines and treatments, obviously.

DaveRocks
06-05-2011, 01:55 AM
Can a mod PLEASE change the thread title. Wowsers. Perhaps something like: "A step toward an HIV cure."