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Karina1974
02-16-2011, 03:21 AM
So I will ask a question.

How many people here actually get sick leave? If you do how many days do you get? And can you accumulate them each year?



Well, "sick leave" at my job is handled differently than at most places. Our sick leave is actually called "Long Term Sick Leave", which is just that - it is only to be used for long-term, serious illnesses, or to care for a family member who has a serious, long-term illness. One of our sales people has a heart condition, and he went out 2 weeks ago as a result of it (I think he is actually supposed to be having surgery at some point soon) for an indifinite amount of time. That would be an example of someone allowed to use Long Term Sick time for his absence. It is NOT allowed for someone who is just out for 2 days with a stomach bug or really bad PMS (I've been known to take time off for that on occasion).

Every year on our hire date anniversary, we get 40 hours of Sick Time. I think it goes up to 6 weeks-worth. I believe that, once the Sick Time is all used up, the employee goes on disability.

For "mild" illnesses, we are expected to use our Vacation Time, which accrues weekly, or our Personal Time.

Vacation Time accrues on a weekly basis, and how much you get depends on how long you've been an employee. Less than 1 year - .77 hours/week, 1-8 years - 1.85/week, and 9+ years - 2.77 hours/week. This coming June, I will start getting 2.77 hours per week. We are allowed to accrue up to 200 hours, and we are capped after that, but considering that 2.77 gives you 1 whole day off every month, that is still very generous.

Especially when you also factor in the Personal Time. We get 40 hours of Personal Time on July 1 every year. PT is "use it or lose it" - you don't carry over any unused PT hours past 365 days.

The reason Vacation time gets capped is because when you leave the company for any reason (even getting fired) you get paid for unused Vacation time. I'm up to 184 hours so, if I left tomorrow, I'd have almost 5 weeks-worth of pay coming to me. Personal and Sick, OTOH, we don't get paid for unused time when we leave.

Vacation and Personal Time can be used for any reason; in fact, we are expected to use up our Personal Time before we are allowed to start using our Long-Term Sick Time, which is no big deal anyway, since we'll be getting 40 more PT hours come next July 1.

As I see it, my employer is very, very fair and generous with their time off policies. We don't need to give reasons for getting time off, we only have to ask for it, provided that extended time off (like a week or 2 weeks) be given with far enough advance notice that the fill-in people know and thus will be prepared for the extra work.

MacMadame
02-16-2011, 04:14 AM
I get 15 days of vacation and 10 days of sick leave and 3 floating holidays a year. I can accrue 8 weeks of vacation and 4 weeks of sick leave. Floating holidays have to be taken that calendar year. I can't take sick leave or floating holidays with me if I quit or get fired.

Vacation days can be cashed out. I can even cash them out when I take vacation. Since my dh only gets 1 week of vacation a year, every time we go on vacation I take an equal number of days in cash -- it often pays for the vacation!

As for coming in sick, in my group a lot of people work at home anyway. So, when they are sick but not that sick, they work from home. If they get sicker, they turn it into a sick day.

myhoneyhoney
02-16-2011, 04:19 AM
If only it was that easy.

Exactly. If my husband's employees stayed home every time they were sick then guess what, regional managers will start grilling my husband and he could potentially lose his job.

Anita18
02-16-2011, 04:21 AM
Anita18, was your supervisor there? If so, s/he should have said something.
Unfortunately the week that the first grad student came in with pneumonia, my boss was actually out of state at a conference. :o (Which is why my sleep schedule was a$$ backwards - nobody was around to pretend I had normal working hours for. :lol: )

I'm sure if he saw her, he would have told her to go home. :( That one time where I was flattened by PMS (cramps, chills, sweating, I was probably pale as a sheet) he took one look at me and said I should go home, I looked that bad. :o

Gazpacho
02-16-2011, 05:44 AM
If only it was that easy. :( We are so short staffed that I have to watch that we have enough licensed staff around to meet legal minimum requirements. I do encourage my staff to stay home when ill, but everyone knows what a huge hardship this places on everyone else. I had to spend two days last week and two days this week at my second site, covering for sick staff. I got absolutely none of my own work done. If only we had the option of hiring more staff. :(


Exactly. If my husband's employees stayed home every time they were sick then guess what, regional managers will start grilling my husband and he could potentially lose his job.Wow, I was really ignorant. I've always been the staff member being supervised and never the supervisor!

Thanks for shedding light on how complex this all is.

Veronika
02-16-2011, 04:54 PM
I'm a supervisor on my better days, and I have to say that the problem with sick leave is that people abuse it. Either they aren't that sick, or not sick at all--and they ruin it for everyone else who is honest.

I once had an employee tell me that she "thought" she had a headache and had to go home. I'm not kidding.

For myself--I only call in sick if I have a fever. If I have a cold, I can usually just tough it out. I usually only take 1 sick day a year, if that.

MarieM
02-16-2011, 05:03 PM
I'd rather say that in France, people abuse sick leave a lot. And I'm 100% sure that a lot of really sick people just tough it up because they want to go further.
You just have to be careful not to be controlled at home and present zero symptoms. And I can't remember the exact amount of time you can take without loosing some income, maybe 15 days ?

jadingirl
02-16-2011, 05:14 PM
I've been at my current job for 9 years and get 4 weeks vacation, 3 personal days and 8 medical days for doctor, dentist etc.

As well I am lucky as I get accumulated sick days here so I currently have over 100. However, I think I have maybe used 3 days a year if that as I usually get a cold once a year and usually I am too busy in the lab with an experiment and have to go in anyways.

Anita18
02-16-2011, 06:22 PM
I'm a supervisor on my better days, and I have to say that the problem with sick leave is that people abuse it. Either they aren't that sick, or not sick at all--and they ruin it for everyone else who is honest.
My sister once called in a sick day because she wanted to run errands. :o That was because she wanted to save her vacation days, she's usually a very hard worker. Once she was telecommuting and she billed for 23 hours straight of work. She ate by the computer and didn't leave unless it was to go to the bathroom. :lol: Knowing her, I find this believable. :o

genegri
02-16-2011, 08:28 PM
I work for a pharma company, going on 3 years now. I have 15 vacation days and 3 personal days, unlimited sick days (but no more than 5 consecutive days at a time) and up to 24 months of paid leave. Some people, mostly those with young children, work from home 5 days a week unless there is a big team meeting.

I am lucky that people on my team appreciate the perk and do not abuse it.

A young woman on my team was pregnant and worked from home during the 13 weeks. And she was WORKING, not laying around. She was answering emails literally on her way into the delivery room. Her last text message to me was: "I need to go in now. Talk to you later. Will send a picture." One hour later, I received a picture of her new born. Having people with work ethic like that, I really don't care if they work from home or from wherever.

Early last year my mother was gravely ill and I was off work for 5 weeks. The proper procedure should have been that I would take family leave with 75% pay. My manager and I worked it out that if I was not to take any vaction days for the rest of the year, I would not have to officially take the leave. And it worked out just fine. Less paper work for him and 100% pay for me.

Family friendly policy, supportive management and people with proven track records make a great combination.

genevieve
02-16-2011, 08:31 PM
Family friendly policy, supportive management and people with proven track records make a great combination.
I agree with this, although the definition of these policies etc are scalable.

IME, the people who do take advantage of leave policies tend to be noticed, and even if others think they're 'getting away with it', it will often affect their ability to get raises, promotions, and other opportunities in the workplace.

Allen
02-16-2011, 08:59 PM
I had a student come to my office to tell me that she had the flu and she wouldn't be back to class until Tuesday. Why in the hell did she have to come to my office? I told her next time an email would suffice, which seemed to offend her. You can better believe I broke out the lysol and sanitizing wipes the second her butt cleared the plane of my door.

milanessa
02-16-2011, 09:10 PM
As I see it, my employer is very, very fair and generous with their time off policies. We don't need to give reasons for getting time off, we only have to ask for it, provided that extended time off (like a week or 2 weeks) be given with far enough advance notice that the fill-in people know and thus will be prepared for the extra work.

That does sound fair and generous. Did the union have any part to play in that policy?

Karina1974
02-16-2011, 09:25 PM
I'm a supervisor on my better days, and I have to say that the problem with sick leave is that people abuse it. Either they aren't that sick, or not sick at all--and they ruin it for everyone else who is honest.


Therefore, by extension, the real problem is the employer not growing a pair and setting down rules for sick time usage. If I or one of my co-workers has to use Sick Time, we have to prove why it is necessary to use it, by providing medical documentation to our supervisors and to HR, and we have to use up our Personal Time first before reverting to using Sick Time hours. Like I said in my first post, Sick Time where I work is strictly limited to long-term serious illnesses.

Here's something I just looked up that is mindblowing to me, personally: between my Vacation, Personal and Sick Time, I have a whopping 485.59 hours (12 weeks) of Paid Time banked at my job.

Karina1974
02-16-2011, 09:42 PM
That does sound fair and generous. Did the union have any part to play in that policy?

I wouldn't know... we are a non-union shop, and have been for far longer than I have been working there, and I've been there since 2002. The union they did have way back when was busted sometime in the 1970's or 1980's. The warehouse workers (and we still have some former union guys working out there), however, still are paid based on how union jobs are paid in regards to OT being based on the workday hours rather than on the workweek hours.