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View Full Version : Can you name a sport that people did as well in the olden days as nowadays?



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snoopy
02-19-2011, 02:40 PM
Yeah, archery and equestrian were two that popped into my mind but even then I bet there are improvements via bow equipment and nutrition for horses. So darts it is!

Aceon6
02-19-2011, 03:03 PM
Bowling... the average score hasn't increased that much despite better equipment, use of elbow and wrist stabilizers, and consistent oiling of the lanes.

As for skating, I'm old enough to remember how figure skates were constructed in the 50s and 60s. There was very little support, so the stress on the ankles and shins was probably 100% more than it is today. The landing had to be very precise for the skater to support it and come out with some flow. It's not that the skaters didn't have the physical ability to jump higher and get more rotations, it's that the equipment worked best when the jump was more "out" than "up", lessening the stress on landing.

taf2002
02-19-2011, 03:18 PM
It was so refreshing NOT to see someone straining to grab their blade and yank it netherward.

Netherward = downward...is that what you meant?


Back to topic...Archery? Equestrian events? Polo? Rugby?

Definitely archery, probably fencing/swordfighting too. And I'm not sure the different forms of wrestling are improved from the past.

skatemommy
02-19-2011, 03:30 PM
Netherward = downward...is that what you meant?


Netherward = watching an American male pair skater in the required spiral sequence ;)

Wyliefan
02-19-2011, 03:51 PM
The first double axel wasn't landed in comp until 1948 (Button). The first double-double combo was 1949 (Button). The first triple wasn't landed until 1952 (Button).

You've got to hand it to Uncle Dick! He may drive some of us bonkers as a commentator, but he really is a legend.

Rob
02-19-2011, 05:04 PM
Figures were the emphasis of the sport, so when a person, today, talks about how amazing the skaters back then were - look at the skater's footwork, watch their figures.

Another thing I notice is that the skaters from those days all do beautiful leaning straight legged spread eagles. So gorgeous. No butt eagles or flat up and down positions with bent knees. Apart from Cassar, Wylie, Boitano and a few others, 1961 spread eagles were much more beautiful than modern day ones.

Speed is another thing. Without all the jumps and complex elements, the skaters retain their speed or even build through the program. Today's complex elements really slow many skaters downs.

I also loved the pivot and reverse spread eagle combinations of Bradley Lord - perhaps it is simple as opposed to today's footwork, but sometimes less is more.

MR-FAN
02-19-2011, 06:11 PM
The first triple jump in international competition by a man was Dick Button in 1952, which was a loop, and the first triple toe loop was '64, I think. The first in women's were later than the first in men. What were you expecting? :confused:


Forget the jumps, you'd think without worrying about triples, skaters would have more speed, interesting footwork, complex connecting steps between elements, fast centered spins, better crossovers, deeper edges, but watching Laurance's FS, all I see is slow and cautious skating, really poor spins, poor execution of the doubles, very bland choreography, a few 3-turns and a nice spread eagle. So yeah, underwhelming :P

I gotta say I actually laughed out loud when Dick said "this is an interesting Camel" :lol: It's mean, I know :slinkaway but he's gotta know that not everyone watching would know that a camel is the name of a spin!

PEKINGMOO
02-19-2011, 06:12 PM
Darts, I think. Probably horseshoes.

The problem with comparing in most sports is that the fundamental equipment has changed so very much. Gymnastics is hardly the same sport that it was in 1950; the equipment for women is tremendously different: sprung floors, fiberglass poles on uneven bars rather than solid wood, and the bars themselves are far further apart than in 1950. The vaulting horse is now a table. Balance beams are now padded and sueded, rather than being the polished wood that they were in my youth.

True. Nadia Comaneci was capable of doing a double back on a hard, spring-less floor covered only by a thin mat (1976 American Cup) - which IMO requires a completely different technique of propelling your body into the air compared with what is required on today's overly sprung floors.




As for skating, I'm old enough to remember how figure skates were constructed in the 50s and 60s. There was very little support, so the stress on the ankles and shins was probably 100% more than it is today. The landing had to be very precise for the skater to support it and come out with some flow. It's not that the skaters didn't have the physical ability to jump higher and get more rotations, it's that the equipment worked best when the jump was more "out" than "up", lessening the stress on landing.

^^^ This! With skating, the boots and blades have changed in ways that facilitate landing triples & quads, but I believe inhibit things like toe point, certain positions, and some deep edges we see from past skaters.

Equipment changes do change technique.

falling_dance
02-19-2011, 06:24 PM
very bland choreography

No program can be that bland which concludes with a spin to indicate that the program symphony's "hero" has just died by guillotine.

Aceon6
02-19-2011, 06:48 PM
Another thing I notice is that the skaters from those days all do beautiful leaning straight legged spread eagles. So gorgeous. No butt eagles or flat up and down positions with bent knees. Apart from Cassar, Wylie, Boitano and a few others, 1961 spread eagles were much more beautiful than modern day ones.

I also loved the pivot and reverse spread eagle combinations of Bradley Lord - perhaps it is simple as opposed to today's footwork, but sometimes less is more.

Boots again. I could do spread eagles easily in the old style boots. When I started skating again in modern boots, I couldn't move my foot and ankle enough in the boot to get the right angles.

Lainerb
02-19-2011, 07:18 PM
Ultra distance running perhaps? I am not talking about marathons here, but rather any distance 50 miles plus.

MR-FAN
02-19-2011, 07:19 PM
No program can be that bland which concludes with a spin to indicate that the program symphony's "hero" has just died by guillotine.

Fair enough, lets just call it "kinda bland" ;)

falling_dance
02-19-2011, 08:00 PM
Fair enough, lets just call it "kinda bland" ;)

OK. :D

Bland or not, I still enjoyed that performance, which I say as someone who doesn't much care for old school ladies' skating.

millyskate
02-19-2011, 09:36 PM
The Jump categories in athletics really don't improve consistently over time... it's more a matter of when an exceptional athlete turns up. Bob Beamon's 8,90 is rarely matched today.

pat c
02-19-2011, 11:20 PM
Horse racing, steeple and flat.

Discus? Javelin? wrestling?