PDA

View Full Version : Everything By the Book



Pages : 1 2 3 4 5 6 [7] 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67

oleada
12-31-2010, 05:28 AM
The last chapter of The Unbearable Lightness of being, when it's all about the dog dying, had me :fragile: :wuzrobbed

At the same time, the parts dealing with the dog were my favorite parts of the book :shuffle:

Prancer
12-31-2010, 06:19 AM
I've been thinking about getting one for some time. I have rather traumatic memories of having to move with too many books, so I've developed a fear of buying books (not that it stopped me completely). But I still love to read. What do you have, a Kindle? I've been thinking about an iPad, but maybe a Kindle would be better (too many distractions with an iPad, and why pay extra for stuff I have my computer for?). Too bad I can't play with both before I decide.

Oh, dear, I am SO the wrong person to ask, as I have far too much to say on the subject (I know--what else is new). I took a seminar in using e-book readers and e-books in the classroom a couple of months ago, and I got to play with all kinds of readers and apps. Wheeeee!

I have a NookColor. My husband gave it to me for Christmas and I love it, but left to my own devices, I wouldn't have bought it--or an iPad, either. The next generation of e-readers will be coming along very soon and all of them will be some kind of tablet, with a lot of integrated media to accompany the text. There should be a new iPad coming out by April at the latest and if the rumors are true, it will be much nicer than the one out now and people will be wishing they had waited. Of course, that's always the case with technology, but still.

Much depends on what you would use the device for. If you are primarily interested in reading e-books, period, then you would be better off with the Kindle or the second version of the Nook. Both are more like books than not, with e-ink and a glare-free screen that is easy on the eyes and clear in any light. The main drawback to having a Kindle is that Amazon locks it up; you can only read Amazon products on it (unless you have some friends in the library who know how to get around such things :shuffle:). The Kindle is the only e-reader on the market that doesn't read the open source ePub format, which is the format that most library and free e-books are in.

There are several other e-readers on the market, too, most of them cheaper than any of the big three. Sony is making a massive move toward World Domination by targeting everyone BUT Americans, and then there are the others--Kobo, iPapyrus, etc.

If you want something that is more than a reader but not quite a laptop, the iPad would be the way to go. It's flashy and fun and cool. As an e-reader, it's fast and looks great, but has its drawbacks. The screen tends to be kind of glare-y and the animated flipping page gets really old after a while. But it actually looks like an opened book, with two pages on the screen, as opposed to the Nook and Kindle, which show you one page at time. The new iPad is rumored to have a USB port (I considered the lack of one a huge drawback to the current model), a camera, possibly a phone app, and even better definition and graphics, among other things. It's a fantastic toy.

The NookColor is something of a cross between the two. It's essentially an Android; if you are willing to risk killing it, you can root the thing and basically HAVE an Android. The NookColor has color (obviously) and everything is done by touchscreen. It is heavier and has a shorter battery life than the Kindle because of that. It reads almost anything (and with Calibre, you can convert any e-reader file to another type of file, so you can, in theory, read anything, one way or another), allows borrowing and lending, and is very easy to use. Because it has color, however, it does not have e-ink or a non-glare screen, which means it's like reading on an iPad. I don't have a problem with it and can read on it for hours, but some people get tired eyes after a while. You can surf the 'net, play games, stream Pandora, read a book, etc. It's not as flashy as the iPad, but it's flashier than a Kindle and is much better for people who read magazines and newspapers. One drawback for people who travel a lot, however, is that the Nook can't access wi-fi outside the US; the Kindle can.

One thing you can do to test the systems, if not the readers, is download all the reader apps and try them. Then you will have some idea of how the store works if not the device. There are far more people using the apps to download books and read them than there are people buying the devices themselves. An amazing number of people read on their phones, which would drive me insane.


(Oh my WORD, As I Lay Dying. :scream: One of the worst experiences of my college years. And our professor was a Faulkner fanatic, so we had to listen to this normally mild-mannered little guy rave on and on about the wonderfulness of this incomprehensible piece of weirdness.)

:lol: I had to read Faulkner for a class taught by a professor who DETESTS Faulkner and always made a point of reminding us that in an anonymous survey of English professors, Faulkner was named the most over-rated American author EVER. He wasn't the raving type, but he would come close when he started in on Faulkner. I think he had us read Faulkner just so he could rant :lol:.

galaxygirl
12-31-2010, 06:57 AM
(Oh my WORD, As I Lay Dying. :scream: One of the worst experiences of my college years. And our professor was a Faulkner fanatic, so we had to listen to this normally mild-mannered little guy rave on and on about the wonderfulness of this incomprehensible piece of weirdness.)

I enjoyed As I Lay Dying :shuffle:. Not much of a Faulkner fan otherwise, though.

PrincessLeppard
12-31-2010, 02:37 PM
I just picked this up on a friend's recommendation as her fave Austen. Looking forward to it!

:yawn:

When are you going to ask me for some recommendations for some quality zombie literature?

orientalplane
12-31-2010, 03:10 PM
Love's Labor's Lost


Love's Labour's Lost, if you don't mind.

made_in_canada
12-31-2010, 03:17 PM
What about The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks (http://www.amazon.com/Immortal-Life-Henrietta-Lacks/dp/1400052173/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1293770663&sr=8-1)? It is nonfiction, so I don't know if that would work for your group, but it's one of my favorite books of the last five years.


I'd suggest Isabel Wilkerson's The Warmth of Other Suns (http://search.barnesandnoble.com/The-Warmth-of-Other-Suns/Isabel-Wilkerson/e/9780679444329/?itm=1&USRI=warmth+of+other+suns). Stunning, brilliantly written story of the untold migration of African-Americans out of the south from around 1920s through the civil rights struggle of the 60s, 70s and present day. It was just picked by the New York Times as one of the 10 best books of the year. Also, in the link you can watch a brief interview with Wilkerson about the book.

Thanks! These are both on the short list now!

Wyliefan
12-31-2010, 03:42 PM
Love's Labour's Lost, if you don't mind.

I stand corrected!

jeffisjeff
12-31-2010, 04:12 PM
What about The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks (http://www.amazon.com/Immortal-Life-Henrietta-Lacks/dp/1400052173/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1293770663&sr=8-1)? It is nonfiction, so I don't know if that would work for your group, but it's one of my favorite books of the last five years.

I got that one for Christmas. It sounds really interesting! I plan to start reading it tonight since I just finished one of my other Christmas gifts (the latest Scarpetta :shuffle: ).

flyingsit
12-31-2010, 04:45 PM
I just read Escape by Carolyn Jessop, about her life in the FLDS and how she got out. I've read a couple of other books about them (Jon Krakauer's Under the Banner of Heaven and Elissa Wall's Stolen Innocence) and I think I will probably find a couple more. I'm fascinated and horrified at the same time.

Evilynn
12-31-2010, 04:56 PM
Which one? I still haven't read Chronic City. I bought it well over a year ago now! :shuffle:

I don't blame you, I finally got through You Don't Love Me Yet and a day later I still want to kill the #3@$!! hipster protag.



...snipping useful stuff...
One thing you can do to test the systems, if not the readers, is download all the reader apps and try them. Then you will have some idea of how the store works if not the device. There are far more people using the apps to download books and read them than there are people buying the devices themselves. An amazing number of people read on their phones, which would drive me insane.

I thought it'd drive me nuts, but I have a 4" screen, and it's actually not so bad. I only really use it during my commute, but it's definitely doable. I've downloaded the Kindle Android app, but haven't gotten around to downloading any books yet, but I'm going to see what they offer in Sweden and give it a whirl.

I finished both books I was reading (In the Cities of Coin and Spice (http://www.amazon.com/Orphans-Tales-Cities-Coin-Spice/dp/055338404X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1293814358&sr=8-1) was good, You Don't Love Me Yet (http://www.amazon.com/You-Dont-Love-Vintage-Contemporaries/dp/140007682X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1293814376&sr=8-1) was not. :P) and to celebrate getting through 62 books this year (some of which had been standing on my unread shelf for nigh on a decade), including a reasonable amount of classics and modern classics, I'm going to read Charlaine Harris's A Touch of Dead (http://www.amazon.com/Touch-Dead-Sookie-Stackhouse-Complete/dp/0441017835/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1293814512&sr=8-1) next. :P

Wyliefan
12-31-2010, 05:19 PM
I just read Escape by Carolyn Jessop, about her life in the FLDS and how she got out.

I read that a couple of years ago. Very compelling.

Michalle
12-31-2010, 06:39 PM
i've never been able to get through a Faulkner novel before, but I recently read The Wild Palms and fanatically loved 1/2 of it. It has two main stories and goes back and forth between them (one chapter for Story A, next chapter Story B, then chapter for Story A and so forth). They're not really connected, except perhaps thematically (not even sure about that either), and for me Story B is far superior to Story A, much more cohesive and polished, but it creates an interesting contrast. Story B is about a convict who is sent to fetch a stranded woman during the 1927 Mississippi flood, and it's just amazing - I really recommend the book on the basis of that.

oleada
12-31-2010, 06:52 PM
I just read Escape by Carolyn Jessop, about her life in the FLDS and how she got out. I've read a couple of other books about them (Jon Krakauer's Under the Banner of Heaven and Elissa Wall's Stolen Innocence) and I think I will probably find a couple more. I'm fascinated and horrified at the same time.

I really liked all those three books, especially Krakauer's. I agree with the "fascinated but horrified" sentiment.

IceAlisa
12-31-2010, 07:49 PM
:lol: I had to read Faulkner for a class taught by a professor who DETESTS Faulkner and always made a point of reminding us that in an anonymous survey of English professors, Faulkner was named the most over-rated American author EVER. He wasn't the raving type, but he would come close when he started in on Faulkner. I think he had us read Faulkner just so he could rant :lol:.

I am still scared of Faulkner. Some day.

galaxygirl
12-31-2010, 07:53 PM
I am still scared of Faulkner. Some day.

As I Lay Dying isn't too bad. It's very short and the stuff you don't understand you can either skip or read the summaries online. :)