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View Full Version : Johnny Weir news, quotes and articles - v.3



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Sylvia
06-26-2011, 11:07 PM
Johnny will be in the cast of Fantasy on Ice on July 2&3 in Fukuoka, Japan. Cast includes Lambiel, Verner, Ando, Oda, and more.
Here's the thread in GSD for the "Fantasy on Ice" shows: http://www.fsuniverse.net/forum/showthread.php?t=79133

In this 6/23 St. Petersburg, Florida article, Weir mentions that "Be Good Johnny Weir" will be aired on Logo for a second season in November: http://www2.tbo.com/entertainment/events/2011/jun/23/famed-skater-celebrate-st-pete-pride-festival-ar-239349/

judiz
06-27-2011, 11:20 AM
http://www.figureskatersonline.com/johnnyweir/home/2011/06/johnny-weir-to-be-face-of-mac-holiday-line/


Johnny to be the face of MAC cosmetics holiday line.

antmanb
06-27-2011, 03:35 PM
@antmanb re your post #287 in this thread: “… I’ve given [Johnny] crap on this board for being closeted…” Oh well, I have seen this expressed before on Internet sites, not necessarily just on FSU either -- but, Johnny “closeted.” When? Do you mean b/c he didn’t call a press conference to confess being gay, after he won his first Nationals? Who among the many gay skaters in figure skating (besides Rudy Galindo) have ever confessed to being gay during their eligible career? What is it exactly that makes you describe Johnny as having been “closeted”? Not to start anymore arguments: just askin’. IMHO, Johnny has often taken the heat for being a “flamboyant” [;) term for gay] outspoken skater, and as a result some of the more rigid attitudes regarding how gay skaters should present themselves on the ice, have become a bit more relaxed.


Wow, considering you claim to not want any more arguments, you sure did well speculating about the ways in which I might have criticised him and went on to argue against a point i never made :rofl:

I specifically gave Johnny crap for being "closeted" when he very publically got GLAAD all riled up about his supposed issues with SOI. As a gay person it felt hypocrtical to get a gay rights organisation to fight his battles for him, when he would still not stand up and say he was gay. That was pretty much it. No big deal.

Justathoughtabl
06-27-2011, 06:39 PM
It took Johnny a long time to say "I'm gay," but he never tried to hide either. You could say GLAAD should only support people who identify as LGBT, or you could argue that it should fight homophobia in any form, even if it's against someone who isn't openly gay. I should mention that whether SOI was actually being homophobic is still up for debate, though I think it was GLAAD's perception of homophobia, and not Johnny's. I don't want to stir the pot on this argument, though, as I hope it's pretty much simmered down.

In other news, Johnny has become more vocal about LGBT issues lately, and I think better late than never, although he never had any obligation to be an activist. Tonight he's appearing at the Trevor Project fundraiser.

http://www.thetrevorproject.org/trevorlive

REO
06-27-2011, 07:31 PM
I specifically gave Johnny crap for being "closeted" when he very publically got GLAAD all riled up about his supposed issues with SOI. As a gay person it felt hypocrtical to get a gay rights organisation to fight his battles for him, when he would still not stand up and say he was gay. That was pretty much it. No big deal.

That is a point well taken. I can totally see where you're coming from. I always thought though, that he refused to actually say the words during his competitive career from a fear of being judged unfairly. As long as he never said those three little words there was always the wiggle room that he was just a very artistic soul with a flair for "out there" costuming. Lord knows he never really tried to hide his real self. And my theory could be a total crock too but everyone handles it differently. He's a very complex person. Mr Grand Marshall is certainly embracing the three little words these days. :lol:

Jenny
06-28-2011, 01:41 PM
I always thought though, that he refused to actually say the words during his competitive career from a fear of being judged unfairly. As long as he never said those three little words there was always the wiggle room that he was just a very artistic soul with a flair for "out there" costuming. Lord knows he never really tried to hide his real self. And my theory could be a total crock too but everyone handles it differently. He's a very complex person.

Not sure I agree. Johnny seems to me a bit of a tease - revealing some but not all, dropping tidbits here and there that make people speculate (I'm thinking of his references to drug use for example). His right of course, and while it may have been in response to the constant scrutiny, it may have also been an effort to generate constant scrutiny.

Would this affect how he's judged? I don't think so. If it was well-known in the skating world the whole time, what difference does it make if he makes it official? It's not like it's going to damage the sport, because non-fans think most of the men in skating must be gay anyway.

If anything, I think his days in the closet - with the door wide open apparently - only served to annoy people like the USFSA in the context of his ongoing quest to be different and refusal to play along with the rest of them. If I were the USFSA, I'd have zero problem with Johnny's sexuality - it would be everything else that he did or might have done making me worry about the image of the organization and sport.

Justathoughtabl
06-28-2011, 02:14 PM
Not sure I agree. Johnny seems to me a bit of a tease - revealing some but not all, dropping tidbits here and there that make people speculate (I'm thinking of his references to drug use for example). His right of course, and while it may have been in response to the constant scrutiny, it may have also been an effort to generate constant scrutiny.


What were the drug references, besides the descriptions of skating programs as "vodka shot/cocaine" versus "brandy"? I could see myself making a metaphor like that, but it certainly would be a stretch to assume from this that I take drugs.

Jenny
06-28-2011, 03:30 PM
What were the drug references, besides the descriptions of skating programs as "vodka shot/cocaine" versus "brandy"? I could see myself making a metaphor like that, but it certainly would be a stretch to assume from this that I take drugs.

I was thinking of a specific article in the Vancouver Sun during the Olympics, which I just searched for and it's no longer on line. I don't want to attempt to recreate the quote, but it was something to the effect of "they don't like me [because among other things] I like to make drug references."

Repeated drug references, particularly in the context of what using them is like, naturally leads the listener to think the speaker has some experience in using drugs. I'm not saying that Johnny ever did drugs - the point is that he threw around the language for effect, and tried to be cool or something by sounding like he knew what he was talking about. I can see where the USFSA would have a problem with that, more so than the likely possibility that he was gay, which was the point of my post.

RockTheTassel
06-28-2011, 10:31 PM
Repeated drug references, particularly in the context of what using them is like, naturally leads the listener to think the speaker has some experience in using drugs.

I'm not sure about that. Plenty of people in the spotlight and out of it make drug referrences, and it's never taken seriously. I have a really hard time believing that because he compared another skater's program to snorting cocain, someone seriously believed that Weir might have experience using drugs. The time he said it (and the times he's referrenced saying it) have all clearly had a tone that implies he was joking, imo.

That being said, I'm sure the USFSA and SOI don't like the jokes about drugs because it doesn't give the family friendly image they want to project.

REO
06-29-2011, 04:20 AM
I'm not sure about that. Plenty of people in the spotlight and out of it make drug referrences, and it's never taken seriously. I have a really hard time believing that because he compared another skater's program to snorting cocain, someone seriously believed that Weir might have experience using drugs. The time he said it (and the times he's referrenced saying it) have all clearly had a tone that implies he was joking, imo.

That being said, I'm sure the USFSA and SOI don't like the jokes about drugs because it doesn't give the family friendly image they want to project.

I agree with you Tassel. USFSA sent him to media training because of his vodka shot line. I'm not sure they appreciate the gay image any more than they do the drug references. JMO but I think figure skating would maybe appeal to more people in the 2000s if they were a little less buttoned up. If Michael Vick can make a comeback in football, Johnny should be able to joke about the effects of programs as a snort of cocaine versus a brandy and cigarette.

Jenny
06-29-2011, 02:16 PM
I don't think it's about being buttoned up or family friendly. Figure skating is a sport in the Olympics, where any kind of drug use is taken very seriously. Figure skating also struggles to be taken seriously as a sport and not just entertainment, so has to work even harder to prove that its participants are serious, trained, disciplined and talented athletes. References to drugs may be acceptable in the entertainment world, but not in sports.

If Johnny is so creative and expressive, surely he could have found other ways to describe programs, but IMO he did it for effect, to push the envelope, to tease people, and to test his boundaries with the USFSA and even the ISU/IOC.

Justathoughtabl
06-29-2011, 02:49 PM
I don't think it's about being buttoned up or family friendly. Figure skating is a sport in the Olympics, where any kind of drug use is taken very seriously. Figure skating also struggles to be taken seriously as a sport and not just entertainment, so has to work even harder to prove that its participants are serious, trained, disciplined and talented athletes. References to drugs may be acceptable in the entertainment world, but not in sports.

If Johnny is so creative and expressive, surely he could have found other ways to describe programs, but IMO he did it for effect, to push the envelope, to tease people, and to test his boundaries with the USFSA and even the ISU/IOC.

I think he did it because it was funny and he just couldn't help himself. He likes to have fun with people, that's all. Under most circumstances, a comment like that would be completely harmless. The press even laughed when he said it (realizing immediately that he meant it to be funny), but then realized the potential for a story there and started stirring the pot with the USFSA, which they knew would react because it IS quite conservative. The press loves a funny quote, but they love a good story more. And they turned one small joke into more than it was, and they continue to do that whenever they say that "Johnny Weir likes to make drug references," implying to the uninformed that Johnny Weir habitually makes references to taking drugs and therefore probably takes drugs.

overedge
06-29-2011, 02:58 PM
The press even laughed when he said it (realizing immediately that he meant it to be funny), but then realized the potential for a story there and started stirring the pot with the USFSA, which they knew would react because it IS quite conservative.

You are making a lot of inferences about what the press thought and did in reaction to Johnny's statements.

It's also possible that the media who were there when he made the statements were laughing in a "OMG I can't believe he said that" way, not because they thought what he said was funny.

And if you call contacting the USFSA for reaction to Johnny's statements "stirring the pot", OK, but I would call it "doing their jobs". It's responsible reporting to get the other side of every story. I think most sports reporters have a lot more important things to do with their time than deliberately manufacturing discontent between skaters and the USFSA.

REO
06-29-2011, 04:43 PM
That's the thing about the Federation. The reporters knew they could get a rise out of them by making a big deal out of Johnny's statements because they are so stodgy. Johnny is the only skater who doesn't mouth the usual drek about just trying his best and working hard. If your boss tells you to go write a story about skating, it gets hard to get more than a paragraph on someone who is too shy or uptight to talk except in practiced lines they learned in media training. Johnny has a big personality. He's fun and interesting and remember that he was like 20 years old at the time. What kids don't talk like that in the real world?
The idea that skaters should be more circumspect because it's an Olympic sport is dopey. The Olympics is not a religious camp meeting. It's a sporting event. He wasn't referring to performance enhancing drugs. I would be willing to bet that none of the snowboarders would think twice about saying those things. lol

Justathoughtabl
06-29-2011, 05:10 PM
I would say the press could have laughed because the statement was funny AND because they couldn't believe a skater in a very conservative federation would have the guts to say something like that. I'm guessing that they saw a story there and ran with it. You say it's their job to get two sides to a story; it's also their job to find the story, and they MADE a story out of something that really isn't a big deal in many more liberal circles. He didn't say he takes drugs. He didn't take drugs then lie about it. He compared two skating programs to the effects of drugs, in a very innocuous way. But by asking the federation what they thought, the press wanted (and I'm inferring here, yes) to get some good quotes and make a story out of it. Now Johnny Weir is forever linked to "drug references," whatever that means. On a much smaller scale, it reminds me of John Lennon's "bigger than Jesus" statement. :lol: The U.S. (and I'm American) is a very conservative country, still.

Oh, and as for the press having more important things to do than manufacturing discontent? That's what they do. They find stories, and if necessary, they highlight certain statements to make things seem bigger than they are. The Johnny/Evan feud, anyone? Beatles versus Stones? Paul McCartney is dead?