PDA

View Full Version : Interview questions and how to answer.



Pages : 1 2 [3] 4 5 6

genevieve
03-22-2011, 03:11 PM
Congrats on the great interview experience FiveRinger! I hope you get the job :)

I'm a bit old school and like personal notes, but I think email thank yous are the way things are moving - especially if you know there's a quick hiring timeline.

Cupid
03-22-2011, 03:38 PM
Off topic, but my sister is interviewing for an accounts receivable position in her company in Arizona. She told me some stories about a couple of the "candidates" that had me ROFLMAO!

One man, when asked what he knew about the company, paused for about 10 seconds and then said "nothing".!! He then proceeded to mumble the rest of his answers to her questions. Goodbye.

A woman she interviewed interrupted her mid-sentence with her hand flat out to stop my sister from her speaking (she likened it to the Stop in the Name of Love signal Diana Ross used). When my sister stopped talking, the interviewee proceeded to ask, "What perks does this company have?" :rofl: She escorted her to the door.

Still yet another woman came in with a disheveled suit on with obvious dirt marks on the skirt and began speaking with the words, "my partner and I".:shuffle:

Funny stuff! She also said nobody dresses up professionally, and only one woman wore a nice skirt and top. Everyone else basically just threw on slacks any and old shirt/top. Not too impressive.

genevieve
03-22-2011, 04:23 PM
Still yet another woman came in with a disheveled suit on with obvious dirt marks on the skirt and began speaking with the words, "my partner and I".:shuffle:
Not sure what's wrong with the "my partner and I" part, but is it possible that this person is experiencing hard financial times?


She also said nobody dresses up professionally, and only one woman wore a nice skirt and top. Everyone else basically just threw on slacks any and old shirt/top. Not too impressive.
Is it a professional dress office?

I interview in business casual, but there's a wide variety of what's considered business casual. I wear pants and what I consider a nice shirt, but if someone is expecting the upper range of business casual - or worse, that women should always wear skirts :scream: - I could see someone thinking I just threw on some old thing :fragile:

ioana
03-22-2011, 04:43 PM
This is slightly OT, but what is going on with candidates using LinkedIn (http://www.linkedin.com) after an interview? My company is looking to hire someone else in my group and one of the candidates -and not one of the stronger ones- sent me an email asking to connect on Linkedin a week after I interviewed her. This, after being told we're in the early stages of the hiring process and will know about second round or making decisions in about a month. I was not impressed. And, after talking to one of the managers, it turns out a different candidate did the same thing last month.

What are these kiddies thinking? Do they understand Linkedin is not be used as facebook where you randomly ask people to add you to their network after meeting them at an interview? :shuffle:

Aceon6
03-22-2011, 04:46 PM
What are these kiddies thinking? Do they understand Linkedin is not be used as facebook where you randomly ask people to add you to their network after meeting them at an interview? :shuffle:

Short answer, no. They've been told by someone that they should use LinkedIn, but never read the FAQ and don't spend enough time there to figure out how it works.

FiveRinger
03-22-2011, 04:56 PM
I wore a dress and flats to my interview (I am 5 ft 9 in tall and didn't want to be overbearing to the interviewer in heels). But that is what I felt comfortable in. I would think that dress pants and a nice blouse should be okay for an interview as long as you are neat, clean, and look like you made a conscious effort in your appearance.

Debbie S
03-22-2011, 05:00 PM
What are these kiddies thinking? Do they understand Linkedin is not be used as facebook where you randomly ask people to add you to their network after meeting them at an interview? :shuffle:Maybe they're looking for a way to send a thank-you note after the interview? Did you give them your business card at the interview? If not, they wouldn't have another way of getting in touch with you....although they could ask HR for the info, if HR actually responded to their request.

I've been going through interviews for about a year and it's frustrating when you don't get the person's business card to follow up. I will usually ask if they don't provide it, but a lot of times we've been in a conf room, away from their office, or they tell me they're out of cards, in the process of getting new ones, etc. I guess they don't expect a thank-you e-mail in that case, but I always feel weird not following up.

On the subject of dress, I always wear business formal to interviews. In the winter, I tend to wear a pantsuit; I remember in college (early 90s) they told us women should not wear pants to interviews, but it seems attitudes have changed since then...in b-school in 2003, they said pantsuits were acceptable business formal for women. Even if the workplace itself is business casual or casual, a job candidate should not match that - it can be seen as presumptuous - i.e. you're not an employee there yet so you haven't earned the 'privilege'.

genevieve
03-22-2011, 05:03 PM
I wore a dress and flats to my interview (I am 5 ft 9 in tall and didn't want to be overbearing to the interviewer in heels).
PML! For some reason I always thought you were a guy :lol:

FiveRinger
03-22-2011, 05:40 PM
PML! For some reason I always thought you were a guy :lol:

If I was a guy and had worn the same outfit that might have assured me of the job! Lol!!

genevieve
03-22-2011, 05:44 PM
On the subject of dress, I always wear business formal to interviews. In the winter, I tend to wear a pantsuit; I remember in college (early 90s) they told us women should not wear pants to interviews, but it seems attitudes have changed since then...in b-school in 2003, they said pantsuits were acceptable business formal for women. Even if the workplace itself is business casual or casual, a job candidate should not match that - it can be seen as presumptuous - i.e. you're not an employee there yet so you haven't earned the 'privilege'.
I see what you're saying, but if the agency is business casual, there's no 'privilege' to it.

It's definitely better to err on the side of overdressing for an interview, but showing up in a 3-piece suit in an office that's just plain casual can make someone seem just as out of step (I was part of a hire process like this and the person was not hired in part because they seemed way too stuffy for the company culture). This is where doing some research on the org ahead of time can really help.

overedge
03-22-2011, 05:45 PM
Short answer, no. They've been told by someone that they should use LinkedIn, but never read the FAQ and don't spend enough time there to figure out how it works.

I had this happen to me as well last week, and the weirdest thing about it was that I had never met the person - I only knew she was a job candidate because I happened upon a conversation in the lunchroom where interviewee names were being discussed. I can only guess that after the interview she looked up the names of the administrators in the department and decided to try to improve her chances at the job by asking them all to join her network. For me...it hurt her chances more than anything.

ioana
03-22-2011, 05:47 PM
Maybe they're looking for a way to send a thank-you note after the interview? Did you give them your business card at the interview? If not, they wouldn't have another way of getting in touch with you....although they could ask HR for the info, if HR actually responded to their request..

It's nice of you to give them the benefit of the doubt, but she had my business card and already sent out a thank you email the weekend after the interview. Plus, the add request didn't reference the interview or even hint at a follow-up attempt.

Hello, ioana!
How are you? I'd like to add you to my professional network on LinkedIn.
Thank you.

I agree looking for jobs can be frustrating and I was ready to start hitting my head against a wall when I was unemployed for half a year. I just think there are (much!) better ways of reiterating your interest in the job and asking an interviewer how the hiring process is going besides adding them on linkedin and asking 'how are you?' :confused:

I hope one of your next interviews turns out to be your next job, Debbie! Same thing for BC & everyone else who posted about their current interviews.

Cupid
03-22-2011, 06:09 PM
My sister does the hiring at her place of business. She is an account manager for a large corporation. She hires mostly support staff such as clerical, administrative, and above.

Here are some tips if you are interviewing:

Learn something about the company before you show up for your interview.

Dress neatly and professionally - dress slacks/jacket/dress/skirt for women and suit or dress slacks/shirt and tie for the men and appropriate shoes. She absolutely frowns upon women who have a lot of cleavage showing!!

Wear clothes that are pressed, fit well, and most importantly - clean!

Don't mumble, don't interrupt while the interviewer is speaking - save your questions and comments for later in the interview, when asked.

DON'T ASK ABOUT BENEFITS AND "PERKS". These are discussed after she makes an offer of employment.

That's not too much to ask!

FiveRinger
03-23-2011, 09:28 PM
Hi! I just wanted to give an update and ask some additional questions.

I have a second interview scheduled for Monday. I am so excited that I can hardly see. My interview is scheduled with the director of the department. My previous interview was with the manager. My biggest question is how is this interview going to differ from the previous one? What types of questions do I need to be prepared to answer? I am confident that I made a good impression, otherwise I wouldn't have been called for a second interview, but I am just trying to understand the differences between the first and second interview.

I also need to know where I can get a good idea about salaries. I want to make sure that if I am asked about salary (I know not to mention this unless I am asked directly), I want to know what I need to tell my interviewer. Should I be indirect unless I am made a proper offer? Where can I find out about average salary for the job that I will be doing so that I don't price myself out of the job?

Any help that you can provide is highly appreciated!

agalisgv
03-23-2011, 09:55 PM
Real quickly, look up the company on glassceiling.com. They will have the salary ranges for your work at that company--that will give you an idea of what they offer. You can also look up salaries with competing companies to get a sense of how competitive their salaries are.

Congrats on the callback!