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Matryeshka
01-20-2011, 02:56 PM
So, according Travel + Leisure magazine, the rudest cities in America are (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/40758837/ns/travel-news):

20. Anchorage, AK
19. Houston, TX
18. Providence, RI
17. Santa Fe, NM
16. Seattle, WA
15. Chicago, IL
14. San Francisco, CA
13. Memphis, TN
12. Phoenix/Scottsdale, AZ
11. Atlanta, GA
10. Dallas/Ft. Worth, TX
9. Orlando, FL
8. Las Vegas, NV
7. Baltimore, MD
6. Boston, MA
5. Washington, DC
4. Miami, FL
3. Philadelphia, PA
2. New York, NY
1. Los Angeles, CA

Big, bad cities on the coasts really are RUDE and Southern cities really are charming and polite :encore:


Interestingly, two cities whose main industry is tourism—and, presumably, hospitality—landed in the Top 10 of Rude, too: Las Vegas and Orlando. In their defense, one has to wonder: did visitors get flack from actual locals, or just other visitors who were throwing sharp elbows to get a picture with Minnie?

Sometimes, too, there may be a disconnect between what seems to be rudeness and what is perhaps just a different manner


Some of these I understand--definitely was not charmed by Phoenix, AZ OR Santa Fe, NM. Or Dallas. Or really anywhere in the southwest. Or Philly (sorry hydro). Most unhelpful police force on the planet. If I had to live in Baltimore, Providence, or Anchorage, I'd be :mad: too. :P Totally understand Orlando too; I'm sure it gets wearing dealing with tourists to MouseLand day in, day out. They must get the most annoying people on the planet, as it's the #1 family destination in the world.

I kind of wonder about Vegas, Houston, and Atlanta though. IME, people in Vegas were exceedingly polite and helpful (to the point of annoyance in some cases) and I wonder if it's rudeness that landed it on the city or idiots losing more $$$ than they could afford. I also wonder with Houston and Atlanta if it's the traffic/roads that make tourists irritable. My GPS has gotten lost, and the road system could compete with any rude Euro city any day of the week. I'd be less tolerant too if I found out I was spending most of my vaycay in traffic. I'm also shocked by LA being up there--I thought everyone I met in LA was very nice. Boston I understand, but its gruffness has its own charm after awhile. Surprised New Orleans isn't up there--we're bad about giving tourists what-for if we deam their behavior inappropriate, but maybe the :alcool: helps with that.

Thoughts on rudest cities?

nubka
01-20-2011, 03:15 PM
Yea!! SLC, Utah wasn't on the list. Now I can sleep at night...:D

Jenny
01-20-2011, 03:19 PM
Do travel magazines ever have content other than endless polls and rankings? :yawn:

I do have to stick up for New York though - as a foreigner who spent three years living and working there, I found New Yorkers to be very welcoming and helpful. Just about everyone I met was ready to offer advice, and on many occasions, total strangers even offered their assistance to me.

oleada
01-20-2011, 03:34 PM
Rude! :cheer:

I do think that sometimes it's a difference in culture. I moved to New York after 5 years in the Midwest. In the city I lived in, it was common to smile, look people in the eye and chat people up - total strangers - in public places. Hardly anyone will do this in New York - people just go about their business, which people who are used otherwise can find rude. My parents complain that people in New York are aggressive and push and shove too much, but honestly, if I'm not aggressive about it, I'm not getting on the subway at Rush hour. And that Maceys display might be real cute but you're blocking the sidewalk and I need to get to work :).

FigureSpins
01-20-2011, 03:36 PM
I'm from NY...they're probably ticked off that they didn't get the #1 spot. In fairness, upstate and downstate are completely different. The eye contact oleada mentioned is absolutely true: no one will make casual eye contact with you in NYC unless they're diverting your attention from their pickpocket partner. That alone was unnerving when I went on business trips to Ohio where they not only LOOKED you in the eye...they said hello! *gasp*

I kind of agree about Dallas, TX. I remember going to skate at the Galleria mall and getting dirty looks from overdressed shoppers. I was wearing sweats without makeup, but in NY they would have just ignored me, in Dallas, they tried to stare me down. (As if that would work.)

oleada
01-20-2011, 03:39 PM
My Houstonian best friend would agree on Dallas - she thinks they're snobs.

my little pony
01-20-2011, 03:41 PM
The weirdest thing for me when I travel to a nicer place is that strangers look you in the eye which I hate. That totally means they are going to stalk and kill you.

Beefcake
01-20-2011, 03:44 PM
Ah, just as there are trashy and classy people everywhere, there are rude bastahds and sweetie pie people everywhere, too!

I've spent decent amounts of time in all these cities, save Anchorage, and I pretty much agree with what's on here and in what order ... well, having dealt with WDC Metro people and traffic for 18 years, maybe I'd make it an LA/DC tie at the "top". :cold:


So, according Travel + Leisure magazine, the rudest cities in America are (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/40758837/ns/travel-news)
Big, bad cities on the coasts really are RUDE and Southern cities really are charming and polite :encore:
Southern, yeh, but they pegged Atlanta and Orlando pretty correctly. ;) (Though, like NYC, Orlando suffers from rude tourists knocking scores downward.)

But even better -- Midwestern! :kickass: I agree with which ones are missing, namely Cleveland, Columbus, Indianapolis, Nashville, and Saint Louis. GENUINELY friendly folks abound in the Great Lakes states to the Plains states. Is there a "nicest" list?

Andora
01-20-2011, 03:47 PM
I do have to stick up for New York though - as a foreigner who spent three years living and working there, I found New Yorkers to be very welcoming and helpful. Just about everyone I met was ready to offer advice, and on many occasions, total strangers even offered their assistance to me.

I couldn't believe how friendly and helpful people were in NYC. My friend and I listed attractions we wanted to see on a map. When we pulled it out to to check what was near us, at least three people stopped to ask if we needed help. The whole five days, we couldn't have found more friendly people.

BlueRidge
01-20-2011, 03:54 PM
IN D.C., we're not rude. We're just busy. :shuffle:

Orable
01-20-2011, 04:01 PM
I don't think the folks in Providence are rude; just a bit brusque. And Chicagoans are NICE! :P

oleada
01-20-2011, 04:04 PM
IN D.C., we're not rude. We're just busy. :shuffle:

Yeah, same here :shuffle:

For what it's worth, I hate making small talk with random people I don't know. I find it really annoying. Even worse is people who tell you to smile - my natural expression is somewhat serious and why would I walk around smiling like an idiot anyway. I'd rather be left alone minding my own business.

Satellitegirl
01-20-2011, 04:06 PM
I've never been to a city that could be considered "rude", personally. There are always friendly people willing to help somewhere.

danceronice
01-20-2011, 04:09 PM
Boston should definitely be higher. (And partially, it's the roads, which could turn anyone into a spree killer out of sheer frustration, but partially it's just a large subset of the population have a serious superiority complex and are less rude than just Massholes.)

Detroit: not on the list because no one ever goes there to be insulted.

pingu
01-20-2011, 04:15 PM
I'm from NY...they're probably ticked off that they didn't get the #1 spot. In fairness, upstate and downstate are completely different. The eye contact oleada mentioned is absolutely true: no one will make casual eye contact with you in NYC unless they're diverting your attention from their pickpocket partner. That alone was unnerving when I went on business trips to Ohio where they not only LOOKED you in the eye...they said hello! *gasp*
Well, I think that's typical of every big city. In Milan they look angrily at you just because you're not walking fast enough in the subway during rush hours.