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View Full Version : Caroline Zhang changes coaches to Peter Oppegard



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Polymer Bob
04-05-2011, 02:05 PM
Maybe it's just not feasible for her to do it anymore.

She did her pearl at Nationals in January. Though it did seem more labored than it has in the past.

Dragonlady
04-05-2011, 04:46 PM
Girls lose flexibility post-puberty making what was once easy, more difficult. Ligaments lose elasticity as we mature.

Anita18
04-05-2011, 06:58 PM
Maybe it's just not feasible for her to do it anymore.
Plus if she's losing the ability to do it, I'd prefer she'd put more effort into improving her jumps and skating skills rather than a single spin position that she could do when she was 13. :P

Coco
04-06-2011, 02:14 AM
No kidding!! It always creeped me out anyway, since it didn't look healthy.

Dragonlady
04-06-2011, 03:33 AM
. . . it didn't look healthy.

The first time I saw her do the pearl spin, my thought was "There are back problems in her future". It was stunning, but looked very risky.

Seeing Caroline's mule kick lutz also made me fear for her health. Her hips were twisting and torquing in ways that did not bode well for her future. That's the biggest reason I was happy that she's taking the time to fix her technique.

I don't want these kids suffering permanent injury from the sport and I want them to be able to walk without a cane when they're my age.

reese
04-06-2011, 04:15 AM
No kidding!! It always creeped me out anyway, since it didn't look healthy.

Agree. Crazy flexibility moves, especially ones emphasizing spine flexibility, make me cringe when I see them on kids. Coaches love them because they make a skater (or gymnast) stand out, but they can be big trouble ten years down the road. It's irresponsible coaching in a lot of situations, imo.

riveredge
04-06-2011, 05:35 AM
Agree. Crazy flexibility moves, especially ones emphasizing spine flexibility, make me cringe when I see them on kids. Coaches love them because they make a skater (or gymnast) stand out, but they can be big trouble ten years down the road. It's irresponsible coaching in a lot of situations, imo.

Well it's like basketball, for most fans dunking is fun but most of the young players they tend to forgot the fundamentals.

Marco
04-06-2011, 07:39 AM
The first time I saw her do the pearl spin, my thought was "There are back problems in her future". It was stunning, but looked very risky.

Seeing Caroline's mule kick lutz also made me fear for her health. Her hips were twisting and torquing in ways that did not bode well for her future. That's the biggest reason I was happy that she's taking the time to fix her technique.

I don't want these kids suffering permanent injury from the sport and I want them to be able to walk without a cane when they're my age.

Kudos to her for fixing the flip, but the lutz and loop entrances still look like they could kill her legs very soon. The axel may look bad, but at least it isn't as damaging. :rolleyes:

Polymer Bob
04-07-2011, 01:07 AM
On other boards, I have read some pretty harsh comments about Caroline at this event. Well, let's see where she is at the start of next season. I hope she gets 2 GP events.

krenseby
04-07-2011, 07:04 AM
On other boards, I have read some pretty harsh comments about Caroline at this event. Well, let's see where she is at the start of next season. I hope she gets 2 GP events.

Well, I think that in the time between the end of one season and the beginning of another when skaters reduce their training frequency and intensity, there is a risk of regressing by the time the GP season starts.

I think Caroline is definitely at a risk for that, especially given that she hasn't had the time to solidify her new jump and stroking technique. At the beginning of the season, she could find that she isn't easing back into the competition mode and her jumps, spins, and stroking speed and power are simply not there. (Of course, the extent to which she has stroking speed and power is subject to debate.)

Also, I have the same concern with regard to Mirai Nagasu. After ascending to incredible heights during the Olympic season, she couldn't really hit her peak this year until 4CC. Hopefully, she is more motivated next season and can do her best.

Dragonlady
04-07-2011, 06:31 PM
Well, I think that in the time between the end of one season and the beginning of another when skaters reduce their training frequency and intensity, there is a risk of regressing by the time the GP season starts.

What makes you think that skaters reduce their training time and intensity in the off-season? Skaters spend MORE time at the rink during the summer months than at any other time of the year, especially the younger skaters who are still in school.

With no school in the summer time, skaters are free to devote their entire day to training, which they do. Without the distraction of school and homework, they can focus on preparations for the next season, learning new tricks and putting together their programs. Furthermore, their coaches are with them full-time. If you have a top coach with multiple skaters, your coach may be travelling with other skaters and you're at home with assistants. During the off-season, their main coach is at the rink every day.

International travel and competition reduces the time the skaters spend training because, when they go to competitions, they are restricted to official practice sessions. Jet lag can play havoc with their bodies so that a trip to Asia for an event will end up costing the skater 2 weeks of training time.

Skaters look forward to the summer months as being their prime time to improve and reboot for next season.

krenseby
04-07-2011, 07:10 PM
What makes you think that skaters reduce their training time and intensity in the off-season?

Because for one, once the status of Worlds was in limbo, Czisny's coaches reduced the intensity of her training. This makes me think that whatever training goes on in the off-season is not meant to get the skater into top competitive form. Also, many skaters tend to start off the season far from being in their best shape. Only after several competitive events, do they really get in gear.

RD
04-07-2011, 07:12 PM
It'll be interesting to see how much the X-factor comes into play here. The skaters who would have peaked in March may not be the same skaters that peak in late Apr/May.

mag
04-07-2011, 10:07 PM
Because for one, once the status of Worlds was in limbo, Czisny's coaches reduced the intensity of her training. This makes me think that whatever training goes on in the off-season is not meant to get the skater into top competitive form. Also, many skaters tend to start off the season far from being in their best shape. Only after several competitive events, do they really get in gear.

I think the change in Czisny's training schedule had more to do with making sure she doesn't burn out before Worlds. Training schedules are carefully constructed to make sure skaters peak at the right time. With the delay of worlds, those schedules have been thrown into chaos. Yes, many skaters take a short break at the end of the season to relax and heal any nagging injuries, but like Dragonlady said, the summer months are prime training time. I see it at our rink all the time. Many skaters take a week or two off in June and then train 5 days per week, all day through July and August. Just search on summer skating programs and you'll see what people are skating.

The reason skaters appear not to be in the best shape early in the season, again has to do with training to peak at the right point in the season. Some skaters need a small early peak at summer competitions so they perform well and get international assignments, they want to peak again at those assignments so they can earn valuable points, and then peak again at Nationals to try to make a National Team. Other skaters don't need to peak until late GP assignments and then again at Worlds. The schedules are all very individual based on where the skater is and what they want to accomplish.

krenseby
04-07-2011, 10:53 PM
Many skaters take a week or two off in June and then train 5 days per week, all day through July and August. Just search on summer skating programs and you'll see what people are skating. The schedules are all very individual based on where the skater is and what they want to accomplish.

You know I've noticed many skaters are not in peak form during the earliest competitions of a new season. Does this mean that their off-season training merely aims at skill maintenance but doesn't prepare them for competition? (Also, do some skaters have a reduced training schedule and/or some time, whether days or weeks, away from training altogether? Some may skate in shows, others may study or travel.)