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mikey
01-25-2011, 02:38 AM
What do you think about a dentist writing a prescription for a Z-pack for a friend with upper respiratory symptoms?

agalisgv
01-25-2011, 02:52 AM
Why didn't the friend just get a script from their regular doctor?

Kasey
01-25-2011, 03:07 AM
I thought technically, if the doctor/dentist in question hasn't been seeng the person as a patient (i.e., having an established file on them), it's a no-go. Which is why we can't just ask the hospitalist or ER doc for an antibiotic script without officially being seen.

mikey
01-25-2011, 03:07 AM
Why didn't the friend just get a script from their regular doctor?convenient and free

mikey
01-25-2011, 03:09 AM
I thought technically, if the doctor/dentist in question hasn't been seeng the person as a patient (i.e., having an established file on them), it's a no-go.that's my understanding too

ryanbfan
01-25-2011, 03:54 AM
Z-packs suck and do not work for me.

I went to the doctor the other day and unfortunately had to see someone I do not always see, she tried to give me one and I told her they do not make me feel any better and usually I feel no different after taking them. She got frustrated with me. Whatevs.

BigB08822
01-25-2011, 04:15 AM
I see absolutely no problem with it. It's a Z Pack for crying out loud, not a month supply of narcotics. Is it supposed to be done that way, no, but come on. I don't think anyone will be getting hurt. I am sure the dentist asked the proper questions to make sure they aren't taking other medications that may interfere, allergies, etc.

Prancer
01-25-2011, 04:24 AM
Is it supposed to be done that way, no,

Then it is unethical--which is not the same thing as illegal or immoral

I would call it unethical because the friend isn't a patient. I have had doctors give me scripts without seeing me--often for Z-packs--but only those doctors who have been treating me a long time and know me well as a patient.

taf2002
01-25-2011, 04:24 AM
Dentists give antibiotics for abcesses so it's not like they are completely untrained to do so. The problem is that the patient may have something other than an upper respiratory problem & may need to see a doctor.

BigB08822
01-25-2011, 04:26 AM
Well then there is no point in this thread as we all know it is unethical (by definition) but the OP asked our opinion and I gave mine. ;)

Prancer
01-25-2011, 04:28 AM
Well then there is no point in this thread as we all know it is unethical (by definition)

I don't know if that's actually true, though. For example, I know a doctor who writes scrips for his daughter. I had always thought that was unethical, but he insists that it isn't.

vesperholly
01-25-2011, 04:47 AM
What a coincidence. I have been sicky lately and I was just thinking about how I could get my doctor to prescribe a z-pack ($15 copay that I can use my flex spending on) without first paying the $40 out-of-pocket cost for an office visit.

I promise I didn't ask my dentist for it, though :)

numbers123
01-25-2011, 04:50 AM
mikey - I happen to believe that it is unethical. If he had been seeing the friend as a client then it be appropriate.

But if the friend called the dentist friend and said - hey I have a sinus problem, Z-pak has worked in the past and my regular doctor is out of town or unavailable, then that is not appropriate.

Not only unethical, but dangerous. If you don't have all the information/assessment of the client and you do prescribe the wrong thing..And as a dentist, he should not be treating anything other than tooth abcesses, etc.

Michalle
01-25-2011, 05:26 AM
What is a Z-pack?

vesperholly
01-25-2011, 05:51 AM
A commonly-prescribed 5-day regimen of Azithromycin, marketed in the US as Zithromax.