PDA

View Full Version : The coolest marriage proposal I've ever seen!



Pages : 1 [2] 3

genevieve
05-18-2011, 05:22 PM
I'm also not a fan of public proposals in general, but I thought this was sweet. Having the sekret camera recording her reaction as she immediately recognizes the voices was pretty funny.

I do wish it had been just a regular audience though instead of all those friends. It looked like there were at least a couple of people in the background who were NOT part of the couple's circle (there's a guy with a total WTH :confused: expression in the background at one point :P ), but I had to wonder why she didn't think something was up when everyone she knows just happened to go to the same movie.

In February, there was a mixed-artist dance concert over Valentine's Day weekend, and on the last night, a dancer/choreographer proposed to her boyfriend as part of her performance. Again - not a fan of public proposals in general, but apparently it was a big hit (I missed the show unfortunately).

pollyanna
05-18-2011, 05:25 PM
Not a fan of public proposals either because what if she wants to say No? but

PML! that he stopped at the snack bar on the way in.

Zemgirl
05-18-2011, 05:39 PM
I hate public proposals. Hate them, hate them, HATE THEM. It becomes more about "look at this huge gesture I made. Look at me proposing to you. Aren't I a great, fabulous, romantic guy? I'll bet every girl wishes it was them instead of you." It puts you on the spot, everyone is looking at you, and it's not a special moment between two people, it's well...a youtube video. :rolleyes:

Save your grand gestures for bad romantic comedies. If I ever get proposed to, it better be private and meaningful for the two of us, not us and fifty of our friends, family, and others. A Grand Gesture to me says: generic, attention-seeking, insecure about my answer so making a public declaration will ensure you say yes because only a heartless beyotch would say no.
Oh, absolutely. If I were to find the right guy, I really hope he'll know that I'm the last person who would want such a thing! It's wonderful to be able to celebrate with loved ones - but like you, I'd want the proposal itself to be private and meaningful. Also, public proposals require a lot of work and often this means that the person being proposed to is the last to know about it; personally, I just don't get the appeal of this.

But I can see how for some couples a public proposal can be just the thing for their personalities and relationship. To each their own :)

Garden Kitty
05-18-2011, 06:48 PM
Add me to the list of people who don't like public proposals. I prefer to think of it as a private moment between two people and not a show for everyone you know.

Andora
05-18-2011, 07:13 PM
I don't mind public proposals. The upside to them is, even if the couple have talked marriage before and she's somewhat expecting one, she'll still be surprised. But it has to be something that both parties are into. I have a friend who really wanted a public proposal, but her boyfriend was intensely private and would have been so uncomfortable. She said, "so what? It's about me." :lol: Surprisingly, they're not together anymore...

I thought the video was sweet, and I admit to tearing up. Music totally plays my emotions like a banjo. It's ridiculous.

WindSpirit
05-18-2011, 09:04 PM
I do wish it had been just a regular audience though instead of all those friends. There you go: http://youtu.be/38GZtp333GY The link was in the comments to the one this thread's about.

I'm a private person, but I don't know how I would feel about a proposal like this. I love movies, and he would score a lot of points for originality (well, not anymore :lol:) and effort, so maybe I wouldn't mind this one so much. That is, IF we had talked marriage before and I would have already told him I wasn't against the idea.

Any other public proposal (not at the movies) sounds dreadful. The one at the mall, brrr. :scream:

I agree with what other people said that the person asking better makes SURE of the feelings of the person they're going to be asking. With the guy at the mall, it looked like he put the girl on the spot or maybe even was trying to put pressure on her to get married, or at the very least they had never talked about it or if they did she said she wasn't sure.

rjblue
05-18-2011, 11:58 PM
I don't mind public proposals. The upside to them is, even if the couple have talked marriage before and she's somewhat expecting one, she'll still be surprised.
I go even further than most people. I wouldn't marry a man where there was a "proposal" event. If I were seriously dating someone, marriage would have to be a much discussed, mutual decision. And after 29 years of marriage, I still don't have or want an engagment ring.

Japanfan
05-19-2011, 02:09 AM
I don't care for public proposals either and would find this extremely embarrassing. Also, I don't care for the traditional notion of having to ask the girl's dad for permission. I can make my own mind up as an adult, thank you very much.

One of my favourite proposal stories was about a man who took his girlfriend up in a hot air balloon to propose. That would be more my style.

Angelskates
05-19-2011, 03:10 AM
I don't care for public proposals either and would find this extremely embarrassing. Also, I don't care for the traditional notion of having to ask the girl's dad for permission. I can make my own mind up as an adult, thank you very much.

One of my favourite proposal stories was about a man who took his girlfriend up in a hot air balloon to propose. That would be more my style.

I totally agree. I'm a private romantic, to me a romantic proposal is one that is between me and my partner only. I'm much more like rjblue, no need for an engagement ring, I'd prefer a discussion and natural progression rather than a big event.

Norlite
05-19-2011, 03:18 AM
Is a proposal ever a surprise anyway? Or the man (usually although nothing rong with a woman doing the asking imo) unsure of the answer? I think most couples who decide to get married have discussed it many times and come to a mutual agreement.

I consider something like this just a romantic gesture. I thought it was sweet.

OliviaPug
05-19-2011, 03:21 AM
No public proposals for me either. I kind of like what the fiance (Lon / James Marsden) did in the movie "The Notebook." He proposed privately to Allie (Rachel McAdams), but then did a silly, spontaneous (that's the key) announcement from the stage that "This woman is gonna marry me!" (paraphrasing)

Too much planning can kind of ruin the event ... for me. Some women probably like all the planning and the fuss though.

I'm much more touched when my husband says something spontaneous and sweet to me in front of friends/strangers. Last week we were out to dinner and he asked one of our friends, "Isn't my wife beautiful?"

Now that's my kind of romance! But, of course, I *did* marry the guy, so stands to reason I like his style. Maybe the fiance in the video likes the very planned, public proposal? Different strokes ...

O-

OliviaPug
05-19-2011, 03:22 AM
Is a proposal ever a surprise anyway? Or the man (usually although nothing rong with a woman doing the asking imo) unsure of the answer? I think most couples who decide to get married have discussed it many times and come to a mutual agreement.

I consider something like this just a romantic gesture. I thought it was sweet.

I think you're right that most do discuss and decide. I, OTOH, had no idea. I didn't really want to get married or care about it. We never talked about it. Meanwhile, going on 17th year ...

O-

Andora
05-19-2011, 06:17 AM
I don't care for public proposals either and would find this extremely embarrassing. Also, I don't care for the traditional notion of having to ask the girl's dad for permission. I can make my own mind up as an adult, thank you very much.


Yeah, the whole asking the father thing really bugs me, too. And even the "giving away" notion at the actual wedding. My father would walk me down the aisle because I think it would be a special moment for us, considering he's really not a part of general wedding plans. But there will be no, "who gives this bride away" b.s.

A few friend insists asking the father for his daughter's hand is a special tradition and considered respectful. I just don't engage her as she's lost her father, so these things are amplified for her. But do people really put so much stock in this tradition?

Japanfan
05-19-2011, 09:01 AM
Yeah, the whole asking the father thing really bugs me, too. And even the "giving away" notion at the actual wedding. My father would walk me down the aisle because I think it would be a special moment for us, considering he's really not a part of general wedding plans. But there will be no, "who gives this bride away" b.s.


But if he walks you down the aisle, won't he be giving you away, at least symbolically?

I get the tradition and understand that it is a special moment for a dad to walk his daughter down the aisle. But the deeper meaning of that (woman as possession) bothers me. And the fact that I didn't have warm and fuzzy relationship with my dad probably helped me to avoid that tradition.

The deeper meaning of the traditional marriage ceremony bothers me
as well. I didn't have a traditional marriage and it's amazing that I actually got married twice - as I don't think I really believe it. What I like about it is that is a cause for celebration.



A few friend insists asking the father for his daughter's hand is a special tradition and considered respectful. I just don't engage her as she's lost her father, so these things are amplified for her. But do people really put so much stock in this tradition?

I think people do. And I think that its implications may continue to impact women's status today, even though for most of us it is largely a symbolic practice.

danceronice
05-19-2011, 02:57 PM
I on the other hand would be perfectly happy to use the old-form Anglican vows. If I'm agreeing to marry someone he's someone I'm perfectly happy to have in charge. Don't know about asking my father. "Blessing" would just sound wrong, and it's not like he'd say no as far as permission goes. Though he'd probably want to know the guy's financial situation.

Public proposal--oddly, I'd be MORE comfortable in front of strangers than family and it would have to be a particular subset of my friends. But I love being the center of attention. The bigger the audience, the better. Heck, to me things like jumbotron proposals are too impersonal.