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View Full Version : Mom Sues Preschool for Not Prepping 4 Yr. Old for Elite University



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IceAlisa
03-16-2011, 02:18 AM
It's actually really hard to judge from the article exactly what happened. But lets say, the school promised they'd prep the kids for that kindergarten entry test. And instead her precocious 4 year old was put with 2 year olds and doing 2 year old appropriate activities. May be she was telling her parents that she is bored.

That would not be what was advertised by the school. And if you are paying $19K, you expect what you paid for. You expect the product as advertised.

Imagine that she complained and the school blew her off as they've already pocketed the non-refundable tuition. So she felt stuck and the way out was to sue for tuition and put her in another school.

agalisgv
03-16-2011, 04:48 AM
Imagine that she complained and the school blew her off as they've already pocketed the non-refundable tuition. So she felt stuck and the way out was to sue for tuition and put her in another school. According to the NY Post:
Imprescia said she "brought her concerns to the attention of defendant's administrators," and they "acknowledged the falsehood," the suit says, without elaborating. http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/manhattan/prep_files_suit_against_entry_preschool_PrY32mNfMy UdwW2JQqVE3I#ixzz1GjeVOtQR

Prancer
03-16-2011, 12:39 PM
I've read several articles about this now, and there seems to be a lot of conflicting info.

For example, she and her lawyer have been quoted as saying that the child was pulled out after two months. But a school spokesperson was quoted saying that the child attended for a full year. And somewhere else I read that it was most of the the year. Then I read that the child was only sometimes mixed in with younger kids, but that was not a regular occurrence. In agalisgv's link, it says it happened ONCE: "In one instance, plaintiff's daughter, who at the time was 4 - perhaps the most important year for a pre-schooler, just shy of taking the ERB - was dumped with two-year-olds," the suit says (http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/manhattan/prep_files_suit_against_entry_preschool_PrY32mNfMy UdwW2JQqVE3I#ixzz1GlUMFyiT).

What stands out for me is that she is suing about events that took place in 2009. That would mean her daughter has already taken the ever-so-important kindergarten test. I wonder if the child did not do as well as her mother expected. No one has said so, but what else is the mother going to use as evidence that the school curriculum wasn't demanding enough?

Aceon6
03-16-2011, 12:52 PM
What stands out for me is that she is suing about events that took place in 2009. That would mean her daughter has already taken the ever-so-important kindergarten test. I wonder if the child did not do as well as her mother expected. No one has said so, but what else is the mother going to use as evidence that the school curriculum wasn't demanding enough?

My nephew took that test in 2009 and did very well. His prior education background was 2 days a week of public preschool. Of course, his parents read to him from the time he was born, and started counting and basic math with him when he started to talk.

I guess he must have had an unfair advantage from learning a few words of Japanese from his best friend's parents and from the street Spanish he picked up. It couldn't possibly be that his parents taught him and didn't dump him in a prestigious preschool. :lol:

Badams
03-16-2011, 04:21 PM
There's a test for kindergarten? I feel very sheltered, living in a tiny town where every kid goes to the same school. A public school. For free. Oh well...less pressure and more time to just be a kid is how I look at it.

Prancer
03-16-2011, 05:03 PM
There's a test for kindergarten? I feel very sheltered, living in a tiny town where every kid goes to the same school. A public school. For free.

I do, too, but both of my kids still had to test to get into kindergarten. it wasn't an admission test, which is what they are talking about there, but it was an assessment test that was supposed to evaluate their preparedness.

manleywoman
03-16-2011, 05:05 PM
There's a test for kindergarten? I feel very sheltered, living in a tiny town where every kid goes to the same school. A public school. For free. Oh well...less pressure and more time to just be a kid is how I look at it.

Nowadays, sadly there can be. Chicago has this in some schools too. It's a navigational nightmare for a parent, especially if you don't have the $$$ for private school. I'm wading these waters right now and it's hard to figure out what's what.

Badams
03-16-2011, 05:12 PM
I do, too, but both of my kids still had to test to get into kindergarten. it wasn't an admission test, which is what they are talking about there, but it was an assessment test that was supposed to evaluate their preparedness.

That's exactly what they do here...an evaluation of skills so they know what areas to focus on for each kid. No pass/fail or I'm sorry, your kid isn't good enough for this school. Sometimes small towns have their advantages.

jeffisjeff
03-16-2011, 06:15 PM
That's exactly what they do here...an evaluation of skills so they know what areas to focus on for each kid. No pass/fail or I'm sorry, your kid isn't good enough for this school. Sometimes small towns have their advantages.

We don't even have any of that. It is more "if you kid is born between these dates, it is time for them to start kindergarten, ready or not." :lol:

Garden Kitty
03-16-2011, 06:28 PM
If you want a better look at the process, check out Nursery University (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1213832/plotsummary) - a documentary that was aired on Showtime among other places.

Fascinating and scary all at the same time.

Aceon6
03-16-2011, 11:25 PM
If you want a better look at the process, check out Nursery University (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1213832/plotsummary) - a documentary that was aired on Showtime among other places.

Fascinating and scary all at the same time.

My nephew and his family live in an area of NYC with a large population of well heeled dual income families. When my niece-in-law got pregnant, neighbors nearly scared her to death about getting on the admission lists for certain pre-schools as soon as the baby was born. Well, they're not nearly as well off as some of the neighbors, so pricey pre-school and was out of the question. They still get quizzed often about their choice to use public schools. They're treated as if they enrolled their kid in some sort of fanatic cult school. Fortunately, they won the school lottery and got their kid in an EXCELLENT school which guarantees his brother a slot, too.

IceAlisa
03-17-2011, 12:37 AM
I've read several articles about this now, and there seems to be a lot of conflicting info.

For example, she and her lawyer have been quoted as saying that the child was pulled out after two months. But a school spokesperson was quoted saying that the child attended for a full year. And somewhere else I read that it was most of the the year. Then I read that the child was only sometimes mixed in with younger kids, but that was not a regular occurrence. In agalisgv's link, it says it happened ONCE: "In one instance, plaintiff's daughter, who at the time was 4 - perhaps the most important year for a pre-schooler, just shy of taking the ERB - was dumped with two-year-olds," the suit says (http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/manhattan/prep_files_suit_against_entry_preschool_PrY32mNfMy UdwW2JQqVE3I#ixzz1GlUMFyiT).

What stands out for me is that she is suing about events that took place in 2009. That would mean her daughter has already taken the ever-so-important kindergarten test. I wonder if the child did not do as well as her mother expected. No one has said so, but what else is the mother going to use as evidence that the school curriculum wasn't demanding enough?

It's all awfully confusing. I don't think that I have enough information to really form an opinion. But as agalisgv's link said, they've acknowledged the falsehood--shouldn't they had given the money back at that point?

If you want a better look at the process, check out Nursery University (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1213832/plotsummary) - a documentary that was aired on Showtime among other places.

Fascinating and scary all at the same time. I finally got around to partially watching it. But even before I saw it, I knew unless I had unlimited income, I'd high tail it out of NYC as soon as my pregnancy test turned positive. Not an easy place to raise a child, that's for sure.

Prancer
03-17-2011, 01:17 AM
But as agalisgv's link said, they've acknowledged the falsehood--shouldn't they had given the money back at that point?

The link said that the mother said that the school had acknowledged the falsehood.

In the shark-infested waters of New York preschools, can you see a preschool director making such a foolish admission? Not that it couldn't possibly happen--maybe it did--but I think it's unlikely enough that I would like to know exactly how that acknowledgment was stated before I just accept what this woman says about the school.

It seems to me that she wants her tuition back; she signed a contract saying that the tuition is non-refundable. Therefore, she has to prove fraud. I hope she has something better than "My child spent a day with two-year-olds and they dared to teach her colors and shapes."

IceAlisa
03-17-2011, 01:19 AM
Well, of course. If that's her only grievance, that her child spent some time with the little ones, even if it's a few weeks, I don't think she has a leg to stand on. But if it's the whole year (and how long did the girl attend the school? That's also confusing) and say, no French lessons, no test prep and doing 2 year old level activities instead, then yes, I'd say that's fraud.

I have no idea what really happened though. The reporting is so fragmented.

Prancer
03-17-2011, 01:41 AM
I have no idea what really happened though. The reporting is so fragmented.

But what stands out to me is that neither mother nor lawyer have EVER claimed that the child didn't get French or anything else that was listed on the website.

What they have said in every quote I have read is that:

The school said that it offered separate curriculum by age, and the child was sometimes mixed in with children of other ages, although how often this happened is unclear.

The curriculum was not what the mother deemed advanced enough--although she has never claimed that it was not what the school promised, only that it wasn't what she considered advanced enough for a four-year-old.

Have they actually claimed anything else?