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View Full Version : Massive Earthqake in Japan- Will this affect Worlds?(threads merged)



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Skittl1321
03-12-2011, 10:22 PM
I know what Rise is about. What I don't see a connection to is a wipe out of the entier USA team and coaches and this event in Japan. How can this be connected in anyway? The connection makes no sense at all to me, can you explain it?
I don't see that the entire team would be wiped out by going unless it was something like the air disaster that happened. And don't teams make their own arrangements now? Maybe the USFSA should quit sending teams anywhere where air travel is needed? :rolleyes:

Maybe the thought is if there was a significant aftershock while the event was going on that may collapse the arena? Thus the whole team dying/being injured? I think that would have a WAY more significant impact on figure skating than the air disaster the US team faced- the whole of figure skating would be wiped out...

Or if they were all subjected to radiation sickness that caused them to have to stop skating?

It's a weak connection, if there is one at all.

I do think the USFSA still needs to consider if it is safe to send skaters, even if the ISU holds the event (I'm thinking at this point, it's getting more unlikely- it's just too soon... if they had a month, it would be a lot more likely), but I think the connection to RISE isn't likely to cross their minds.

Sylvia
03-12-2011, 10:25 PM
Péchalat/Bourzat interview article published today: http://web.icenetwork.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20110312&content_id=16920690&vkey=ice_news
Excerpt:

Bourzat: This event is such a tragedy for Japan and the Japanese people. Yet we have absolutely no worry for ourselves. They are so serious about everything there, that we trust them 100 percent.

Péchalat: I have heard rumors that some skaters were frightened for their own safety. Actually, we feel exactly the opposite. We owe these championships to the numerous fans skating has in Japan. Seeing skating should help them. We must not close the door to them now, especially since they have just lived through horror. We hope our Charlie Chaplin program [their free dance for the current season] will help them fight and rebuild. It will be a minimal tribute, of course, but we will give all we have. We do not want to go there to cry, but to help them live something new in the present time as it is. Of course we are not humanitarians, but we certainly are humanists.

pat c
03-12-2011, 10:26 PM
I hope you hear from your family and friends soon yukster. Thanks for sharing.

The only reason I wouldn't go to worlds in Japan is if the country deemed fans/tourists to be a nuisance or in somehow impede safety or create problems.

My heart goes out to the people in Japan.

museksk8r
03-12-2011, 10:45 PM
Péchalat/Bourzat interview article published today: http://web.icenetwork.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20110312&content_id=16920690&vkey=ice_news
Excerpt:

Nathalie and Fabian are such beautiful people with beautiful spirits, and so is Miki . . . I just read her twitter: http://twitter.com/181712 - "we have to be strong and looking forward to get better as soon as possible. what i can do is just cheer them up and cross my fingers!!!!!" "i really want to help but i cant do anything... i feel so sad with this. but for now we cant be just sad.." "i dont want to miss the world but now i feel not really looking forward to do that because its to hard and to hurts."

I really feel the ISU council and the skating federations will make the best decision for all parties involved in holding the World Championships. I do think the people of Japan will benefit positively from holding the event and the raised spirits and revenue that competitive figure skating can bring to the country at this upsetting time. An escape or release, even just temporarily, from the reality of tragedy is sometimes just what the human spirit needs to cope through adversity. Think Joannie at the Olympics. No doubt the country could positively benefit from the monetary gain as well. Skating fans are supporting you and all the world's skaters and all people of Japan, Miki. Love you all! <3

euterpe
03-12-2011, 10:47 PM
Rise is the recently released film about the plane crash in Belgium, when the American team was headed for Worlds, that wiped out the entire USA team and their coaches. There might be some apprehension that this could happen again, i.e the entire team being lost again .



Because of the 1961 tragedy, US skaters and coaches never travel together to a competition. Each individual makes his/her own travel arrangements. So if there was danger in Tokyo, the danger would be the same for all skaters and teams from every country, not just the US team. I am sure that if conditions in Tokyo are still deemed to be dangerous by early next week, the competition will be postponed, cancelled, or moved to another location.

soxxy
03-12-2011, 10:54 PM
Breaking news at cnn.com


Meltdown may be under way at Fukushima Daiichi's nuclear power reactor, an official with Japan's safety agency says.

missing
03-12-2011, 10:56 PM
Apparently there are problems with a second nuclear reactor: http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/businesstechnology/2014473724_apasjapanearthquake.html

One of the problems is whatever decision is made will have to be made hastily. Things may be very different a week from now, but by then it will be too late to change plans, regardless of what those plans might be.

This is a genuinely ignorant question, but does it take a lot of electricity to hold a skating event? The ice has to be kept frozen and ideally the stands are heated. Leaving aside any questions about safety and transportation, would the amount of energy needed for the arena be a factor in the decision making?

walei
03-12-2011, 11:31 PM
I am at Taipei airport flying out to China for business trip. Looking at the boards it seems all flights out to Narita are on schedule.

I hope the Worlds will go on as planned provided everything is safe and not a hindrance to the relieve efforts in Japan. Got a little choked up watching a big team of Taiwan rescue workers checking in to fly to Japan. I also want to say that the people of Japan are settings an examplary model on keeping calm and order under such awful crisis. I have the utmost confidence that if any nation and its people can get through this with order and effiencency it's going to be the Japanese.

Tammi
03-12-2011, 11:31 PM
Because of the 1961 tragedy, US skaters and coaches never travel together to a competition. Each individual makes his/her own travel arrangements.They don't travel as a US contingent, but coaches and their skaters usually do fly together. Travel arrangements are made by USFS. Sometimes the "team" meets up at a central airport to continue their flight, after leaving from their local airports. It all depends on the flight schedules.

Thoughts and prayers go out to everyone affected by this disaster ((())).

Asli
03-12-2011, 11:41 PM
So I don't get it...if worlds do go on as planned Amodio won't be there and will be giving up a chance to win a medal? I just hope the other skaters who are coming in next week don't miss the competition because the flights are delayed.

The flights are on schedule. Apparently Amodio's problem was that he couldn't immediately find a ticket home because all flights were booked for several days.

midori
03-12-2011, 11:45 PM
What I would need to look forward is the World Championships. If it is canceled, I would feel even more depressed. Although it is only me, who is luckily staying safely in Tokyo far from the epicenter, and I just do not know what people in the affected areas would say.

I understand if any participants and their families would feel uncomfortable about visiting a foreign country whose name they recently heard a lot of times being linked to a massive disaster.

Still, if there was not the things about the power plants, I would say "come on, there is no reason to cancel. just hold it already!" :). I added the "if" clause because I am not an expert on the field and I just do not have enough information and background to evaluate the risk from those stuff.

rfisher
03-12-2011, 11:54 PM
What I would need to look forward is the World Championships. If it is canceled, I would feel even more depressed. Although it is only me, who is luckily staying safely in Tokyo far from the epicenter, and I just do not know what people in the affected areas would say.

I understand if any participants and their families would feel uncomfortable about visiting a foreign country whose name they recently heard a lot of times being linked to a massive disaster.

Still, if there was not the things about the power plants, I would say "come on, there is no reason to cancel. just hold it already!" :). I added the "if" clause because I am not an expert on the field and I just do not have enough information and background to evaluate the risk from those stuff.

I would guess the issues with the power plants will be resolved within the next 24 hours. The radiation levels have declined. The *latest* breaking news is simply that an official told the news outlets there may be a core meltdown only because the engineers haven't been able to get close enough to verify. However, the declining radiation levels would indicate there has not. Moreover, there are measures in place that would contain such a meltdown. These were put in place after the Chernobyl accident. I know it's frightening, but I think that will not be a danger barring no additional quakes in the area.

AxelAnnie
03-13-2011, 12:01 AM
I would have to be a skater.....or a skater's mom. If World's is on....I would most likely NOT be the person sending my child...........I don't think we (or anyone else) will know the state of things for at least a week. And, as a parent or a young skater..........title or not........I don't think my kid would go.

Asli
03-13-2011, 12:05 AM
The *latest* breaking news is simply that an official told the news outlets there may be a core meltdown only because the engineers haven't been able to get close enough to verify. However, the declining radiation levels would indicate there has not. Moreover, there are measures in place that would contain such a meltdown. These were put in place after the Chernobyl accident. I know it's frightening, but I think that will not be a danger barring no additional quakes in the area.

Thanks again rfisher. Honestly, if I weren't able to read your and Marie's precisions I wouldn't get the picture at all from the media coverage.

nerdycool
03-13-2011, 12:09 AM
This is a genuinely ignorant question, but does it take a lot of electricity to hold a skating event? The ice has to be kept frozen and ideally the stands are heated. Leaving aside any questions about safety and transportation, would the amount of energy needed for the arena be a factor in the decision making?I don't know all the details of what goes on behind the scenes, but just guessing offhand, holding a major skating event uses a fair amount of electricity. The main culprits would be just keeping the ice frozen... and there are at least 2 rinks being used... one for the competition, and another for practice. There could be multiple sites for practice, too. Then there is the lighting and heating of those facilities, along with all the electricity used for scoreboards, media areas, etc. And then the skaters will presumably use some in their hotel rooms, too, for charging phones/watching TV/etc., as well as using hot water for washing/showers.

But from what I understand, the rationing of electricity is mostly a precaution until they get a feel for where things are wrt: the nuclear situation and/or future complications from aftershocks. And at this point, it's still too early to tell whether to lift the rationing.