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Aceon6
05-27-2011, 05:57 PM
I imagine that the children's parents are aware of these theories and hence, let their children "pick" which ever gender they want. Personally, I feel like the parents are using their children as political statements. I understand fighting gender norms and stereotypes but I somehow feel this is going beyond that.

This ^! There are many other ways of doing this beyond letting people guess about the child's biological sex. I know many parents who are very proactive about exposing their pre-K children to activities that are culturally viewed as more appropriate for a boy or a girl and letting them explore the possibilities. We may even have a budding chef or designer in our family due to my middle nephew's fondness for his mother's EZBake oven and her pretend sewing machine.

susan6
05-27-2011, 07:40 PM
And the leader of the Giro d'Itlalia wears the coveted "pink" jersey (http://cache.boston.com/multimedia/sports/bigshots/giro/bs27.jpg), even for time trials when they're in more aerodynamic kits. (http://cache.boston.com/multimedia/sports/bigshots/giro/bs18.jpg)

I miss the T-Mobile team. Magenta is a good color to wear to stand out of the pack.

http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/photos/more-speculation-about-t-mobile-change/34976

PeterG
06-09-2011, 07:22 PM
Parents of ‘genderless’ Toronto baby surface to talk about unwanted media attention
(http://ca.news.yahoo.com/blogs/dailybrew/parents-genderless-toronto-baby-surface-talk-unwanted-media-173022122.html)

This article includes a link to their (one?) interview. It's with CBC radio.

Select quotes from the yahoo article:


"The fact that the story has gone viral, and is now across the world, is also a tremendous shock to my system," said Storm's mother. "This wouldn't be my chosen venue for having these discussions."


Yet, despite the regrets, Witterick admitted on the CBC that she would consent to the initial coverage all over again.

"I do think my children have seen their parents stand up," she said, "and speak up when it's important."

overedge
06-09-2011, 07:39 PM
From the Yahoo article:

"Because the more that we try and prioritize our family, and step back from the media," Witterick explained to "Q" host Jian Ghomeshi, "the more the media seems to be creating a story that doesn't really exist."

Oh FFS. If the story "didn't really exist" then why do they think the Toronto Star was interested in them in the first place? And if they're so upset now about "media attention", why did they agree to the initial story? If they honestly believed that the story would have just run in the Toronto Star and no one would have noticed or followed up, they are hopelessly naive or deeply stupid.

IceAlisa
06-09-2011, 08:12 PM
Cry me a river.

Southpaw
06-09-2011, 08:18 PM
That's what they get for letting their kid play in a homemade half-assed hot air balloon.

Oh, wait. Wrong media whore family.

FigureSpins
06-09-2011, 08:43 PM
Sounds like a psychology experiment, using real kids. Meh, kids are resilient and this isn't the worst thing that could happen. The dinner table conversation could be really interesting: "What did you do today, Storm?" "I tricked Mrs. Magillicutty in thinking that I was a girl. Tomorrow, I'll ask if I can bring in a football and really throw her for a loop." If s/he were in my family, some cousin or another would mock the parents for their experiment, lol.

The more difficult part for strangers is not being able to use gender-based pronouns: him/her, his/hers, he/she. They'll have to say "Where is STORM'S pacifier?" "Does your CHILD want to share the sandbox with Mary?" "STORM'S grade on the math test wasn't good - did HE OR SHE study?" "They need to tie their shoelace." It's just awkward and uncomfortable. I have had skaters in group lessons with androgynous names and appearance. It's a little distracting if you have to talk to the parents since you can't use he/she/him/her/etc. It's easier to do in writing than in speech.

When Storm chooses a pink shirt for him/herself one day, someone will call him/her a little girl and I'd like to see the parents' response. I hope they won't be angry at someone for jumping to a conclusion. However, I think they might give a mini-lecture. If Storm is old enough, he/she might spill the beans and shut down the experiment.


To me, the name "Storm" is masculine because Dr. Frank Field, a well-known local meteorologist, named his son "Storm Field." Dad and son were both weather reporters in NYC when I was growing up. If I met the kid from the article, I'd assume it was a boy!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Field_(meteorologist)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Storm_Field

Full disclosure: I wouldn't let my daughters join football, wrestling or hockey, mainly because they fight enough out of the arena, not because of gender issues.

IceAlisa
06-09-2011, 08:46 PM
The kid kinda looks like a boy too.

Jenny
06-09-2011, 09:21 PM
To me, the name "Storm" is masculine because Dr. Frank Field, a well-known local meteorologist, named his son "Storm Field." Dad and son were both weather reporters in NYC when I was growing up. If I met the kid from the article, I'd assume it was a boy!

And then there's Storm Large, (http://stormlarge.com/) who is definitely a girl. :)

PeterG
06-09-2011, 09:39 PM
Oh FFS. If the story "didn't really exist" then why do they think the Toronto Star was interested in them in the first place?

All kinds of stories appear in newspapers and don't end up becoming a worldwide story. The fact that this situation has been blown so out of proportion shows the validity of their point. That the issue of gender-identity is so ingrained in people that they can't let it go. We have work to do as a society. :)


And if they're so upset now about "media attention", why did they agree to the initial story?

Because they thought the change it could bring about would create a better world for their children, as well as hundreds of thousands other children?

skatesindreams
06-09-2011, 09:53 PM
How could have they believed that the story/their choices wouldn't have elicited a reaction?

Gazpacho
06-09-2011, 10:12 PM
The thread on the "sissy boy" experiment reminded me of this one. The key difference is forcing a gender viewpoint--that viewpoint can be "genderless"--on a kid versus trying to raise them to not think that their biological sex limits what they can do, how they can dress, what they can like, etc.

I'd like to know how the parents would react if the child were to identify with a gender and display gender-consistent stereotypes. If Storm tells someone, "I'm a girl", will the parents be okay, or will they be like, "Storm, you are not a girl. You are not a boy. You do not have a gender and I'm very angry when you say you're a girl"? If Storm is biologically male and plays with trucks, will the parents be okay, or will they force him to put away his trucks because it's consistent with the gender stereotype?

I'll withhold judgment until then.

IceAlisa
06-09-2011, 10:26 PM
^^^Those are very interesting questions, Gazpacho.

PeterG
06-10-2011, 12:33 AM
I'd like to know how the parents would react if the child were to identify with a gender and display gender-consistent stereotypes. If Storm tells someone, "I'm a girl", will the parents be okay, or will they be like, "Storm, you are not a girl. You are not a boy. You do not have a gender and I'm very angry when you say you're a girl"? If Storm is biologically male and plays with trucks, will the parents be okay, or will they force him to put away his trucks because it's consistent with the gender stereotype?

I'll withhold judgment until then.

Gosh, how heavy is that gavel?? :huh:

And how about we stick to the facts instead of imagining up a truckload of "maybe's" and "what-if's" in regards to what the parents might do at some point?

IceAlisa
06-10-2011, 01:06 AM
C'mon. Speculations'R'Us here at FSU, innit?