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IceAlisa
12-31-2010, 08:29 PM
And it is one of Joyce Carol Oates' favorite, isn't it? And I love her work, so I may give it a try eventually.

galaxygirl
12-31-2010, 08:33 PM
And it is one of Joyce Carol Oates' favorite, isn't it? And I love her work, so I may give it a try eventually.

:cheer2:

Spinner
12-31-2010, 11:06 PM
:yawn:

When are you going to ask me for some recommendations for some quality zombie literature?When I ever become interested in reading zombie fiction, I'll let you know. :P

jen_faith
12-31-2010, 11:23 PM
I am still scared of Faulkner. Some day.

I liked Faulkner but mostly because I knew families IRL who were like the families he wrote about. Decaying gothic drama is small towns -- sounds like what I grew up with...

I am starting the following books:
Lost to the West (http://www.amazon.com/Lost-West-Forgotten-Byzantine-Civilization/dp/0307407969/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1293837337&sr=8-1) by Lars Brownworth. It is written as an extension of his excellent podcasts 12 Byzantine Rulers (http://12byzantinerulers.com/). He also is currently doing an excellent series of podcasts on the Normans, including the Italian Normans about whom I know little.

Earth (http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=%22what+if%22#/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_0_17?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=earth+jon+stewart&sprefix=earth+jon+stewart&rh=n%3A283155%2Ck%3Aearth+jon+stewart) by Jon Stewart et al, which I think will be a light, satirical read.

I am thinking of starting Before I Fall (http://www.amazon.com/Before-I-Fall-Lauren-Oliver/dp/006172680X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1293837696&sr=1-1) that came highly recommended by someone on NPR. I think it's a YA book but the reviewer loved it.

emason
01-01-2011, 12:04 AM
I am still scared of Faulkner. Some day.

Start with The Reivers - unlike anything else he wrote and accessible to all.

my little pony
01-01-2011, 12:44 AM
I am still scared of Faulkner. Some day.

when I was assigned Light in August in high school I became completely obsessed with it, i sent my english teacher a thank you note for assigning it (was it hormones?) and i bought a first edition of it

Wyliefan
01-01-2011, 04:11 PM
As I Lay Dying isn't too bad. It's very short and the stuff you don't understand you can either skip or read the summaries online. :)

I didn't understand a word. I'd need a very long summary. :lol: I realize he's a great author and all; I just had a lot of trouble with him.

galaxygirl
01-01-2011, 05:36 PM
I didn't understand a word. I'd need a very long summary. :lol: I realize he's a great author and all; I just had a lot of trouble with him.

I think I understood about half. :lol: I'm not completely sure what happened in the book but I enjoyed the parts I did understand.

jen_faith
01-01-2011, 06:25 PM
I think I understood about half. :lol: I'm not completely sure what happened in the book but I enjoyed the parts I did understand.

A lot of what Faulkner was writing about sort of went over my head too. He uses so much allegory and symbolism and unless you know the South, the politics of the times and the times just previous, and Southern history well, I think you will miss a lot of what he was trying to get at with his writing.

That said, you can still enjoy the stories he tells on a more literal level. And that being said, I am on a "my brain is tired and only wants to read junky fiction" phase and Faulkner is no where on my reading horizon. In fact, I don't think I've read him since college and only willingly read a few of his works without them being assigned reading.

Wyliefan
01-01-2011, 07:12 PM
I'm reading Robin McKinley's Pegasus now, and holy cow, it's actually readable! I'm thrilled to death that she finally gave up that awful convoluted writing style she'd gotten into. The plot could be a little stronger, and she still does those huge digressions and flashbacks, but I'm so happy that she no longer sounds like Henry James on steroids, I don't even care.

Nomad
01-02-2011, 05:53 PM
As I Lay Dying isn't too bad. It's very short and the stuff you don't understand you can either skip or read the summaries online. :)

I'll second that. I didn't like Sanctuary or Requiem for a Nun, but I'll probably read more Faulkner at some point. Maybe The Rievers as emason suggested.

I'm between books at the moment. I think I might finish up Olivia Manning's Balkan Trilogy. I don't care much for either of the main characters but the secondary characters and the overall story make up for that.

IceAlisa
01-02-2011, 06:03 PM
If you believe Gelsey Kirkland (should I?), Mikhail Baryshnikov is a real tool as well, sort of like Mr. B. The ballet community she describes sounds like as far as they are concerned, feminism never happened.

One thing I am enjoying about the book is her descriptions and musings on the differences between Russian and American schools of ballet and how (IMO) she would have thrived in a Russian system and struggled a lot less. Also, I love her detailed accounts of building a role Balanchine style (form over content) vs. Russian style that's heavy on content and character dancing.

emason
01-02-2011, 11:46 PM
I'm between books at the moment. I think I might finish up Olivia Manning's Balkan Trilogy. I don't care much for either of the main characters but the secondary characters and the overall story make up for that.-

I just purchased this recently and have it waiting by my bedside. I think I'll delve into it one of these days and see what I think.

PrincessLeppard
01-03-2011, 12:01 AM
I just started reading Matched by Ally Condie. More dystopian literature--sort of my favorite kind. The people think they are living in a utopia, but slowly discover it's not all it's cracked up to be.

genevieve
01-03-2011, 01:24 AM
I don't blame you, I finally got through You Don't Love Me Yet and a day later I still want to kill the #3@$!! hipster protag.



It's not because I think I won't like it...I loved Motherless Brooklyn and Fortress of Solitude. Chronic City just seemed a little too much like FoS trapped in a Donald Barthelme story. I need more space from his previous work before I can dive into it again, I guess.

note to self: don't start a new book right before falling asleep on a very tired night. I just had to reread the entire first chapter of The Night Watch because I didn't remember a single thing about it :lol: