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View Full Version : Welcome to My World by Johnny Weir - It's here, deal with it!



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Sylvia
01-17-2011, 07:59 PM
I'm willing to give Johnny the benefit of the doubt when it comes to his recounting of various US judges' negative remarks to him as published in his book. I've heard anecdotes from other elite skaters over the years about less-than-constructive criticisms and/or insensitive remarks by certain judges, but my sense is that it involves a very small minority and that the majority of judges try to be tactful and helpful to skaters and coaches with their comments and feedback.

Snowgirl
01-17-2011, 08:22 PM
I'm about half way through the book and the most upsetting thing to me has been his "diss" of Art Devlin's Olympic Motor Inn in Lake Placid. I stayed there last yr and loved it....He basically hates Lake Placid in general..

Maybe it was different back in 2003?
Anyway, he comes to Lake Placid every summer for a show and seems to enjoy it. The city he doesn't like is Colorado Springs.

mmscfdcsu
01-17-2011, 08:28 PM
Maybe it was different back in 2003?
Anyway, he comes to Lake Placid every summer for a show and seems to enjoy it. The city he doesn't like is Colorado Springs.

Ummmm he describes Lake Placid pretty much as creepy in his book. :shuffle:
The writing was not good...but not as awful as I had expected. The most frustrating thing for me was the shallowness, lack of detail and almost complete lack of insight. You could tell that this book was a rush job. Johnny is an interesting and complex person. I would love to see an biography rather than an autobiography.

BittyBug
01-17-2011, 08:37 PM
I've heard anecdotes from other elite skaters over the years about less-than-constructive criticisms and/or insensitive remarks by certain judges, but my sense is that it involves a very small minority and that the majority of judges try to be tactful and helpful to skaters and coaches with their comments and feedback.I'll echo this. While most judges are professional to the core, love this sport dearly, and selflessly give their time, there are some that are among the cattiest individuals I've encountered in skating, and that's saying a lot. Judges are humans just like the rest of us. Not all of them are saints. :saint:

luCN
01-18-2011, 01:11 AM
It's a club competition held in summer in the United States, mainly for American skaters, but skaters of other nationality are frequently featured as guests, like Patrick Chan in the olympic year.

Then it sounds not so important,right?maybe what Johnny said is right,someone take a small practice too mach?

I'm not in America,so base on the description I think this way...

overedge
01-18-2011, 01:32 AM
Then it sounds not so important,right?maybe what Johnny said is right,someone take a small practice too mach?

I'm not in America,so base on the description I think this way...

As noted upthread, it's not "important" in that it's not a qualifier for other competitions like sectionals or regionals. But it is one of the largest competitions in the United States, and because of its timing (mid-summer) many skaters, including elite skaters, use it as a chance to test their programs before the competitive season formally starts.

BreakfastClub
01-18-2011, 02:31 AM
As noted upthread, it's not "important" in that it's not a qualifier for other competitions like sectionals or regionals. But it is one of the largest competitions in the United States, and because of its timing (mid-summer) many skaters, including elite skaters, use it as a chance to test their programs before the competitive season formally starts.

What really makes Liberty significant are the judges and the post-competition critiques. It's one of the few club competitions where the panels are rich with high-profile national and international US judges and all skaters have the option to attend the critique and receive individual feedback as a scheduled part of the competition. This is why it attracts so many skaters from the US west coast and Canada and even international competitors who are training in the Philadelphia/Delaware area (e.g. Viktor Pfeiffer).

Patrick Chan is not a "guest" at Liberty, he chooses to register of his own accord just like any other skater, and comes just like the rest of them: for the opportunity to skate in front of elite judges and get feedback.

I finished reading Johnny's book and I have to admit, I was a little shocked at how hard he dissed this competition. He attended Liberty regularly up through his junior years, when it was still known as Wissahickon as held the Wissahickon SC rink. It has always attracted a few well known senior men including The Hulking Classless Idiot :P, Ryan Jahnke, Derrick Delmore and Ryan Bradley all in that same 2000-2006 timeframe.

Johnny's performance from that competition is actually posted on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c8weRNM2ENo In fact, I'm 98% sure I'm the one who made that video. :lol: My good friend was both a huge DVD/tape trader and major Johnny über back then so she'd bring her camera to make videos for trade bait. She was way too nervous work the camera for Johnny and had me do it. I clearly recognize her voice saying, "I think my battery is ok..." as Johnny skates out. I'm sure that video made it's way around to a few Johnny übers through several trades and somehow made its way onto YouTube 7 years later. :rofl:

Whoever said in this book Johnny admits all his own mistakes but doesn't own up to them trapped in a circle of blame ("people made me do it their way, therefore I made mistakes, therefore it's not my fault, it's their fault!") hit the nail on the head. It's nice that he finally admitted to faking his illness at Cup of Russia and faking his first injury when he fell into the wall at Nationals. But serious :fragile: :fragile: :fragile: - "I had to pretend I was sick because they wouldn't let me wear my fabulous sparkly onesie, therefore I had no choice... and then I really wanted to skate in Japan the following week and they pulled me from it because I was soooo sick here but I wouldn't come out of my hotel room to let a doctor see me. See how my federation is against me!!"

Wow. Major issues. :drama: I never realized how close he was to giving Sandhu a run for his money in the "there were ghosts in my hotel room" department...

Prancer
01-18-2011, 02:37 AM
He basically hates Lake Placid in general..

Just going by the excerpts, I have the impression that Johnny hates small towns, period.

manleywoman
01-18-2011, 02:47 AM
Just going by the excerpts, I have the impression that Johnny hates small towns, period.

I think you've nailed it.

UWDawg
01-18-2011, 03:11 AM
I'm about half way through the book. I gotta say, what annoys me the most, is how many times he mentions how skinny he was at blah blah time. He's already said it about 30 times.

We get it - you're skinny!

He also keeps mentioning how the US federation is against him and trying to hurt his career - but really I don't see much evidence of that. At least he doesn't provide it. Seems like it's just him shooting himself in the foot....

mmscfdcsu
01-18-2011, 03:17 AM
About the only thing that I learned about was his love for chicken fingers. :lol:

Some not so great shots from the Beachwood book signing. Johnny was full of energy, darting out to hug just about everyone.

http://s1230.photobucket.com/albums/ee484/mmscfdcsu/Johnny%20Beachwood%20Ohio/

kwanfan1818
01-18-2011, 03:39 AM
So I wonder if Weir is rather accustomed to things coming naturally as opposed to having to work for them. And when he has to work, he loses interest and motivation. In short, I wonder if Weir wants all the perks of success without having to actually work for it. Everything he talks about pursuing are basically hobbies of his. He designs costumes on the side, and then wants to get paid for it without working long hours as an apprentice and studying fashion in school. He's interested in learning things, but doesn't want to have to trudge through several years of college. He wants to be a skating champion, but not to the point where he has to forego getting drunk in an after-hour party before a competition.

So maybe part of his lack of direction stems from not being able to identify a career that would allow him success without having to pay his dues.
Or, if the research Carol Dweck has done (as described in "NurtureShock") is applicable, that he was praised for being a natural, the sports equivalent of smart, and not for his work habits took away his confidence and made working hard an untenable option "I am smart the kids' reasoning goes; I don't need to put out effort. Expending effort becomes stigmatized--it's public proof you can't cut it on your natural gifts."

And


Of those praised for their intelligence, a majority chose the easy test. The "smart" kids took the cop-out.

Why did this happen? "When we praise kids for their intelligence, " Dweck wrote in her study summary, "we tell them this is the name of the game: look smart, don't risk making mistakes." And that's what the fifth graders had done. They'd chosen to look smart and avoid the risk of being embarrassed."

This resonated with me reading Weir's description of his early skating career, which is as far as I've gotten to.


You listen to the advice that makes sense to you and ignore the rest. You don't have a hissy fit and throw away your chance to be on the GP circuit.
When the officials' and judges' sole advice was specifically to drop the costume because they considered it an embarrassment, there was no option to throw them a bone and keep the costume. It was keep the costume or ditch the costume.


The deal with Birkin bags is that it IS the ultimate status symbol. People don't want it because it's a well-made purse or for its design. Rather, they want it because in order to have one you have to be put on Hermes's waiting list (traditional way), have connections to sidestep waiting list, or procure it via some 3rd party transactions. Believe or not, fashionistas get really creative with trying to purchase Birkin bag because it instantaneously says to other fashionistas "Bitch I'm way better than you, look what I got!"
There was a "Sex and the City" episode in which Samantha tries to hustle a Birkin bag.


It doesn't matter if he becomes a citizen of someplace else because he's competed for the USA so recently. He would have to be released by U.S. Figure Skating.
If he became a citizen of another country, he could skate two years from the 2010 Olympics without permission from USFS. I'm not sure where in the ISU world he could marry someone and get citizenship that quickly. Marriage usually reduces the amount of time needed in residency to become a citizen, but doesn't eliminate it.

Bonita
01-18-2011, 04:15 AM
I'm about half way through the book. I gotta say, what annoys me the most, is how many times he mentions how skinny he was at blah blah time. He's already said it about 30 times.

We get it - you're skinny!



When you have an ED, even if you're "recovered," or getting there, you constantly talk/think about it. He states he's 5'9 135 now, "eating everything." Maybe it's more than a slab of chicken and a dry salad, but that's crazy skinny still. My goal/fantasy weight now as a 5'8 woman is 130 (would love to lose ten). When I had an ED my goal was 115 (I realize now not cool). I shudder to think what he weighed when he was competing. Evan was just as skinny. I always thought it was the girls, but lately the guys are scaring me more. EDs are also about control as well, and champions are often control-oriented. I only had these issues over 30, I'm still confused why skaters in their mid-20s training so many hours per day have to starve....Don't they burn it off naturally?

UWDawg
01-18-2011, 04:31 AM
When you have an ED, even if you're "recovered," or getting there, you constantly talk/think about it. He states he's 5'9 135 now, "eating everything." Maybe it's more than a slab of chicken and a dry salad, but that's crazy skinny still. My goal/fantasy weight now as a 5'8 woman is 130 (would love to lose ten). When I had an ED my goal was 115 (I realize now not cool). I shudder to think what he weighed when he was competing. Evan was just as skinny. I always thought it was the girls, but lately the guys are scaring me more. EDs are also about control as well, and champions are often control-oriented. I only had these issues over 30, I'm still confused why skaters in their mid-20s training so many hours per day have to starve....Don't they burn it off naturally?

I guess it just surprised me how much he talked about it, because my best friend years ago had an ED and she would always talk about how MUCH she ate, and would never mention how skinny she was. Because she didn't want people knowing.

I think he's just really proud of how skinny he was while skating. And I'm not sure I buy how little he was eating while skating....how could he possibly train and compete eating less than 1000 calories a day?! I just can't wrap my head around that!

Anita18
01-18-2011, 04:58 AM
Or, if the research Carol Dweck has done (as described in "NurtureShock") is applicable, that he was praised for being a natural, the sports equivalent of smart, and not for his work habits took away his confidence and made working hard an untenable option "I am smart the kids' reasoning goes; I don't need to put out effort. Expending effort becomes stigmatized--it's public proof you can't cut it on your natural gifts."
Or if you're particularly narcissistic about your intelligence, you could overshoot your goals just to prove you can do it. Like a very-intelligent English major friend of mine who yearned to take organic chemistry just to prove she could be smarter than the pre-med kids. :rofl:


When you have an ED, even if you're "recovered," or getting there, you constantly talk/think about it. He states he's 5'9 135 now, "eating everything." Maybe it's more than a slab of chicken and a dry salad, but that's crazy skinny still. My goal/fantasy weight now as a 5'8 woman is 130 (would love to lose ten). When I had an ED my goal was 115 (I realize now not cool). I shudder to think what he weighed when he was competing. Evan was just as skinny. I always thought it was the girls, but lately the guys are scaring me more. EDs are also about control as well, and champions are often control-oriented. I only had these issues over 30, I'm still confused why skaters in their mid-20s training so many hours per day have to starve....Don't they burn it off naturally?
Everybody has a weight their body likes to be at (which can be considered overweight or underweight), and for some people it would take a lot of work, starving or overeating, to get their body to shift either way. Like my body likes to be at a particular weight, and even though it's considered underweight by all medical measures, even if I try I can't get it higher. I'd have to try A LOT harder than I am right now to gain. :lol: And when I was recovering from the stomach flu, I ate only an apple a day for weeks and lost 10 lbs. Granted, it's a lot on me but for many people 10 lbs wouldn't be that much, especially on a one-apple diet. :P

If a skater's natural weight is a little over than what they'd like, they'd pretty much have to starve themselves in order to get their body to the point where they'd like it to be.