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Angelskates
04-30-2011, 09:32 AM
I have decided to change my diet to vegetarian again, specifically lacto-ovo vegetarian, no meat or fish, but still eggs and dairy.

I was vegetarian for more than 10 years and then began eating meat again several years ago. I have severe iron deficiency anaemia that both taking iron tablets and/or eating meat hasn't conquered.

I am looking for advice on how best to make the switch. I don't eat a huge amount of meat anyway (no pork, chicken maximum once a week, red meat mostly only when I eat out etc.) but should I take it away gradually?

I don't eat tofu because I don't like the texture, but I enjoy fruit and veggies a lot and don't have any trouble with a vegetarian diet, except the lack of iron. Any advice on how to best get protein? I had a dietician/nutritionist but she has since left Beijing and I don't want to pay for another one and have to start again with history etc. etc.

I know there are several vegetarians on the board, and I am looking more for what to expect when I make the change. Are there any side effects? I had pretty major side effects when I started eating meat, and am hoping there aren't too many when I change back again!

Any good recipes would be greatly appreciated too. :)

Sorry, I didn't mean to post this in SS, can a nice mod please move to OTBT! Thanks.

Jackie Sparrow
04-30-2011, 11:44 AM
I stopped eating animals in 2001 and I didn't transition, I just stopped completely from one day to the next. I remember at the beginning I ate a lot of eggs and cheese and I had high cholesterol for a while. But from stopping eating animals I didn't have any side effects at all.

I am not of great help to you cause I don't have any deficiencies and I don't pay much attention to what I eat. I sometimes crave something; i.e. my body tells me what I need to eat.

Good luck with the restart. I hope you find a solution to your iron problem. I am glad meat doesn't solve it :P

KikiSashaFan
04-30-2011, 02:18 PM
I haven't eaten meat since I was 8, but I do eat eggs and dairy still.

I'm not a huge fan of tofu either, although it is okay to bulk up a smoothie since you lose the texture when it's blended. There are some other soy products that are delicious though. Last night I made hamburger helper with soy hamburger and even Mr. Kiki ate it without complaint. I've found most soy products are very good, especially if you put a sauce or marinade on them. If you're not allergic to nuts there are also a lot of nut based meat substitutes, cheeses and such that contain high amounts of protein. I also eat Greek yogurt over the regular stuff, as it has 3-4 times the amount of protein.

When I first went vegetarian my mom took me to a bunch of dieticians and such to make sure I was still gettting all the nutrients I needed, and the one thing they all said in common was that you can get most things from soy, nuts, dairy, eggs etc, but you should still take a B12 supplement because that's harder to come by without meat.

Angelskates
04-30-2011, 02:28 PM
KikiSashaFan, I actually hate soy :lol: (unless it's just soy sauce) and am not usually a fan of meat substitutes either...I love Greek yoghurt though, I had no idea it was high in protein.

Karina1974
04-30-2011, 02:35 PM
^^^No, most soy products are "not good", especially for your health. I think anyone who make soy part of their children's diet ought to be charged with child abuse.

http://www.stumbleupon.com/su/2BpRoa/www.foodrenegade.com/dangers-of-soy/


Soy, as most Americans eat it, is not a health food....

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Angelskates
04-30-2011, 02:49 PM
^^^No, most soy products are "not good", especially for your health. I think anyone who make soy part of their children's diet ought to be charged with child abuse.

http://www.stumbleupon.com/su/2BpRoa/www.foodrenegade.com/dangers-of-soy/

:rolleyes: Eating too much of anything is bad for you. I've had a dietician or nutritionist for the majority of my life and all agree that soy is very good for you in small doses, like any other food. My doctors agree.

And BTW, I'm not American and I live in Beijing, so the soy I would be eating, if I liked it, would be Chinese.

JerseySlore
04-30-2011, 03:19 PM
I'm no vegetarian, but I don't like meat in general so I tend to rely on nuts, cottage cheese, whey protein and eggs for protein. I think it's important to make sure at least some of your protein intake comes from a source other than grain.

I know China, well actually most countries outside North America can be unaccomodating to vegetarians, so you should be prepared to forego restaurant foods!

milanessa
04-30-2011, 03:44 PM
I can't help you from personal experience but there might be some info you can use here:

http://www.vrg.org/nutrition/iron.htm

michiruwater
04-30-2011, 03:50 PM
Whole wheat pasta and breads tend to have a fair amount of protein (5-6grams for 1 slice of bread made from only whole wheat flour), so that is where i get most of mine. My vegetarian cookbook lists these items as high in protein:

Eggs
Cheddar (and other cheeses)
tempeh
lentils
ricotta and cottage cheese
sesame seeds, sunflower seeds
split green peas, kidney beans, chickpeas, limabeans
peanuts, cashews
Spinach
barley or bulgur
peas (:cheer:)
Whole-wheat bread and pasta (and brown rice)
Yogurt, particularly Greek
And some fruits and vegetables but it doesn't specify.

PrincessLeppard
04-30-2011, 04:13 PM
I'm no vegetarian, but I don't like meat in general so I tend to rely on nuts, cottage cheese, whey protein and eggs for protein. I think it's important to make sure at least some of your protein intake comes from a source other than grain.

I know China, well actually most countries outside North America can be unaccomodating to vegetarians, so you should be prepared to forego restaurant foods!

I taught in China, and had no trouble at all eating vegetarian while I was there. In fact, I learned to appreciate brussel sprouts and collard greens. :)

Angel, I just went cold turkey (so to speak...) when I went vegetarian. I'm don't really watch what I eat, so I should probably check that I'm getting enough iron. :shuffle:

michiruwater
04-30-2011, 04:26 PM
Collard green :swoon:

brussel sprouts :yikes:

KikiSashaFan
04-30-2011, 04:28 PM
:rolleyes: Eating too much of anything is bad for you. I've had a dietician or nutritionist for the majority of my life and all agree that soy is very good for you in small doses, like any other food. My doctors agree.

Exactly. I eat soy stuff maybe twice a week at most, usually when I'm making a recipe that contains meat and need a substitute. It can't be worse for you than meat pumped full of hormones and steroids.

I'm not sure if you can find it where you are, but quinoa is a sprouted grain and an excellent source of protein.

JerseySlore
04-30-2011, 04:41 PM
I taught in China, and had no trouble at all eating vegetarian while I was there. In fact, I learned to appreciate brussel sprouts and collard greens. :)

Angel, I just went cold turkey (so to speak...) when I went vegetarian. I'm don't really watch what I eat, so I should probably check that I'm getting enough iron. :shuffle:

I love brussel sprouts. :swoon:
I know there are plenty of veggie main dishes in China, but you have to watch out for certain types of broth and condiments many of which contain animal-based ingredients. My vegetarian friend once requested a vegetarian noodle soup in Korea, and they just picked out meats from the beef broth. :scream:
Surprisingly many people fail to understand vegetarianism extends beyond not chewing flesh.

PrincessLeppard
04-30-2011, 05:46 PM
I realize that. I am not one of those people.

JerseySlore
04-30-2011, 06:14 PM
I wasn't referring to you. ;)
I just have seen so many restaurants employ "pick out the bacon bits and make your own vegetarian dish" attitude. My poor friend depended on white rice and soy sauce until she discovered bibimbap.