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Fashionista
02-24-2011, 09:41 AM
I wouldn't call any of those cases worse. The N. Korean government starves out their own people while they are building these weapons.
First I don't see how starving out own people is worse than bomb and kill others.
Second are we sure North Korean people are being starved out? In fact we have no idea what is going there and how they live. What we see on TV about them could be another governmental propaganda.

TAHbKA
02-24-2011, 10:28 AM
So Japan, NKorea, Czech Republic... any other countries that should be discussed in `From Russia with love'?!

allezfred
02-24-2011, 11:18 AM
So Japan, NKorea, Czech Republic... any other countries that should be discussed in `From Russia with love'?!

Barbados! :summer:

Macassar88
02-24-2011, 11:24 AM
I'm relatively unfamiliar with current Russia figure skating outside of pairs, but I'm interested. Who are the upcoming Russian single skating stars? Are there any who can start challenging for world medals and possibly olympic medals?

Hedwig
02-24-2011, 11:40 AM
I'm relatively unfamiliar with current Russia figure skating outside of pairs, but I'm interested. Who are the upcoming Russian single skating stars? Are there any who can start challenging for world medals and possibly olympic medals?

In ladies definitely. There are about 10 junior ladies right now who could challenge for future world and olympic medals.
And in ice-dance there is the couple Ilynikh/Katsalapov which is expected to dominate ice-dance in a few years.
Just men is a bit of a blind spot right now. I thought Artem Grigoriev was their biggest chance in men but he has sooo many injury problems that he hardly ever appeared on the scene.

cholla
02-24-2011, 11:43 AM
Cholla, I definitely was not accusing you of spreading propaganda, and I definitely was not insulting you.

Sorry if I misinterpreted you but it definitely looked a lot like you were answering my post and attacking me. Quoting someone then starting with "it's total propaganda from an extremely oppressive regime" can hardly not look like a direct answer and attack before you explain your special way of posting. Sorry also I hadn't noticed this specificity from you before but there is a whole lot of people on this board and it's not possible to keep track of everyone and everything. And no, I'm not being sarcastic, I usually try to pay as much attention as I can to what everyone says. Now time for me to move on too ;)

TAHbKA
02-24-2011, 12:17 PM
Interview with Martusheva/Rogonov
We want to leave all the failures behind (http://www.championat.ru/other/_skating/article-78749.html) Nadezhda Baranova for Championat.ru


Anastasia Martusheva and Alexey Rogonov, the 2009 world junior silver medalists admit the international competitions come easier for them than the nationals. Indeed, this season they won the `Golden Spin of Zagreb' while being only 9th at the Russian nationals. This week they get another chance to skate home at the Russia Cup final in Yoshkar Ola. They were interviewed several days before the competition.

AB: My first question is quite standard - when did you start skating?
Martusheva: I started at the age of 6 in Perm. Well, 5 and half, though closer to 6. First I was a single skater but then a pairs coach took me to her group. I like the pair skating better especially the lifts.

(Martusheva was born at 17/3/95 in Perm, Rogonov was born in 6/6/1988 in Salsk. They are Russian junior champions and world junior silver medalists of 2009)

Rogonov: I also started skating at the age of 6. My mom took me to the rink. I am from Achinsk - it's a small town in Krasnodar. For the first 10 years I skated on the open rink - there was no artificial ice. But our coach - Gennadii Petrov was a huge fan of the sport. He really wanted the kids in our town to skate. So we did - at the winter when sometimes it went as low as -40C. We didn't have to go to school, but we skated. At the age of 13 I won the Siberia/Far East championship and went to a bigger competition where... I realzied that in my age group I'm nowhere near the others. I was spottet at that competition and moved to Perm, where I started skating in a pair.

Baravona: I can't help recalling the Europeans in Bern where many skaters complained it was cold. When skating outside on an open rink you can't really show any results.
Rogonov: Obviously. First of all because there was no artificial ice we could only do other things over the summer: we ran, played football, sometimes went hicking. The worked on our jumps on the floor. We skated for as long as the winter lasted - 5 months a year at the best case. Of course we had to dress differently - another pair of trousers, pullovers - all that limited the movement and the triple jumps were hard to do. And we were constantly cold. When it's -30 outside you might be able to skate for half an hour at the most but then you'd have to stop and defrost before continuing.

Baranova: Hard training makes the easy fight?
Rogonov: When I moved to Perm I thought it was the best ice ever. It wasn't breaking like the overfrozen open air rink. I thought it was ideal. I skated in Ludmila Kalinina group for two years, changing four partners. Anastasia was the last one. We then moved with her to Moscow.

Baranova: Anastasia, who was your first partner on the ice?
Martusheva: I started skating with Sasha Lubnin. But it was just a beginning. We did the easiest things - double jumps, lifts on two arms. Even the kids on their first championships don't do that stuff anymore. Then Ludmila Alexandrovna (Kalinina) paired Alexey and I.
Rogonov: It just happened that I was skating alone for a while. Anastasia had just learned all the elements and it was decided to let us tryout. It seemed to work fine. Later when Natalia Pavlova started to form a group she invited us to Moscow. We skated in Moscow for another year - were just learning to skate with each other. A year later we started working on the programmes.

Baranova: You have a huge age difference. Because of that you could only skate one season in the juniors.
Rogonov: Yes, indeed, we could do so much more if it wasn't for my age.
Martusheva: but it all started with my age when I couldnt' participate the junior worlds.
Rogonov: anyway, our junior time flew quite fast. Nothing you can do about.

Baranova: When you were just paired did you take than into a consideration?
Rogonov: we didn't think much of the results back then. We set small goals: learn the elements. It went fine on the juniors level. On the seniors we are still not quite where we would like to be.

Baranov: perhaps it is due to the fast switch? You were just starting skating as the juniors really.
Rogonov: That's true, we were just starting to get used to the international competitions. It was really interesting - not like skating in Russia where you know everyone - suddenly we were surrounded by strangers and you have to show what you can do and see what the others are doing.
The hardest thing in the switch (from the juniors to the seniors) is taht it's not yet over.

Baranova: It must be even harder for Anastasia - age wise she would skate in the juniors for quite a while.
Martusheva: Guess I lack the experience. Of course am slowly getting used to the senior programes. But it's very different indeed. Previously I would compete with the skaters of my age group but now when we get to a competition I'm usually the youngest. I am now 15y.o., when we switched I was 14. My competitors were in their 20s. Though Alexey says it doesn't matter who old you are it matters to me.

Baranova: How do you get along? Do you mind the age gap?
Rogonov: No, it's allright. We have a brother/sister relationship. Though even now it happens that we speak as if in different languages. I'm saying one thing, Anastasia another but at the end we figure we were saying the same things but in different words.

Baranova: indeed sounds like a brother/sister relationship
Martusheva: It happen that we argue, but we keep working.
Rogonov: The goal is the same.

Baranova: There are just a couple of days left till the next competition. Do you train more now than before?
Martusheva: We had a New Year break after the nationals and now we are heading to the last competition of the season. So yes, we are getting ready!
Rogonov: the trainings are short but very intense. We go on the ice for just 45 minutes or an hour, but we do all the work - the run through, the transitions, the elements. We work on the things that didn't really go well during the season, especially the jumps. I have a feeling we are in a good shape and we should do well.

Baranova: the season is about to end. Did you start thinking of the next?
Rogonov: Sure. New programmes, harder elements. We learned another throw - the 3f. I'm eager to perform that at the competition even now, but it was decided we'll only include it starting next season. I wish we had less failures in the future. During the last two seasons our results were far from the desired.

Baranova: Because of the switch?
Rogonov: The switch, the grow....
Martusheva: In the last four years I grew 13-14sm. But in the last year I didn't gain any high.

Baranova: so now you can work and develop! What are your goals?
Martusheva: First of all the nationals. It's the most important competition for us which defines whether we'll be in the team, hence go to the Europeans and the Worlds.
Rogonov: It just seems that right now it's easier for us to skate at the international competitions rather than home. So our main goal now is to show we are a decent pair at the nationals.

easilydistracte
02-24-2011, 02:18 PM
So Japan, NKorea, Czech Republic... any other countries that should be discussed in `From Russia with love'?!
Thanks, TAHbKA. [Perhaps the discussion could be moved to either the Off the Beaten Track or Politically Incorrect forum categories.]

let`s talk
02-24-2011, 02:30 PM
NO WAY !!!! :mad: :mad: :mad:



nice young boy here (baby Gachi? even better?) :) :
www.youtube.com/watch?v=TeFG2iWb5rY

Squibble
02-24-2011, 03:09 PM
I feel strange.Western country always said Sport shouldn't relate with Political,but blame skaters this time.

It's just skating.why all the people wast time on talking about Political things?

Because the Paektusan Festival is political. It is a glorification of a repressive dictator.

I'm sure that if there had been a skating exhibition organized in the U.S. a few years ago to pay tribute to George W. Bush and "liberation" of Iraq, there would have been a bigger outcry than there is over Paektusan.

By the way, don't skaters like Verner and Pechalat & Bourzat have agents who are supposed to help them make decisions about things like this and avoid any unfavorable publicity?

Andrey aka Pushkin
02-24-2011, 05:14 PM
Martyusheva/Rogonov didn't split up yet? :eek:

Re: NK - I'd go. Sounds like the only way ever to visit this country.

rfisher
02-24-2011, 05:46 PM
Martyusheva/Rogonov didn't split up yet? :eek:

Re: NK - I'd go. Sounds like the only way ever to visit this country.

Maybe he can skate with Moody Maria. :saint:

Asli
02-24-2011, 06:19 PM
I'm still expecting Moody Maria and Jinxed Jérôme to find a way to continue skating together.

loopey
02-24-2011, 06:28 PM
I'm still expecting Moody Maria and Jinxed Jérôme to find a way to continue skating together.

When I first heard they were taking a "time-out", I too thought they would resume training. But as the weeks have passed I wonder... They are missing so much valuable training time. I think it's over. JMO.

MacMadame
02-24-2011, 09:34 PM
Do you think that not going helps...
Isn't that obvious from my post? ;)

I think there might be some ways to go to North Korea that would help but going to skate before the supreme dictator as part of his birthday celebrations isn't one of them.