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Karina1974
02-17-2011, 05:22 PM
I suspect that your employer does not want the handbook quoted word for word on an internet forum. I realize that it seems a bit anonymous, but still.


The nice thing about where I work is that they don't give a shit about things that would have most other places spazzing (our IT person has better things to do than to snoop around on peoples' server log-ons to see if we are getting online, for example). And it's not like I'm badmouthing my employer either; actually, what I am saying about them makes them look head and shoulders over other companies whose time off policies are more draconian. :)


I can't wrap my head around harassing someone on chemo treatment.

I can't either, and that would be unheard of where I work. We're like one huge (slightly) disfunctional family. When someone has a death in their family, you can count on the president and several managers/co-workers showing up at the wake.

Twilight1
02-17-2011, 05:31 PM
It just makes me sad that we are so product driven that our general health has to be sacrificed. Studies show if the mental and emotional health of employees are addressed by employers, the productivity of the business goes up. You beat them...they will break.

I frequently take days off without pay. I need it for my sanity and to address issues with my one son/ or dad. If I didn't I would be burned out. Luckily, my husband makes a real good income that I can afford one shift off a pay period.

Anita18
02-17-2011, 05:46 PM
I can't wrap my head around harassing someone on chemo treatment. ITA with antmanb that would lead to a lawsuit (or should be)

My dad is knocked on his butt when he gets his chemo. He can't eat, he can't sleep, he is nauseous etc etc. He can barely get out of bed some days.
I know! That's horrible, and definitely a case where a big fat lawsuit is entirely warranted!


But an employment situation is very different from an academic, lab situation. Whether you get sick leave or vacation or whatever is completely dependent on the lab professor you work for. Luckily for Anita, her PI is very lenient.

Personally, for Anita's case, I think the reason why that person did not take stay at home was simply stress and work pressure. Cells don't stop dividing and mice don't stop breeding just because you're sick. And when you're not working and staying home, people both 2 floors up from you and halfway around the globe are busy thinking and working on the same ideas and experiments you are doing. If you don't work, you won't publish. And if you don't publish, you won't graduate.
Frankly if the grad student wanted to be as high-achieving as you say, she wouldn't have had two kids. :P Not to mention she's already missing a lot of lab time because she's only first year - most grad students here don't get settled into their lab until second year (kids or no kids) just because of the coursework.

Plus we're a VERY small lab, and my boss tries to work on experiments that nobody else is working on because he doesn't like direct competition. :)

That one week where she insisted on coming in while dangerously sick, she did one experiment. It was a multi-day experiment, but it was still only one and she could have easily delayed it because of the stuff I already pointed out.

Yes, competition and the urge to get ahead convinces some people to endanger their health and the health of others (she had PNEUMONIA for Christ's sake, diagnosed by a doctor and everything, and she refused to take antibiotics because she's still breastfeeding), but in some cases I don't think it's worth it. It's certainly worth considering, but doesn't mean I can't disapprove of their choice. :P

MacMadame
02-20-2011, 10:16 PM
Not to mention she's already missing a lot of lab time because she's only first year
Well, there's your reason for why she came in... she probably felt like she couldn't afford to not come in given the other time she missed.


That one week where she insisted on coming in while dangerously sick, she did one experiment. It was a multi-day experiment, but it was still only one and she could have easily delayed it because of the stuff I already pointed out.
Yes, but I'm sure when she came in, she thought it would go differently. I'm not saying what she did was smart but I do find it understandable.

Gazpacho
02-20-2011, 11:35 PM
This would be completely illegal in the UK and the company would find itself on the end of an enormous law suit.There are a lot of cases where employers do illegal or arguably illegal things. But they don't care because they know the chances of being sued are negligible. What are the chances of an employee with few resources taking on a company's legal department?

Prancer
02-20-2011, 11:46 PM
Yes, competition and the urge to get ahead convinces some people to endanger their health and the health of others (she had PNEUMONIA for Christ's sake, diagnosed by a doctor and everything, and she refused to take antibiotics because she's still breastfeeding)

I've worked while having pneumonia before, diagnosed by a doctor and everything. While I haven't felt well, I haven't felt like I just couldn't get out of bed, either; the biggest problem is the cough, which may or may not be painful, and I feel tired. I usually don't run a fever; if I do, it's never high.

I have never given pneumonia to anyone, at least not that I know of. My own family doesn't catch it, my students don't catch it, none of my friends catch it--I don't know who else I would give it to, but my understanding is that it's not that easy to catch. You pretty much have to have a suppressed immune system to get it; most people get pneumonia after they've had some other respiratory infection.

There's pneumonia and there's pneumonia. Most of it won't kill you or even make you all that sick. If you've got the kind that WILL kill you, you don't get up and go running around with it.

centerstage01
02-20-2011, 11:50 PM
It just makes me sad that we are so product driven that our general health has to be sacrificed. Studies show if the mental and emotional health of employees are addressed by employers, the productivity of the business goes up. You beat them...they will break.


I agree with you, but unfortunately, there are some people that totally abuse the system. If someone is genuinely sick or takes a "mental health day" every now and then, I have no problem with it. But I worked with one guy that it seemed like he called in sick all the freaking time. He used up his sick days, his personal days, and his vacation days and still called out. He was asked if he had some serious underlying problem that no one knew about (everyone was really concerned) and his response was no, he just didn't want to come in.

I can't say we were too sad when he quit.