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mkats
05-13-2011, 04:27 AM
My dad used to call my uncle, who was 9 when he and my mother met, "xiao bao" which in Chinese means little precious one. Unfortunately, he STILL calls him this - said uncle is now in his thirties and did not appreciate it when my baby sister, who was struggling with Chinese, started calling him "xiao biao" (little clock).

Different aunt and uncle have two kids, whom my grandfather insisted on naming. He came up with lovely traditional Chinese names, but the parents wanted them to have easily pronounceable English names. :shuffle: So the kids were named Alex and Emily and the grandfather was never told, and when they go back to China to visit they just have to remember that their names have suddenly changed. :lol:

mkats
05-13-2011, 04:29 AM
I really just have a hard time with the Kristin/Kirstin/Kerstin/Kirsten...the subtle vowel differences are too hard to remember :yikes:

How do you pronounce Kirstin/Kirsten? "Ker-sten" or "Keer-sten"?

numbers123
05-13-2011, 04:29 AM
..delete

vesperholly
05-13-2011, 05:06 AM
My dad used to call my uncle, who was 9 when he and my mother met, "xiao bao" which in Chinese means little precious one. Unfortunately, he STILL calls him this - said uncle is now in his thirties and did not appreciate it when my baby sister, who was struggling with Chinese, started calling him "xiao biao" (little clock).

There was a girl in my freshman year dorm named Xiaoling. I always thought it was very pretty and nice of her parents to give her a Chinese name. No one had trouble pronouncing it.

Bunny Hop
05-13-2011, 06:54 AM
I HATE seeing people give girls boys' names. I don't mean the commonly used unisex ones like Chris (provided you don't name a girl Christopher) or Alex (which can be short for Alexandra) but names like Michael and Kevin that are sometimes given to girls. It almost never seems to go the other way around (who'd name a boy Mary or Susan?.My husband was once told at work that he needed to "Go and see Greg" to get some admin problem sorted out. Naturally he said, "Great, where do I find him?". The person he was speaking to gave him a whithering look, and replied "It's a she" in a tone that suggested EVERYONE knows Greg is a girl's name. Had it been George (Georgina) or something he would have understood, but what the heck is Greg as a girl short for?

Ozzisk8tr
05-13-2011, 10:22 AM
My dad used to call my uncle, who was 9 when he and my mother met, "xiao bao" which in Chinese means little precious one. Unfortunately, he STILL calls him this - said uncle is now in his thirties and did not appreciate it when my baby sister, who was struggling with Chinese, started calling him "xiao biao" (little clock).

Different aunt and uncle have two kids, whom my grandfather insisted on naming. He came up with lovely traditional Chinese names, but the parents wanted them to have easily pronounceable English names. :shuffle: So the kids were named Alex and Emily and the grandfather was never told, and when they go back to China to visit they just have to remember that their names have suddenly changed. :lol:

It could have been worse, what if she had left the letter "l" out of the second word. :eek:

AnnieD
05-13-2011, 10:15 PM
How do you pronounce Kirstin/Kirsten? "Ker-sten" or "Keer-sten"?

We have loads of Kirstens over here, and Kirsty as well. The way it's pronounced in Scotland is just the way we pronounce our letter "I." I've heard it pronounced by Americans as Keer-sten but we sound it more like "Kur-sten" (same way as Kurt).

karissamolitor
05-13-2011, 11:02 PM
I have a student named Nevaeh in my Kindergarten class. I had never heard of it before, and I keep spelling it wrong because it's such an odd name to me!

clarie
05-13-2011, 11:55 PM
My neice's little girl (1 yr now) is named "Coco Rose". At first I thought :eek: but actually it suits her, and goes nicely with her last name. At least when she's older, people will remember her name and associate it with something good to eat :lol:

Clarice
05-13-2011, 11:56 PM
I have a student named Nevaeh in my Kindergarten class. I had never heard of it before, and I keep spelling it wrong because it's such an odd name to me!

You know it's "heaven" spelled backwards, right? At least your little Nevaeh is apparently spelling it correctly. That name drives me batty anyway, but it's even worse when they spell it "Neveah", and THEN try to tell you it's heaven spelled backwards! I don't get the current fad for backwards-spelled names - I've also seen "Legna" and "Semaj" (although I don't know how to pronounce that one).

my little pony
05-14-2011, 02:12 AM
what is the point of james backwards?

other than to signal strangers that you are a whackjob

emason
05-14-2011, 02:19 AM
what is the point of james backwards?



Perhaps there several other Jameses in the family already, like Nomar Garciaparra, whose family has said that there were just too many Ramons. Ramon is a Garciaparra family name, but they just had to change it up and go a different route because there were so many around when he was born.

JasperBoy
05-14-2011, 03:26 AM
I have always believed that the name Jennifer became popular after the Donovan song "Jennifer Juniper". It came out in 1968, before Love Story.

As for terrible names, I know of a young girl named Levi. Maybe she should have been called Jean!

Vagabond
05-14-2011, 05:23 AM
what is the point of james backwards?

other than to signal strangers that you are a whackjob

:) !ynop elttil ym ,tniop eht yltcaxe si taht

KikiSashaFan
05-14-2011, 05:28 AM
I went to school with a guy whose first name was his last named spelled backwards. Luckily for him they were both legitimate names on their own, but it did look a little funny.