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Gypsy
02-15-2011, 03:02 PM
I "earn" 4 hours of sick leave per every pay period (8 hrs a month), but since I work for a government office, you are expected not to use your sick time. After all it is taxpayer money. (This is a very frustrating statement to me because most people forget that government workers pay taxes too.)
So, I feel very guilty when I have to call in sick.

numbers123
02-15-2011, 03:18 PM
My son started a new job yesterday. Mostly HR/policies orientation. He was trying to understand the paid time off policies and ask about illnesses/sick days. He was told - just don't be sick or call in sick. JUST DON'T GET SICK OR CALL IN SICK.

antmanb
02-15-2011, 04:23 PM
I'm in the UK and started my current job last year and it is the worst place i've worked in terms of holidays (but the best place in every other way!).

I get 20 days paid annual leave per year (Jan-Dec) (plus the 8 bank holidays we have in the UK). I also accrue one extra day per full calendar year I work up to a maximum of 5 extra days. So after 5 years I'll be up to (the more standard for my industry of) 25 days paid holiday.

Sick days are separate from holidays and are all on full pay, I think for the first year it's 10 days, and then increases with time up to a maximum of 30 days. There is some employment law cases out there to suggest that if you are sick when you take a holiday you should be entitled to get the holiday back as you were actually sick.

You are allowed a "reasonable" amount of time off for medical appointments, dentist etc without having to make up the hours.

There are various policies in place regarding time off for bereavement on full pay, depending on the relation of the person etc it can be up to a week with full pay.

I think UK employment law has gone a long way to protect employees.

Ant

Habs
02-15-2011, 05:23 PM
I made my husband stay home from work today. He woke up with a fever, chills and a bad cough but insisted he was okay to go into the office. :rolleyes:

A few of my co-workers have been in and out this week with the same symptoms. Count me in as one who wishes sick colleagues would stay home.

At my current job have 15 sick days/year to use with no loss of pay (I also have three weeks vacation time and work on a flex program where I have every second Friday off). Sick days and vacation days both carry over, so I'm quite lucky that way.

Mozart
02-15-2011, 05:24 PM
I get 0 sick days, 0 personal days and 0 vacation days. If I am not at work I don't get paid. That includes sow days. We have had 6 1/2 so far so my bank account is suffering A LOT

acraven
02-15-2011, 05:26 PM
US federal goverment allows (for most employees):

13 days of sick leave per year. Accrues without limit. Employees under the old retirement system (pre-1983) get pension credit for their unused sick leave, which can increase their pensions by up to 5% or a bit more. Newer employees get half-time credit, I think (new policy, because they finally figured out that a lot of folks were getting "sick" very frequently in the last year before they retired).

13 days of annual leave (vacation) initially, increasing to 20 days after 3 years and to 26 days after 15 years. I believe the standard carryover limit is 30 days, but this figure can be higher in some cases. Unused annual leave is cashed out when you resign or retire. If there are any federal holidays falling within that cashed-out period, retirees get paid for them as well.

10 paid holidays per year.

There can be some variation at individual agencies. For example, the Postal Service allows salaried personnel to take up to 4 hours off without being charged leave; this is very helpful for medical check-ups, funerals, and the like. But there's no overtime or compensatory time if salaried USPS employees work more than 40 hours a week.

Prancer
02-15-2011, 05:27 PM
I'm a preschool teacher and do you know how many times I have been sick this year because parents send their kids in coughing and sneezing? I had one poor child vomit from coughing so much and because he didn't have a fever, we couldn't send him home. Love it (sarcastic here) when parents fill their kids with tylenol to lower a fever so they can get a few hours of work in until the fever returns and they have to pick their kid up. We always know because the kids tell us mommy gave them the red medicine for a fever.

I do know this happens a lot; I volunteered in the elementary school clinic for years and saw this all the time. It is infuriating.

But finding a sitter for a sick child is almost impossible, and employers tend to be much more understanding of the sick child problem when the school calls and says that the child is sick that they do when the parents call and say that their child is sick. When you have kids and you miss work because of them, there is often a lot of resentment from your co-workers who have to cover you, and using your leave to take care of them means you don't have any yourself if you catch what they have. And some managers couldn't care less if your kids are sick; you have to go in, anyway.

So they send their kids in sick, which makes their kids miserable and the other kids sick.

I never had to make choices like that, but I have some compassion for the parents who do (as opposed to the parents who have lots of sick leave and could easily take time off, but don't want to deal with their sick kids--and yes, I met a few of those, too).

Rex
02-15-2011, 05:33 PM
When I was sick a couple of weeks ago, I came in thinking that I was better. But I was not so, I took the next day off. I had to come in that Friday - no one else is trained to get the newsletter out. But then I wiped my phone and computer down, and came home early. I was so out of it that I got some of the dates wrong on the watchbill and calendar :). I spent that entire weekend in bed. If you are sick, stay home. I have learned my lesson.

GarrAarghHrumph
02-15-2011, 06:41 PM
I get 0 sick days, 0 personal days and 0 vacation days. If I am not at work I don't get paid. That includes sow days...

You don't get any days off to deal with your pigs? ;)

Anita18
02-15-2011, 07:10 PM
This is the first job I've had that actually gives me vacation/sick days/benefits. It's really hard to take time off when you don't have pto. If I can work, I need the money (that said, most of my sick days are usually migraines where physically I can't do anything but lay around in a dark room)...
Yeah that really sucks. :( Another of my coworkers gets sick all the time, not only colds but really bad migraines. She sometimes finds a way to get to work but not always. (If it's a migraine, she buckles down and tries to feel better, then goes to work later in the day. My boss is fairly lenient about scheduling too. It's probably why we're still fairly productive despite being a really small group. :lol: )

But she's a really smart, productive person when she IS here - she's achieved more in a shorter time than most grad students even with all of her hours off and her recurring migraines. And we work in a place where it's impossible to telecommute. I don't get why more employers don't make it possible to telecommute when it's possible for your job. When I was out for a week with the stomach flu, I couldn't get up and walk around, but I could still read and do computer work. (I got a lot of reading done that week. :lol: ) Employers forcing sick people to come in for stuff they could do at home is just stupid. Then again I've heard a lot of really stupid things going down for the sake of "looking productive," even in a scientific lab setting where supplies are not cheap. :o

Mozart
02-15-2011, 07:14 PM
sorry snow days ;)

Susan M
02-15-2011, 07:17 PM
Luckily we have a boss who's understanding of this - if you're sick

As a supervisor, I actually sent people home sick on more than one occasion. I think people are just dedicated, trying to be responsible about their work duties, or maybe that they would feel like slackers to stay home. Once I tell them they needed to be in bed, they were happy to go. (All my employees get sick pay.)

Badams
02-15-2011, 07:34 PM
I also wish people would stay home when sick and keep their sick kids at home. I always worry about who people are taking my germs or my child's germs home to. Like sick parents, grandparents, siblings etc... You just never know what someone's home situation is like. I keep my kids home as son as i notice they are coming down with something. It's easy for me though, since I am always home. I feel bad for those who have to work and can't take sick time fr themselves, let alone sick kids. :(

skatingfan5
02-15-2011, 07:36 PM
US federal goverment allows (for most employees):

13 days of sick leave per year. Accrues without limit.

13 days of annual leave (vacation) initially, increasing to 20 days after 3 years and to 26 days after 15 years. I believe the standard carryover limit is 30 days, but this figure can be higher in some cases. Unused annual leave is cashed out when you resign or retire. If there are any federal holidays falling within that cashed-out period, retirees get paid for them as well.

10 paid holidays per year.This is very similar to what my state offers (I work for a state university):

12 days of sick leave per year; accrues without limit. Faculty get up to an additional 13 days per year that does not accrue. (I guess they are all half as healthy as the administrative and service staff. :rolleyes:) Fortunately I seem to have been pretty healthy the past decade or so, as I've accumulated over 100 days of sick leave. I remember when I barely had a week's worth.

10 days of vacation per year to start; increases with longevity (at 3 year intervals) up to max of 25 days; faculty begin at that limit. Accrues to whatever is double one's annual limit (i.e. 50 days at max).

14 paid holidays per year (2 are undesignated "floating holidays" which the employee can use whenever they choose).

Paid funeral leave of up to 3 days for immediate family; 1 day for other family members. Paid leave if on jury duty.

It's fairly generous if you have worked for more than a year or two and don't have small children or a family member with serious on-going health issues. There is a "sick leave bank" that I try to remember to contribute to, but they have really restricted access to this (due to abuse by some for cosmetic surgery procedures. :mad:)

Anita18
02-15-2011, 07:38 PM
As a supervisor, I actually sent people home sick on more than one occasion. I think people are just dedicated, trying to be responsible about their work duties, or maybe that they would feel like slackers to stay home. Once I tell them they needed to be in bed, they were happy to go. (All my employees get sick pay.)
What's interesting is that when I decide that I feel too bad to come into work (I rarely get anything that's contagious, it's usually menstrual cramps or my digestive system), at that moment where I make the decision, my body immediately seems to give up and take a nosedive.

I wonder how many of these sick people are telling themselves that they really are okay and that only the conviction is actually keeping them functioning. :lol:

This doesn't apply to contagious nasties though. I'd stay home for that!

But really, if I'm on the cusp of feeling terrible, being at work when it really gets bad is the most hopeless feeling ever. I had a terrible reaction to my own hormones once during the work day - dizziness, nausea, chills, was seeing stars - and I felt like I was never ever ever going to get myself home. My boss took one look at me and said I should go, and to this day I have no idea how I walked to the parking lot (takes 10 minutes) and drove home without any incident. :lol: I literally felt like I could not see.